Author Topic: Direct Control  (Read 703 times)

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AzCal Retred

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on: February 25, 2023, 10:45:37 pm
Many years back I saw an article in the paper that stated the Air Force had declassified a direct mind control chip for aircraft. This is the stuff of Sci-Fi but apparently now exists in the real world. Maybe an implanted interface chip becomes a condition of employment? Could be a real job boom coming for quadriplegic's, a win-win. The same chip that runs a sub-sea mining or hazmat clean-up machine at work could likely operate a company supplied full-body exoskeleton. Apparently we live in the "Firefox" future?

Can mind-controlled VR games help stroke patients
https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-64720533
A system which can translate human brain activity into actions without any physical movement is being developed by a neurotech firm called Cogitat.
When wearing a prototype headset, basic actions in virtual reality can be carried out by thinking about them.
So for example, in a game where a VR jet ski is controlled by handles, you move by thinking about it, rather than squeezing your hands.
Elon Musk's firm Neuralink is developing a similar concept.
It is called brain-computer interface and there are many neurotech companies exploring it.
One aim is that it could eventually allow people who have suffered a stroke, or have other brain injuries, to control phones or computers remotely.
Neuralink's method requires a chip being placed into the brain itself. The firm has so far only worked with animals, and has been criticised for their treatment. It has released videos it says demonstrate a monkey playing the video game Pong with its mind, and the brain activity of a pig with a chip implanted in its brain.
Cogitat is one of the firms developing a system which works on top of the head rather than inside it.
It could one day take the form of a headband worn with a VR headset. Some companies are already creating their own hardware but, as a university spin-off, Cogitat is concentrating only on the tech behind it.

https://futurism.com/the-byte/jets-pilots-mind-control-darpa
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GlennF

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Reply #1 on: February 25, 2023, 11:23:14 pm
There is actually a slight delay between when the brain sends a signal to do something like move a finger or tap your foot and when the body responds. Transmission of information through the nervous system is not instantaneous their is a delay.

The brain does some fancy mental gymnastics to make it feel like it all happens simultaneously and lets us think when we decide to lift a finger it responds immediately but actually that is not the case.

I recall back in my college days we looked at an experiment where they used sensors to pick up signals leaving the brain to move a finger and press a button. They then used that signal to activate a slide projector instead of the button. The subjects reported a disconcerting situation where they were about to press the button and the slide changed by itself at a point where it was too late to stop pressing he button.

Basically the idea is sensing nerve signals for things like pressing the fire button on a missile would give a very small but noticeable speed advantage when firing. 

Whether that translates to enough of a real world advantage sufficient to justify the cost and complexity is another matter.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2023, 11:25:35 pm by GlennF »


him a layin

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Reply #2 on: February 26, 2023, 12:19:55 am
this sort of thing gives me the willies. no, thanks. when i'm a basket case i may reconsider.


Leofric

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Reply #3 on: February 26, 2023, 01:06:12 am
I recall back in my college days we looked at an experiment where they used sensors to pick up signals leaving the brain to move a finger and press a button. They then used that signal to activate a slide projector instead of the button. The subjects reported a disconcerting situation where they were about to press the button and the slide changed by itself at a point where it was too late to stop pressing he button.
Basically the idea is sensing nerve signals for things like pressing the fire button on a missile would give a very small but noticeable speed advantage when firing. 
or accidentally fire it just by thinking about it -
better keep this system away from nuclear buttons !