Author Topic: Chain Adjuster Clean-Up  (Read 359 times)

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Jack Straw

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on: April 08, 2021, 01:34:45 am
A few months ago George at TEC showed these things on a video.  I thought it was a neat idea.  Here's an Amazon link;
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07JPKHCN1/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Interceptor 650, Honda VT500 Ascot at present
Norton Commando, Ducati Diana Mk. III, CB 500/570, KLR 650, Ducati 250 Scrambler, CB 350, Honda S 90, YDS-3, SV 650 and a few others in the past.


zimmemr

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Reply #1 on: April 08, 2021, 02:00:39 am
A few months ago George at TEC showed these things on a video.  I thought it was a neat idea.  Here's an Amazon link;
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07JPKHCN1/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


I like them. (Not that anyone asked me) ;D


6504me

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Reply #2 on: April 08, 2021, 02:26:59 am
Another take on the chain adjuster clean up...


Jack Straw

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Reply #3 on: April 08, 2021, 02:29:59 am
Ha!  I guess it's a boy.
Interceptor 650, Honda VT500 Ascot at present
Norton Commando, Ducati Diana Mk. III, CB 500/570, KLR 650, Ducati 250 Scrambler, CB 350, Honda S 90, YDS-3, SV 650 and a few others in the past.


CPJS

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Reply #4 on: April 08, 2021, 08:36:21 am
Ha!  I guess it's a boy.
I'm not so sure.
You need to stay abreast of things, assuming there is one on the other side.
Current bikes.
R E GT650
BMW R1200GS
Honda CRF250L
BSA B25SS

Still young enough not to care, too old to remember why.


Bibbage

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Reply #5 on: April 08, 2021, 10:46:03 am
Here’s another option, heat shrink sleaving. 
Current Bikes:-
Interceptor 650 (Baker Express)
Triumph Speed Twin 5TA (1966)
Past Bikes:-
Honda S90 (first bike)
Honda CB160
Triumph T21 3TA 350
BSA Bantam 150
Suzuki 80
Honda CB125
Honda Super Dream 250
Triumph Legend 900
Suzuki GSX750F


zimmemr

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Reply #6 on: April 08, 2021, 01:51:48 pm
Another take on the chain adjuster clean up...

That's as old school cool as it gets. ;) ;) ;)


viczena

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Reply #7 on: April 08, 2021, 01:53:50 pm
What is the reason for that?
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Harley CVO EGlide, Boss Hoss 502, BMW 1200 RT, Harley Panhead , Harley Davidson &Marlboro Man Bike BD2, Royal Enfield Trials. And some more.


zimmemr

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Reply #8 on: April 08, 2021, 02:04:11 pm
What is the reason for that?

It was once popular to slip a piece of fuel line over the exposed ends of the chain adjuster, especially on bikes that were used off-road to protect the threads from dirt. That way if you had to make a quick chain adjustment by the side of the trail it was less likely that the adjuster nut would seize on the adjuster and possibly strip the thread. At least that's why I use to do it on my Enduro bikes.  On street bikes it keeps the threads clean and gives the adjuster a finished look.

6504me can better explain why he did it, but I know we have similar backgrounds so I think his thinking would be similar. :)


viczena

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Reply #9 on: April 08, 2021, 02:16:43 pm
THX for the explanation.
www.enfieldtech.de
Harley CVO EGlide, Boss Hoss 502, BMW 1200 RT, Harley Panhead , Harley Davidson &Marlboro Man Bike BD2, Royal Enfield Trials. And some more.


zimmemr

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Reply #10 on: April 08, 2021, 02:38:48 pm
THX for the explanation.

My pleasure ;)


6504me

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Reply #11 on: April 08, 2021, 03:25:43 pm
It was once popular to slip a piece of fuel line over the exposed ends of the chain adjuster, especially on bikes that were used off-road to protect the threads from dirt. That way if you had to make a quick chain adjustment by the side of the trail it was less likely that the adjuster nut would seize on the adjuster and possibly strip the thread. At least that's why I use to do it on my Enduro bikes.  On street bikes it keeps the threads clean and gives the adjuster a finished look.

6504me can better explain why he did it, but I know we have similar backgrounds so I think his thinking would be similar. :)

I prefer the design where a bolt screws into the swingarm rather than a naked stud ticking out, but the stud is cheaper.

Double flange nuts just looks stupid. Flange nut and lock nut looks better to me.

Covering the threads keeps me from ripping my hands up when cleaning around that area.


Marcsen

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Reply #12 on: April 08, 2021, 08:44:23 pm
My take on cleaning up the adjuster
Isle of rügen, germany .
Wachau austria


6504me

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Reply #13 on: April 08, 2021, 10:15:42 pm
My take on cleaning up the adjuster

Nice touch, but those double flange nuts gotta go.


Marcsen

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Reply #14 on: April 08, 2021, 11:27:27 pm
Nice touch, but those double flange nuts gotta go.


Sure . They will go in style soon
Isle of rügen, germany .
Wachau austria