Author Topic: Himalayan hands free?  (Read 372 times)

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Toni59

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on: April 02, 2021, 04:14:17 pm
Today I finished the first 1000 km on my Himalayan - and every single km was fun :-)

But what I realized  today is weird:
When I try to ride hands free straight ahead, I have to lean far to the left side, otherwise the bike will turn right.

Does anybody have an idea what the reason for that is?

Thanks for help

Toni


zimmemr

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Reply #1 on: April 02, 2021, 05:20:33 pm
Today I finished the first 1000 km on my Himalayan - and every single km was fun :-)

But what I realized  today is weird:
When I try to ride hands free straight ahead, I have to lean far to the left side, otherwise the bike will turn right.

Does anybody have an idea what the reason for that is?

Thanks for help

To some degree it's normal, but if it's excessive check your wheel alignment.

Toni


Toni59

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Reply #2 on: April 02, 2021, 06:46:33 pm
You are right, I just checked it and the rear wheel seems not to be aligned properly :-(

Apparently I need to have a serious word with my garage - it was just in for inspection 500 km ago.

Where can I find the torque for the rear axle - the manual provided with the bike just refers to "use the right torque..." :-(


regards

Toni



zimmemr

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Reply #3 on: April 02, 2021, 07:05:44 pm
You are right, I just checked it and the rear wheel seems not to be aligned properly :-(

Apparently I need to have a serious word with my garage - it was just in for inspection 500 km ago.

Where can I find the torque for the rear axle - the manual provided with the bike just refers to "use the right torque..." :-(


regards


Toni

The torque setting is in the shop manual, and I suspect it's hidden in the fine print of the owners manual. I believe it's 50 ftlbs, but my memory isn't so good these days so better double check. The swing arm marks aren't as accurate as they should be so don't be concerned if they aren't perfectly aligned when you get the wheel where it needs to be. A lot of guys use some sort of chain alignment tool to square it all up. I do it by eye, but I've been doing it over 50 years.  ;)


oldphart

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Reply #4 on: April 03, 2021, 05:13:38 am
You are right, I just checked it and the rear wheel seems not to be aligned properly :-(

Apparently I need to have a serious word with my garage - it was just in for inspection 500 km ago.

Where can I find the torque for the rear axle - the manual provided with the bike just refers to "use the right torque..." :-(


regards

Toni

A bike shop will just line the axle up with the alignment marks... which only works if they're accurate. There's a good chance they aren't, and not because RE are roughly built. Over the years, I've had two bikes that had inaccurate alignment marks, both were Japanese and one was a GSXR-1100, a bike where it really mattered.

The easiest way to check alignment is to 'string line it' - ie, you use a piece of string. There should be plenty of youtube videos, but choose an easy one, I've seen a few that just make it too much like hard work. Some people love to over complicate things.

I'm not sure how zimmemr does it by eye, but I'm quite sure it can be done, if only as a quick check to see if you've got a problem or not.
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Toni59

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Reply #5 on: April 03, 2021, 06:01:47 am
As always when you look closer at something it turns out to be not as easy as thought on the first...

The rear wheel seems to be mounted in such a way that it points to the right: I measured this from the respective outer edge of the rim to the outer edge of the swingarm: on the right it is about 11 cm, on the left about 12 cm.

To correct this, the axle should be further forward on the right or further back on the left. But that's not possible, because the axle on the right is already at the front edge of the adjustment window. If I want to adjust the left tensioner in this situation so that the wheel runs straight, the chain is much too tight. Can it be that the chain has one link too few?

What do you think?

Regards
Toni


oldphart

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Reply #6 on: April 03, 2021, 09:00:14 am
Wheel alignment has nothing to do with the swingarm clearance, that could be different simply because it was made that way.

This video shows how to string line your bike. Accurate and easy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1hgZ1eLmPE
Grandpa Slow

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zimmemr

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Reply #7 on: April 03, 2021, 01:07:40 pm
A bike shop will just line the axle up with the alignment marks... which only works if they're accurate. There's a good chance they aren't, and not because RE are roughly built. Over the years, I've had two bikes that had inaccurate alignment marks, both were Japanese and one was a GSXR-1100, a bike where it really mattered.

The easiest way to check alignment is to 'string line it' - ie, you use a piece of string. There should be plenty of youtube videos, but choose an easy one, I've seen a few that just make it too much like hard work. Some people love to over complicate things.

I'm not sure how zimmemr does it by eye, but I'm quite sure it can be done, if only as a quick check to see if you've got a problem or not.

After I get the chain slack set I spin the wheel, if the chain is centered on the sprocket, we're good to go. If it runs to one side of the sprocket I know wheel is cocked. It's a trick I picked up racing flat track, where we often had to make quick gearing changes between practice sessions or between the heat race and the main and didn't have a lot of time. It's not the most accurate method in the world but it works well enough. ;)



Richard230

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Reply #8 on: April 03, 2021, 02:07:10 pm
What I have always done, when possible, is to measure from the center of the front swing arm bolt to the center of the rear wheel axle bolt, both of which I locate accurately and then mark with a punch which makes it easier in the future to accurately find the center of the fasteners. If this doesn't work perfectly then there is something wrong with the frame or swing arm design and/or their manufacturing or assembly.  :(
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Toni59

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Reply #9 on: April 05, 2021, 11:44:40 am
Thanks a lot for all the hints.

I have tried the string method according the Video, and it shows a similar result as my measurement at the swing arm: rear wheel should be drawn back on the left side, but since the axle is already at the front end of the span window on the right side, chain would be far too tight when I drawn it back on the left side so that the wheel is straight. Means, I only have enough chain play when wheel is turned to the right...

The chain has 110 links, but obviously it should have one or two more to be able to use the tolerance window for chain tension in a reasonable way...

Any further ideas?

Toni


zimmemr

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Reply #10 on: April 05, 2021, 03:53:36 pm
Thanks a lot for all the hints.

I have tried the string method according the Video, and it shows a similar result as my measurement at the swing arm: rear wheel should be drawn back on the left side, but since the axle is already at the front end of the span window on the right side, chain would be far too tight when I drawn it back on the left side so that the wheel is straight. Means, I only have enough chain play when wheel is turned to the right...

The chain has 110 links, but obviously it should have one or two more to be able to use the tolerance window for chain tension in a reasonable way...

Any further ideas?

Toni

If the alignment is so far off that the correct chain play can only be achieved by misaligning the wheel than something is radically wrong. Since the bike is new I'd have the dealer take a look at it before going any further. No disrespect but my gut feeling is that a combination of inexperience and
new owner concern may be skewing your results, but that being said you might also have a genuine problem. How much slack are you giving the chain?


Toni59

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Reply #11 on: April 05, 2021, 07:41:51 pm
You are probably right - tomorrow I will make a call to my dealer and tell him my problem.

The chain slack is currently 25 - 30 mm as required according manual.

Regards

Toni


zimmemr

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Reply #12 on: April 05, 2021, 10:43:51 pm
You are probably right - tomorrow I will make a call to my dealer and tell him my problem.

The chain slack is currently 25 - 30 mm as required according manual.

Regards

Toni

You're right on the money has far as the slack goes. Did you check it with your weight on the bike? To account for sag in the suspension chain slack should always be measured with the riders weight on the bike. You'll probably find that with your weight on the bike the chain is a little tight. If that's the case back off the chain adjusters until you have the correct chain slack with your weight on the bike. Then see if you can square the wheels, while still maintaining the correct slack. If that method works at least you'll save yourself a trip to the dealership. 


Toni59

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Reply #13 on: April 06, 2021, 06:29:56 pm
You are right: when the bike is with the rider, the chain is borderline tight  :(

It's strange that the owner's manual doesn't describe this.

Since the axle is already in the front position on the right side, as described several times, and I cannot pull it back far enough on the left side without the chain being too tight, I have no way to straighten the wheel.

I will visit my dealer...

Regards
Toni


zimmemr

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Reply #14 on: April 06, 2021, 09:39:19 pm
You are right: when the bike is with the rider, the chain is borderline tight  :(

It's strange that the owner's manual doesn't describe this.

Since the axle is already in the front position on the right side, as described several times, and I cannot pull it back far enough on the left side without the chain being too tight, I have no way to straighten the wheel.

I will visit my dealer...

Regards
Toni

At this point I think the dealer is your best solution. Good luck and please let us know how they resolve it.  :)