Author Topic: Rocky Mountain MotoGiro 2015  (Read 330 times)

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Karl Fenn

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Reply #15 on: March 29, 2021, 12:59:06 pm
Well l think it clear there was a design issue in the rockers with the needles, more than coincidence three of us had same problem, the design would have been more reliable with no needles just steel shafts, obviously the design engineers were to clever for their own good, it was not lubrication related there was a lot of oil going to rocker feed, l think it was the needles unable to take the stresses, with a simpler design there would have been no problem.


zimmemr

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Reply #16 on: March 29, 2021, 02:28:21 pm
Well l think it clear there was a design issue in the rockers with the needles, more than coincidence three of us had same problem, the design would have been more reliable with no needles just steel shafts, obviously the design engineers were to clever for their own good, it was not lubrication related there was a lot of oil going to rocker feed, l think it was the needles unable to take the stresses, with a simpler design there would have been no problem.

I think BMW upgraded the bearings to a design that reduced the number of needles per bearing, and increased their diameter. I suspect the small diameter needles led to "crowding" which caused them to skid, overheat and fail. My buddy spent over 30 years working for the same BMW dealership and as I said told me it was a fairly common problem, especially on bikes that were ridden with "spirit."


Richard230

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Reply #17 on: March 29, 2021, 02:42:51 pm
I think BMW upgraded the bearings to a design that reduced the number of needles per bearing, and increased their diameter. I suspect the small diameter needles led to "crowding" which caused them to skid, overheat and fail. My buddy spent over 30 years working for the same BMW dealership and as I said told me it was a fairly common problem, especially on bikes that were ridden with "spirit."

Well, it is true that a couple of months before I found the loose bearings, CC Products in San Jose had spun the engine up to 8K rpm on their dyno in an effort to prove that the special muffler that I had just bought, and they they had just installed for free, had increased the horsepower of my R80. So that likely didn't help the life of the rocker bearings any.  ;)  I am just glad that the damage occurred during the warranty period.  :)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


zimmemr

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Reply #18 on: March 29, 2021, 03:38:52 pm
Well, it is true that a couple of months before I found the loose bearings, CC Products in San Jose had spun the engine up to 8K rpm on their dyno in an effort to prove that the special muffler that I had just bought, and they they had just installed for free, had increased the horsepower of my R80. So that likely didn't help the life of the rocker bearings any.  ;)  I am just glad that the damage occurred during the warranty period.  :)

As I recall, no sure thing these days, mine had about 30K on it when the bearing let go, but it also seems that the cost of the replacement parts, was reasonable. My bike was 1978, bought new and never serviced by anyone but myself, and bearings were replaced  in 1986 or 87 as I recall, so I guess I can't complain.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #19 on: March 29, 2021, 03:51:42 pm
Top 5 Reasons to ride a Small Motorcycle on a Long Adventure trip
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adX56io-sr4

6 Best Small Adventure Bikes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nm_ZLU8AYvI


x
« Last Edit: March 29, 2021, 03:54:08 pm by AzCal Retred »
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Richard230

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Reply #20 on: March 29, 2021, 04:19:25 pm
Speaking of rocky mountains, check out this latest Itchy Boots episode. It will keep you on the edge of your seat:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KKi_vUz0sJ8
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Karl Fenn

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Reply #21 on: March 29, 2021, 07:54:58 pm
My bike was not old, but l did ride it with spirit sometimes, however never thacked it, it was a very low millage bike as well, l was lucky got to it in time easy fix.


gizzo

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Reply #22 on: March 29, 2021, 10:30:02 pm
Some friends and I are planning a trip for Sept, should be about 3000km all up. 50/50 mix sealed and off road. I'm taking my well maintained 30 yo DR250S. It'll keep up, no worries. I can't wait.
simon from south Australia
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Karl Fenn

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Reply #23 on: March 29, 2021, 11:15:31 pm
Well should be ok they were a fast bike had quick acceleration.


nicholastanguma

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Reply #24 on: April 18, 2021, 05:32:37 am
This would be a hoot for those of us with suitable hardware. Ran last in 2019.

Rocky Mountain MotoGiro 2015
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jp9Nhe6J6kw


https://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-japanese-motorcycles/classic-honda-motorcycles/1968-honda-cb160-zm0z21mazbut?utm_source=wcemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=MCC%20eNews%2003-25-21&wc_totalkey=jXeF2vGkzYlc4AC08ZscLAyz8B5F98vFZoaJvl5WBSsx6aikLJuPTyGbORUs0z_vgjWd2iIFOv33gPp0C2Hi9Q
While he’ll ride the CB160 on the winding roads around his Kelowna property, it’s a bike he enjoys using annually at the Rocky Mountain MotoGiro. Designed for motorcycles 1969 and older and 250cc and less, this MotoGiro consists of a 186-mile endurance ride and a timed 6.8-mile hill climb. According to Thompson, “The MotoGiro is a real test for machines, and for my CB160 that means continuous all-day operation at between 8,000rpm and redline at 10,000rpm.


Very fun, thanks for posting!