Author Topic: Rocky Mountain MotoGiro 2015  (Read 329 times)

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AzCal Retred

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on: March 28, 2021, 07:51:47 am
This would be a hoot for those of us with suitable hardware. Ran last in 2019.

Rocky Mountain MotoGiro 2015
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jp9Nhe6J6kw


https://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-japanese-motorcycles/classic-honda-motorcycles/1968-honda-cb160-zm0z21mazbut?utm_source=wcemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=MCC%20eNews%2003-25-21&wc_totalkey=jXeF2vGkzYlc4AC08ZscLAyz8B5F98vFZoaJvl5WBSsx6aikLJuPTyGbORUs0z_vgjWd2iIFOv33gPp0C2Hi9Q
While he’ll ride the CB160 on the winding roads around his Kelowna property, it’s a bike he enjoys using annually at the Rocky Mountain MotoGiro. Designed for motorcycles 1969 and older and 250cc and less, this MotoGiro consists of a 186-mile endurance ride and a timed 6.8-mile hill climb. According to Thompson, “The MotoGiro is a real test for machines, and for my CB160 that means continuous all-day operation at between 8,000rpm and redline at 10,000rpm.
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Karl Fenn

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Reply #1 on: March 28, 2021, 02:02:39 pm
Sounds cool the nearest l got to that was a couple of weeks in whales in the late 70,s many years ago, but there are some good mountain roads there especially in the Bala region. Cornwall is good a lot of high coast roads, and hills, coastal cliffs the veiws can be amazing just like flying a plane. There's a place called Poldark hill there quite a very steep one not a good idea to stall.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2021, 02:21:13 pm by Karl Fenn »


zimmemr

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Reply #2 on: March 28, 2021, 04:58:03 pm
This would be a hoot for those of us with suitable hardware. Ran last in 2019.

Rocky Mountain MotoGiro 2015
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jp9Nhe6J6kw


https://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-japanese-motorcycles/classic-honda-motorcycles/1968-honda-cb160-zm0z21mazbut?utm_source=wcemail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=MCC%20eNews%2003-25-21&wc_totalkey=jXeF2vGkzYlc4AC08ZscLAyz8B5F98vFZoaJvl5WBSsx6aikLJuPTyGbORUs0z_vgjWd2iIFOv33gPp0C2Hi9Q
While he’ll ride the CB160 on the winding roads around his Kelowna property, it’s a bike he enjoys using annually at the Rocky Mountain MotoGiro. Designed for motorcycles 1969 and older and 250cc and less, this MotoGiro consists of a 186-mile endurance ride and a timed 6.8-mile hill climb. According to Thompson, “The MotoGiro is a real test for machines, and for my CB160 that means continuous all-day operation at between 8,000rpm and redline at 10,000rpm.

There's an East Coast MotoGiro as well, I believe it was the first one in US. Because of the 250cc limit I've never had anything that I could ride in it, but friends have done it and said it's a hoot.


Karl Fenn

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Reply #3 on: March 28, 2021, 06:55:17 pm
Some of those old 250s had plenty of acceleration they would fly, l must say it was some of the best road riding l had done worth the slog of getting there, an amazing experience riding at height, it's flat where l live so a bit boring, l used to like 250s had a great deal of those in various formats, l liked the semi off roaders the best where l could enter new environments, the XS 250 was a good bike, you could actually tour on it, four stroke twin.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #4 on: March 28, 2021, 08:20:11 pm
Karl - you are violating the Omerta!  ;D ;D ;D  Touring can only be done on machines of 1000cc minimum displacement, otherwise you apparently lose "points"!

Where did you wander to on your 250 in your misspent youth?

This was informative:
https://www.rideapart.com/news/247859/how-to-take-a-1500-mile-road-trip-on-a-250cc-motorcycle/

The Meteor 350 contingent should start planning now...

https://www.facebook.com/Motogiro-USA-1102022509823784/
https://www.race-uscra.com/uploads/2/9/7/5/29751819/uscra_2018_rulebook_final.pdf




« Last Edit: March 28, 2021, 08:26:53 pm by AzCal Retred »
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


Karl Fenn

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Reply #5 on: March 28, 2021, 10:09:04 pm
Went to stone henge, up the North Coast down the South Coast, regularly to the beach, and many places l now forgot , oh and road to work 52 weeks of the year, that old girl would cruise at 70, they were quite a machine, l did a swap for a two stroke glad I did.


Karl Fenn

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Reply #6 on: March 28, 2021, 10:16:19 pm
Well they all say that, you need a big bike for touring buts that's puppycock, if you new the miles l racked up on sub 500s in the 70,s you would know why. I would never let that mindset stop me being  an anywhere rider or the cc, l mean what do they think would happen they will break down, Well a No! Actually l just read the ladies article and what she says is so true, but l would recommend a good tent and spirit cooker, It's nice when people prove these big experts wrong, she has the sort of mindset l had in the late 70s.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2021, 10:34:30 pm by Karl Fenn »


Richard230

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Reply #7 on: March 28, 2021, 10:27:24 pm
Speaking of 250's: Here is my daughter's first motorcycle. A 1987 Yamaha SRX250TC (price new $2,000). That bike was really fast. It once carried both of us down the I-280 freeway to pick up my repaired 1985 BMW R80 (which dropped all of its rocker bearings into the valve cover when the bearing cages let loose) at a continuous 9,000 rpm and 90 mph.   ;D

A couple of years later she sold that bike and bought a 1990 Suzuki GS500EL ($2,800) which she used to commute from my home in Pacifica to UC San Diego every weekend. She put 85K miles on that Suzuki in just five years. I performed the maintenance on the bike and one time she didn't change the oil for 20K miles. When I finally changed it the Mobil 1 synthetic oil came out of the crankcase in strings and lumps.  :o  It certainly was a tough little bike. Eventually, her husband ran the engine completely out of oil and it froze up. He brought it back home in the trunk of a borrowed car and then dumped more oil in the crankcase and it started right up, although it did knock a bit.  ::) She ran the bike with the knock for another 10K miles before selling it to a Mexican fellow for $800 who rode it from Seattle where she was living at the time to Mexico City. (We have no idea if he made it there under Suzuki power.  ??? )
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Karl Fenn

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Reply #8 on: March 28, 2021, 10:42:42 pm
Yep they were as tough as old boots for sure, l see you had the rocker issue with the R80, l got that T shirt to, l was lucky got mine stripped and rebuilt before it could do any real damage, it was OS exhaust side only one effected the rest were a ok, lucky l had an R80 l had broken so plenty of parts no cost.


zimmemr

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Reply #9 on: March 28, 2021, 11:21:43 pm
Yep they were as tough as old boots for sure, l see you had the rocker issue with the R80, l got that T shirt to, l was lucky got mine stripped and rebuilt before it could do any real damage, it was OS exhaust side only one effected the rest were a ok, lucky l had an R80 l had broken so plenty of parts no cost.
Oddly enough I also had an R80 that  spit out it's rocker arm bearings. According to a buddy of mine, who works for the local BMW dealer that was a fairly common issue.


Karl Fenn

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Reply #10 on: March 29, 2021, 12:28:00 am
Well they were not caged in the true sense of the word, but lose in fact in situ, just like pins, they were a pain to get back you had to stick them with a smare of grease, but in saying that only got the one issue after having four R80 variants never reared its head again.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #11 on: March 29, 2021, 12:44:50 am
See? That's what happens when you get too fancy! Plain steel-on-steel Enfield Bullet rockers are the ticket - they'll warn you when they start to get loose, no reason to get stranded. About $40 and 20 minutes of wrenching and you're back in business...no newfangled needle bearings need apply!   ::)
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Richard230

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Reply #12 on: March 29, 2021, 01:38:02 am
Oddly enough I also had an R80 that  spit out it's rocker arm bearings. According to a buddy of mine, who works for the local BMW dealer that was a fairly common issue.

My dealer never batted an eye about the rocker bearings coming loose. The funny thing is that I rode the bike for some time without the bearings being in place and never noticed the difference until I checked the valve lash at 4K miles. The repair was made under warranty on BMW's dime and I asked my dealer to replace the barrels, pistons and top end to R100S specifications and bill me for the additional cost of the 1000cc parts compared with the 800cc parts. As I recall the additional cost wasn't much.  ;D
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Karl Fenn

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Reply #13 on: March 29, 2021, 03:34:11 am
Well you know the Germans everything over engineered it's something in their genes, l might agree the RE rockers are a more cost effective design cheap as chips to replace, l did not like the 1,000 cc version of the air head it was not as smooth as the 80.


zimmemr

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Reply #14 on: March 29, 2021, 03:46:42 am
My dealer never batted an eye about the rocker bearings coming loose. The funny thing is that I rode the bike for some time without the bearings being in place and never noticed the difference until I checked the valve lash at 4K miles. The repair was made under warranty on BMW's dime and I asked my dealer to replace the barrels, pistons and top end to R100S specifications and bill me for the additional cost of the 1000cc parts compared with the 800cc parts. As I recall the additional cost wasn't much.  ;D

My experience was similar. I pulled the valve cover to do a routine adjustment and found the bearing had broken up. I changed them all to be safe and never had another problem.