Author Topic: "Scramblerizing" my Interceptor  (Read 1426 times)

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biscot

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on: March 27, 2021, 09:45:13 pm
I've decided it's time to "scramblerize" my Interceptor. Nothing too serious, just a "street scrambler" style. Around here we must have 10 miles of unpaved roads for every mile of pavement, and I don't want to save it just for my Jeep.
I'm thinking 70-30 tires, sump guard, etc., but the most challenging thing is finding high pipes. Any suggestions for me?


Fred Gassit

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Reply #1 on: March 27, 2021, 10:03:12 pm
Zard do a nice high level system but price is $$$.
Termignoni teased with pics two years ago, but their product has hnever reached market.
Saw prototype pics from a company named "Fastec", but again nothing in production.
TEC Bike Parts also showed a prototype but have not developed it yet.

Maybe also consider the tracker 2-1 from S&S if you are in the USA and the pricing makes sense?


NVDucati

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Reply #2 on: March 27, 2021, 10:09:10 pm
I've decided it's time to "scramblerize" my Interceptor. Nothing too serious, just a "street scrambler" style. Around here we must have 10 miles of unpaved roads for every mile of pavement, and I don't want to save it just for my Jeep.
I'm thinking 70-30 tires, sump guard, etc., but the most challenging thing is finding high pipes. Any suggestions for me?
Good fun. Good plan if you are at 10% pavement. If you are not going to be doing serious single track riding ... have you considered a real skid plate as opposed to just a sump guard? Then you don't have to mess with getting a high pipe system (unless you want the styling that they offer).
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biscot

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Reply #3 on: March 27, 2021, 10:15:53 pm
I love the look  of the TEC pipes. Too bad it's just a dream at this point.
I do like the high pipe look and am not going for an offroad setup, but am interested in what the "skid plate" might be. I've hit a few rocks in my day. I'm a bit more mellow these days.


CPJS

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Reply #4 on: March 27, 2021, 10:16:28 pm
Contact TEC UK and ask if they have any of their high exhaust bits left, do it quick! they no longer sell it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ot_XZBeK7rk&pbjreload=101
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biscot

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Reply #5 on: March 27, 2021, 10:37:35 pm
Thanks, I sent them an email.  Would love to get ahold of them - will let you know what I hear.


GravyDavy

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Reply #6 on: March 28, 2021, 12:53:35 am
If you lean toward the "street" end of "street scrambler", maybe consider the TEC Stinger.  It has kind of a 1970s Honda SL vibe, is light and not wildly expensive.

I'm kind of leaning toward a street scrambler approach myself.  Just have to do it incrementally.


olhogrider

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Reply #7 on: March 29, 2021, 12:07:37 am
Scrambler??? That's crazy! See if you can spot the changes ;D


GravyDavy

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Reply #8 on: March 29, 2021, 01:04:55 am
Scrambler??? That's crazy! See if you can spot the changes ;D
Seat doesn't match the grips, and the tires didn't come from a Model T Ford. Total hipster fail.


Fred Gassit

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Reply #9 on: March 29, 2021, 01:19:49 am
See if you can spot the changes ;D

Oooh, challenge accepted!  ;D
(Is it your bike? That exhaust is a mighty flex!)

Custom paint job.
Motone (or copy) UJ knee pads.
Motone (or copy) stick on goolie cropper, err, tank rack.
Shinko Trail Master tyres.
Hitchcocks (or similar) polished alloy front mudguard, mounted on spacers for tyre clearance.
RE fork gaiters.
RE sump guard.
Hubs laced to posh Excel rims (wider than stock?)
Ebay headlight brackets.
Smaller than stock headlight.
Headlight stone guard.
TEC Bike Parts levers.
Ebay bar end mirrors.
Aftermarket grips.
Wide handlebars (as cables have been rerouted). TR6 maybe?
Bar end indicators.
Zard high level exhaust system.
Hitchcocks (or similar) alloy rear mudguard.
Aftermarket rear light assembly.
Hagon rear shocks.
RE GT Touring seat.
Paddock stand bobbins.


biscot

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Reply #10 on: April 02, 2021, 04:44:09 pm
Scrambler??? That's crazy! See if you can spot the changes ;D

Is this your bike?
I love the exhausts - are they Zarn? What do you think of them?
How much of a pain is it to get to the seat pull?
Any idea if they could be fitted if you have the RE compact engine guards?
Any other issues with them?

Great job on this Interceptor.


CPJS

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Reply #11 on: April 02, 2021, 05:13:05 pm
Oooh, challenge accepted!  ;D
(Is it your bike? That exhaust is a mighty flex!)

Custom paint job.
Motone (or copy) UJ knee pads.
Motone (or copy) stick on goolie cropper, err, tank rack.
Shinko Trail Master tyres.
Hitchcocks (or similar) polished alloy front mudguard, mounted on spacers for tyre clearance.
RE fork gaiters.
RE sump guard.
Hubs laced to posh Excel rims (wider than stock?)
Ebay headlight brackets.
Smaller than stock headlight.
Headlight stone guard.
TEC Bike Parts levers.
Ebay bar end mirrors.
Aftermarket grips.
Wide handlebars (as cables have been rerouted). TR6 maybe?
Bar end indicators.
Zard high level exhaust system.
Hitchcocks (or similar) alloy rear mudguard.
Aftermarket rear light assembly.
Hagon rear shocks.
RE GT Touring seat.
Paddock stand bobbins.
Andreani fork internals?
Shock, Nitron, hagon?
Quick action throttle
Missing centre stand.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2021, 05:16:08 pm by CPJS »
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GravyDavy

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Reply #12 on: April 02, 2021, 11:38:53 pm
Oooh, challenge accepted!  ;D
(Is it your bike? That exhaust is a mighty flex!)

Custom paint job.
Motone (or copy) UJ knee pads.
Motone (or copy) stick on goolie cropper, err, tank rack.
Shinko Trail Master tyres.
Hitchcocks (or similar) polished alloy front mudguard, mounted on spacers for tyre clearance.
RE fork gaiters.
RE sump guard.
Hubs laced to posh Excel rims (wider than stock?)
Ebay headlight brackets.
Smaller than stock headlight.
Headlight stone guard.
TEC Bike Parts levers.
Ebay bar end mirrors.
Aftermarket grips.
Wide handlebars (as cables have been rerouted). TR6 maybe?
Bar end indicators.
Zard high level exhaust system.
Hitchcocks (or similar) alloy rear mudguard.
Aftermarket rear light assembly.
Hagon rear shocks.
RE GT Touring seat.
Paddock stand bobbins.

Extra points for "goolie cropper".

How do you feel about front-hinged Monza caps?


olhogrider

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Reply #13 on: April 08, 2021, 12:24:41 am
Oooh, challenge accepted!  ;D
(Is it your bike? That exhaust is a mighty flex!)

Custom paint job.
Motone (or copy) UJ knee pads.
Motone (or copy) stick on goolie cropper, err, tank rack.
Shinko Trail Master tyres.
Hitchcocks (or similar) polished alloy front mudguard, mounted on spacers for tyre clearance.
RE fork gaiters.
RE sump guard.
Hubs laced to posh Excel rims (wider than stock?)
Ebay headlight brackets.
Smaller than stock headlight.
Headlight stone guard.
TEC Bike Parts levers.
Ebay bar end mirrors.
Aftermarket grips.
Wide handlebars (as cables have been rerouted). TR6 maybe?
Bar end indicators.
Zard high level exhaust system.
Hitchcocks (or similar) alloy rear mudguard.
Aftermarket rear light assembly.
Hagon rear shocks.
RE GT Touring seat.
Paddock stand bobbins.
Wow! You got most of them! The fork cartridges are pretty hard to spot ;D


olhogrider

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Reply #14 on: April 08, 2021, 12:26:54 am
Seat doesn't match the grips, and the tires didn't come from a Model T Ford. Total hipster fail.
Seat faux pas is now corrected. I'll never be hip enough to put car tires on a bike. I once bought a GoldWing that had a car tire on the rear! Talk about unsafe at ant speed :P


olhogrider

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Reply #15 on: April 08, 2021, 12:29:58 am
Is this your bike?
I love the exhausts - are they Zarn? What do you think of them?
How much of a pain is it to get to the seat pull?
Any idea if they could be fitted if you have the RE compact engine guards?
Any other issues with them?

Great job on this Interceptor.
I love the looks and the sound. I moved the seat pull to the left side of the bike. I don't think the engine guard bars will fit so I haven't tried. The right side panel is surprisingly accessible. Remove the right shock bolt and pull a spring. The mufflers come right off.


olhogrider

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Reply #16 on: April 08, 2021, 12:32:07 am
Andreani fork internals?
Shock, Nitron, hagon?
Quick action throttle
Missing centre stand.
Correct on the cartridges. Hagons on the rear.
Throttle is stock, although the spring is repositioned for less tension. Centerstand is still there.


Breaker Express

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Reply #17 on: April 10, 2021, 01:01:42 am
I've decided it's time to "scramblerize" my Interceptor. Nothing too serious, just a "street scrambler" style. Around here we must have 10 miles of unpaved roads for every mile of pavement, and I don't want to save it just for my Jeep.
I'm thinking 70-30 tires, sump guard, etc., but the most challenging thing is finding high pipes. Any suggestions for me?

This is from Way2Speed
https://youtu.be/3J_Zv9VWaFg
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NVDucati

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Reply #18 on: April 10, 2021, 01:29:29 am
This is from Way2Speed
https://youtu.be/3J_Zv9VWaFg

That is a good looking exhaust system.
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biscot

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Reply #19 on: April 10, 2021, 01:44:57 am
I'd love to get my hands on one, by I don't know if you can even find one. Let me know if you find where to get them.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #20 on: April 10, 2021, 01:59:04 am
Slap on a 4.00x19" trials universal on the front, that provides a bit more rake & ground clearance, plus gives you a bit of floatation on soft ground. You'll likely need to raise the front fender, but it'll be a functional addition.










y
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Breaker Express

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Reply #21 on: April 10, 2021, 02:09:19 am
I'd love to get my hands on one, by I don't know if you can even find one. Let me know if you find where to get them.

Found these on eBay
https://www.ebay.com/b/Exhaust-Systems-/177996
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biscot

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Reply #22 on: April 10, 2021, 02:16:55 am
That link just took me to a bunch of random exhausts.


biscot

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Reply #23 on: April 10, 2021, 02:18:50 am
Slap on a 4.00x19" trials universal on the front, that provides a bit more rake & ground clearance, plus gives you a bit of floatation on soft ground. You'll likely need to raise the front fender, but it'll be a functional addition.


I only have the stock 18” rim.







y


AzCal Retred

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Reply #24 on: April 10, 2021, 03:07:54 am
Then look for a 4.00 x 18" trials universal, it'll achieve the same end. More surface area on loose ground is a good thing.
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biscot

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Reply #25 on: April 10, 2021, 03:37:51 am
Thanks, I’ll check it out.


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Reply #26 on: April 10, 2021, 04:17:17 pm
Note: If they are REAL trials tires, IRC, Michelin, Dunlop...........they will wear out VERY quickly with street use.
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Reply #27 on: April 10, 2021, 05:36:58 pm
Note: If they are REAL trials tires, IRC, Michelin, Dunlop...........they will wear out VERY quickly with street use.
9fingers
The key is "universal". That's what they used to call a tire with tiny blocks of tread. They just look like a trials tire but are made out of street rubber.


biscot

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Reply #28 on: April 10, 2021, 06:54:24 pm
That's more what I'm after - a "street scrambler" setup, so I can ride on the street or the unimproved roads we have so many miles of in Idaho. Not going after trail or cross-country riding, I'd get a different bike for that.
Plus, I've always loved the street scrambler style, ever since my Triumph TR6 days back in the '60's and early '70's. (Don't miss the carbs, the Lucas electronics, etc.)
I want to keep my stock wheels, use stock tire sizes, just get better grip on gravel and dirt roads. Probably still 70 percent street riding. Maybe an "adventure" tire? Not sure what those guys use but I see a lot of them around in the Salmon River country where I like to go (I mostly have stayed on the pavement so far, but they can take shortcuts). I suppose they mostly have 19" front tires, so I'm probably limited because of the 18" wheels.
p.s. Just for sentiment's sake, this bike is a dead ringer (even the color) for the TR6 I rode all over the western hemisphere back in the day. Is that classic or what? It was my first love. High pipes and better tires on my Interceptor, and I've got what I'm after, except still missing the kick-starter.  :D
« Last Edit: April 10, 2021, 07:28:31 pm by biscot »


biscot

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Reply #29 on: April 10, 2021, 08:43:07 pm
I'm going to order the Zard high-level exhausts unless somebody says there's a better option. I've seen them at Hitchcocks and at BestforBritts. Expensive but I don't see any options at this point. Way2Speed seems like vaporware.
Still looking for good tire options.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2021, 08:45:55 pm by biscot »


olhogrider

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Reply #30 on: April 11, 2021, 04:15:47 pm
That's more what I'm after - a "street scrambler" setup, so I can ride on the street or the unimproved roads we have so many miles of in Idaho. Not going after trail or cross-country riding, I'd get a different bike for that.
Plus, I've always loved the street scrambler style, ever since my Triumph TR6 days back in the '60's and early '70's. (Don't miss the carbs, the Lucas electronics, etc.)
I want to keep my stock wheels, use stock tire sizes, just get better grip on gravel and dirt roads. Probably still 70 percent street riding. Maybe an "adventure" tire? Not sure what those guys use but I see a lot of them around in the Salmon River country where I like to go (I mostly have stayed on the pavement so far, but they can take shortcuts). I suppose they mostly have 19" front tires, so I'm probably limited because of the 18" wheels.
p.s. Just for sentiment's sake, this bike is a dead ringer (even the color) for the TR6 I rode all over the western hemisphere back in the day. Is that classic or what? It was my first love. High pipes and better tires on my Interceptor, and I've got what I'm after, except still missing the kick-starter.  :D

That's what I was going for as well. I originally put a universal Shinko on the rear. It worked but I was uncomfortable with the clearance of the swingarm. The issue is the circumference near the swingarm pivot. With a longer or slightly stretched chain I could gain some room but with everything new it was tight. Tire selection in 18"wheels is what finally had me bite the bullet and swap rims to 19" and 17". There are a few good tires that are 50/50 street/dirt. When I got the BMW GS it had pure street tires. I swapped to the new Dunlop Trailmax Missions. They are incredible! The store was sold out when I needed tires for the Interceptor so I got Shinkos that cost half as much. Most "ADV" tires are simply street tires with deeper tread. Not worth the bother.

I love the Zard pipes! They run almost cool enough to touch, at least with a gloved hand. My 2010 Triumph Scrambler would roast my leg. I also like the way the Zard curves in where your knee would be. The others seem pretty straight. I wish the Zard were polished, more in keeping with the 60s vibe but the brushed look is well done.


biscot

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Reply #31 on: April 11, 2021, 09:56:30 pm
You have put together a great looking bike. I can't do it all right now, but one thing at a time.
Did you build the wheels yourself or have someone do it? I've built lots of bicycle wheels but never a motorcycle wheel.

Where did you buy the Zard exhaust? Did they have them in stock or was it special order?
« Last Edit: April 11, 2021, 10:02:42 pm by biscot »


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Reply #32 on: April 11, 2021, 10:11:26 pm
Check out this video of a scrambler

https://youtu.be/CnVfhW5msLc
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Reply #33 on: April 11, 2021, 10:32:36 pm
Nice video. At 8:16 & later there's an informative shot of the front end working and the front tire biting. It takes surface area & open tread to do that without carving into the ground or just skating straight ahead. The video basically showed you about the maximum terrain ruggedness the 650 is going to accept and not spit you off. Your are essentially replicating a 1960's desert sled. The fork is short travel, and nearly the entire stroke is being used in the mild terrain filmed. If that's what you are after, I'd copy the bike in the film, but still run the largest tire you can shoehorn between the forks. Looks like fun IF kept within it's operating limits. Beyond that the "street bike" geometry & suspension will try to hurt you, and you most certainly do not want 450 pounds of resentful, knobby equipped Enfield grinding you into the dirt at speed. There's a good reason the Desert Sleds faded into history when lighter, more nimble, better suspended hardware became available. Have fun but be advised.
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Reply #34 on: April 13, 2021, 05:50:10 pm
You have put together a great looking bike. I can't do it all right now, but one thing at a time.
Did you build the wheels yourself or have someone do it? I've built lots of bicycle wheels but never a motorcycle wheel.

Where did you buy the Zard exhaust? Did they have them in stock or was it special order?
I sent the hubs to Woody's in Colorado. After I sent them they said they would prefer the whole wheel but they still did a great job. I can't remember where I bought the Zard pipes. I think it was directly from their website.


olhogrider

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Reply #35 on: April 13, 2021, 05:53:37 pm
Nice video. At 8:16 & later there's an informative shot of the front end working and the front tire biting. It takes surface area & open tread to do that without carving into the ground or just skating straight ahead. The video basically showed you about the maximum terrain ruggedness the 650 is going to accept and not spit you off. Your are essentially replicating a 1960's desert sled. The fork is short travel, and nearly the entire stroke is being used in the mild terrain filmed. If that's what you are after, I'd copy the bike in the film, but still run the largest tire you can shoehorn between the forks. Looks like fun IF kept within it's operating limits. Beyond that the "street bike" geometry & suspension will try to hurt you, and you most certainly do not want 450 pounds of resentful, knobby equipped Enfield grinding you into the dirt at speed. There's a good reason the Desert Sleds faded into history when lighter, more nimble, better suspended hardware became available. Have fun but be advised.
Well said! When I had my 2010 Triumph Scrambler the owners manual stated clearly this is a styling exercise. Do not take it off road. Compare that to the 1200 Scrambler they are saying is a world class adventure bike capable of anything you want to throw at it!


biscot

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Reply #36 on: April 13, 2021, 06:02:53 pm
Nice video. At 8:16 & later there's an informative shot of the front end working and the front tire biting. It takes surface area & open tread to do that without carving into the ground or just skating straight ahead. The video basically showed you about the maximum terrain ruggedness the 650 is going to accept and not spit you off. Your are essentially replicating a 1960's desert sled. The fork is short travel, and nearly the entire stroke is being used in the mild terrain filmed. If that's what you are after, I'd copy the bike in the film, but still run the largest tire you can shoehorn between the forks. Looks like fun IF kept within it's operating limits. Beyond that the "street bike" geometry & suspension will try to hurt you, and you most certainly do not want 450 pounds of resentful, knobby equipped Enfield grinding you into the dirt at speed. There's a good reason the Desert Sleds faded into history when lighter, more nimble, better suspended hardware became available. Have fun but be advised.

Appreciate your comments. I cut my teeth on "desert sleds" and have been through the paces with them. I'm aware of their limitations, and have to say I have more limitations these days than they do. For me it's as much about nostalgia and the look of the bike - I won't be jumping any fences, just cruising on some dirt roads. I'll leave the acrobatics to the kids.


biscot

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Reply #37 on: April 13, 2021, 06:28:32 pm
I sent the hubs to Woody's in Colorado. After I sent them they said they would prefer the whole wheel but they still did a great job. I can't remember where I bought the Zard pipes. I think it was directly from their website.

Thanks - I contacted Zard and Hitchcocks - Hitchcocks was a little cheaper and quicker. Go figure.
Still undecided as I like my RE compact engine guards and hate to lose them. I've cracked a crankcase or two against a rock in my day; never a good time.


olhogrider

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Reply #38 on: April 13, 2021, 06:43:03 pm
Thanks - I contacted Zard and Hitchcocks - Hitchcocks was a little cheaper and quicker. Go figure.
Still undecided as I like my RE compact engine guards and hate to lose them. I've cracked a crankcase or two against a rock in my day; never a good time.
I considered the BAAK low pipes. They scream desert sled to me. Now they have a branch in Southern California. No idea the cost but if I hadn't gone with the Zard those would have been my choice. And you can keep the engine guards!


biscot

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Reply #39 on: April 13, 2021, 06:57:57 pm
Thanks, I'll check it out!


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Reply #40 on: April 13, 2021, 07:13:50 pm
Baak low pipes are gonna run you about $1,200 US. I know because I contemplated them for quite a while and pulled the trigger on them last week. I couldn’t justify the price until I could.


Blazes Boylan

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Reply #41 on: April 13, 2021, 07:58:11 pm
Baak low pipes are gonna run you about $1,200 US. I know because I contemplated them for quite a while and pulled the trigger on them last week. I couldn’t justify the price until I could.

Looking forward to pictures and details about the install.  I've been eyeing those for a long time but can't justify the price, yet.


NVDucati

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Reply #42 on: April 13, 2021, 08:24:10 pm
Baak low pipes are gonna run you about $1,200 US. I know because I contemplated them for quite a while and pulled the trigger on them last week. I couldn’t justify the price until I could.
[/b]
+1
So when they arrive will you install them immediately or sleep with them for a while? ;)
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Jack Straw

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Reply #43 on: April 13, 2021, 09:56:50 pm
Well boys, I guess that feller plumb bent over and BAAKED up.

No disrespect meant, if they're worth it to you that's all that really counts.  Be prepared for some nattering nabob to  shout that if you wanted expensive pipes YOU SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT A DIFFERENT BIKE ;)
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Reply #44 on: April 13, 2021, 10:03:43 pm
Well boys, I guess that feller plumb bent over and BAAKED up.

No disrespect meant, if they're worth it to you that's all that really counts.  Be prepared for some nattering nabob to  shout that if you wanted expensive pipes YOU SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT A DIFFERENT BIKE ;)

Lol. Couldn’t care less what anyone thinks to be honest. I learned early on not to let people tell you how to spend your money. It’s one thing if you really can’t afford it, but at the moment, I’m fortunate enough to be able to. I was at the point where I was either gonna trade in my GT or sink some serious money into it. I chose the latter.


Jack Straw

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Reply #45 on: April 13, 2021, 10:30:10 pm
+1
Interceptor 650, Honda VT500 Ascot at present
Norton Commando, Ducati Diana Mk. III, CB 500/570, KLR 650, Ducati 250 Scrambler, CB 350, Honda S 90, YDS-3, SV 650 and a few others in the past.


biscot

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Reply #46 on: April 13, 2021, 10:39:20 pm
Well boys, I guess that feller plumb bent over and BAAKED up.

No disrespect meant, if they're worth it to you that's all that really counts.  Be prepared for some nattering nabob to  shout that if you wanted expensive pipes YOU SHOULD HAVE BOUGHT A DIFFERENT BIKE ;)

What other bike? An Interceptor with expensive pipes is still a cheap bike, with lots of other things going for it.
I have a friend with a Himalayan who said it was such a cheap bike he spent $4000 for mods. (Of course he has 6 other bikes, so who can argue.)


JP33090

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Reply #47 on: April 13, 2021, 10:42:26 pm
By the way, I misspoke (mistyped?). The baak exhaust is actually just under $1,000 US.


Breaker Express

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Reply #48 on: April 13, 2021, 10:54:06 pm
Now they have a branch in Southern California.

I contacted them before I ordered my tail light kit and they only seem to work on bikes. I could not order parts to ship from there. Everything comes from France and you can have it delivered there to pick up or fitted.
Super nice people though.
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biscot

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Reply #49 on: April 14, 2021, 05:48:20 pm
I'm especially interested in the Termignoni scrambler exhaust for the Interceptor (see NVDucati's post on the GT exhaust thread for a pic) - lets me keep my compact engine guards. I've written them, but don't have a lot of hope that they exist - I'll update when I hear.


Fred Gassit

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Reply #50 on: April 15, 2021, 12:57:03 pm
I love the look  of the TEC pipes. Too bad it's just a dream at this point.

Out of curiosity I contacted matt Milburn of TEC to ask if there was any chance the high level exhaust would reach production.
His response:
"I am afraid that project is cancelled.  We were not happy with the airflow or the fit against the bike of the high level exhaust.  So we have shelved it and it is very unlikely we will pick it up again."


GravyDavy

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Reply #51 on: April 15, 2021, 01:02:04 pm
One thing I really dislike about the high pipes I have seen is that they appear to block access to the right sidecover, including the seat release & toolkit.


Fred Gassit

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Reply #52 on: April 15, 2021, 01:29:55 pm
One thing I really dislike about the high pipes I have seen is that they appear to block access to the right sidecover, including the seat release & toolkit.
Sorry, but I'm afraid I don't get that. The seat release is easily relocated, and my toolkit is still in its sealed plastic bag!
Any work I do on the bike at home I use my own tools, and if something unfortunate happens out on the road, it's "3 years free breakdown cover" to the rescue,
Would have thought the full "desert sled" style theme mandates a much more comprehensive externally mounted toolbag as well.


GravyDavy

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Reply #53 on: April 15, 2021, 01:39:49 pm
Sorry, but I'm afraid I don't get that. The seat release is easily relocated, and my toolkit is still in its sealed plastic bag!
Any work I do on the bike at home I use my own tools, and if something unfortunate happens out on the road, it's "3 years free breakdown cover" to the rescue,
Would have thought the full "desert sled" style theme mandates a much more comprehensive externally mounted toolbag as well.

Everybody has their own set of conditions. Southwest Virginia has lots of fabulous twisty back roads with no cell phone reception whatsoever and no guarantee that another vehicle will stop to help before the heat death of the universe. I require quick, full access to all of my on-bike tools.


Fred Gassit

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Reply #54 on: April 15, 2021, 02:02:23 pm
Fair enough. How many times have you broken down on your Interceptor?


Blazes Boylan

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Reply #55 on: April 15, 2021, 04:49:01 pm
According to Baak their bobber exhaust comes in at 95db.  I love the look but that's a bit loud for my tastes, especially if I'm gonna be out all day  (I'd be using ear plugs either way.)    I'm very anxious to get your impressions once you've installed them.


zimmemr

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Reply #56 on: April 15, 2021, 05:39:14 pm
Fair enough. How many times have you broken down on your Interceptor?

That would be exactly zero in 4K.  :o


biscot

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Reply #57 on: April 15, 2021, 06:48:40 pm
Zero times in 11,000 miles, except for a flat tire just after I left the dealer after a tire change (don't get me started on that).
Still, I've had a few over the (many) years, on other bikes of course, but these days I'm not half-way 'round the world. It's all relative to what your adventure is. Any bike can break down eventually (generally at an inopportune time) for one reason or another - best to be prepared for whatever your situation is. (OK, I admit, I was a Boy Scout).
Still, I doubt that high pipes making access to the minimal tool kit in the right side more difficult is going to be a game changer.


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Reply #58 on: April 16, 2021, 12:54:26 am
Fair enough. How many times have you broken down on your Interceptor?

Once.  I took off the right side cover, pulled off the tools and fixed the problem.  If I'd need to let the exhaust system cool down and somehow source tools to remove the pipes so I could get to my tools, I probably would have had to walk home and file an insurance claim on my motorcycle that was loaded into a pickup while I was walking to a place that had phone service.

I'll stick with prioritizing access to essential tools over installing poorly designed high pipes.  They could go on the left side if it were not for tradition.


olhogrider

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Reply #59 on: April 16, 2021, 01:52:36 am
One thing I really dislike about the high pipes I have seen is that they appear to block access to the right sidecover, including the seat release & toolkit.
I moved my seat release to the left side. My Powertronic sits in the spot where the toolbag was. The right shock Allen bolt and one spring come off and the mufflers just slide right off. It might add 90 seconds to accessing the right side cover, depending on how handy you are with an Allen wrench. I suppose that's something to dislike if you're prone to disliking things. ;D


zimmemr

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Reply #60 on: April 16, 2021, 02:06:57 am
Once.  I took off the right side cover, pulled off the tools and fixed the problem.  If I'd need to let the exhaust system cool down and somehow source tools to remove the pipes so I could get to my tools, I probably would have had to walk home and file an insurance claim on my motorcycle that was loaded into a pickup while I was walking to a place that had phone service.

I'll stick with prioritizing access to essential tools over installing poorly designed high pipes.  They could go on the left side if it were not for tradition.

No argument here but most of the iconic 60's and 70's scramblers like the CL Honda's TR6C and T100C Triumphs and a few others had their pipes mounted on the left. A few had one pipe on each side. So there's not much tradition to their thinking. I think the current trend of mounting them both on the right is because the guys building them are enamored with the "street tracker" look and don't realize the pipes are mounted on the right side of a dirt tracker to minimize damage in the event of a low side. Or maybe not. 8)


olhogrider

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Reply #61 on: April 16, 2021, 02:15:50 am
No argument here but most of the iconic 60's and 70's scramblers like the CL Honda's TR6C and T100C Triumphs and a few others had their pipes mounted on the left. A few had one pipe on each side. So there's not much tradition to their thinking. I think the current trend of mounting them both on the right is because the guys building them are enamored with the "street tracker" look and don't realize the pipes are mounted on the right side of a dirt tracker to minimize damage in the event of a low side. Or maybe not. 8)
The scramblers of my youth had them on the left. The flat track bikes all had them on the right. If they put the pipes on the left, someone would complain about battery access. Seriously, one Allen bolt is too much work? And "waiting for the pipes to cool"? These Zards run so cool I can grab the muffler with a gloved hand. Or wait five minutes for them to cool and use my bare hand. There is room under the seat for a few tools and if you're really that concerned there are all manner of tool pouches, including a fanny pack.  ::)


biscot

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Reply #62 on: April 16, 2021, 02:19:16 am
I might prefer the pipes on the left (or on both sides) if I had a choice but it’s hard to find them on either side.
Seems like there’s enough Interceptors out there that there’d be more interest in building the pipes.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2021, 02:24:34 am by biscot »


AzCal Retred

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Reply #63 on: April 16, 2021, 08:05:28 am
I think the down pipes running under the engine (like the old SL350) are a good idea. they keep the exhaust hardware out of the way and add some crush cushion if you happen to plonk down on a biggo inconveniently placed rock. Piping is an easier fix than cases. You're not going to be deliberately rock-hopping with a 650 anyway. A "mixing chamber" below the motor might allow you to run a single pipe and SuperTrapp out & away, saving some weight & bulk.
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Fred Gassit

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Reply #64 on: April 16, 2021, 09:50:37 am
I suppose that's something to dislike if you're prone to disliking things. ;D
LOL! And once you dislike something, logic and reason no longer apply...
But that's the way of the internet for most of us I guess.  ;)


zimmemr

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Reply #65 on: April 16, 2021, 01:18:04 pm
I think the down pipes running under the engine (like the old SL350) are a good idea. they keep the exhaust hardware out of the way and add some crush cushion if you happen to plonk down on a biggo inconveniently placed rock. Piping is an easier fix than cases. You're not going to be deliberately rock-hopping with a 650 anyway. A "mixing chamber" below the motor might allow you to run a single pipe and SuperTrapp out & away, saving some weight & bulk.

IMO the SL was best looking of the 350's. A set of pipes like tey used would look great on the Interceptor. or maybe a baffled TT style set up for the hooligan's.


biscot

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Reply #66 on: April 16, 2021, 05:50:16 pm
What I'd love is a two-sided high-level exhaust with smallish silencers (what's a CAT?  :D) that could still accommodate the RE compact engine guards. I haven't seen anything like that available, but it doesn't seem like it would be that difficult for someone who did that sort of thing. I couldn't do the job myself but maybe I could find a custom builder who could do it. Maybe I could do some design work. Might even be a small market for it.
Anybody got a contact who might be interested?


NVDucati

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Reply #67 on: April 16, 2021, 06:27:09 pm
What I'd love is a two-sided high-level exhaust with smallish silencers (what's a CAT?  :D) that could still accommodate the RE compact engine guards. I haven't seen anything like that available, but it doesn't seem like it would be that difficult for someone who did that sort of thing. I couldn't do the job myself but maybe I could find a custom builder who could do it. Maybe I could do some design work. Might even be a small market for it.
Anybody got a contact who might be interested?

I don't know these shops. Just a internet search but they could be a starting point. There is a company named, Cone Engineering which sells pre-bent stainless and wedge sections, etc for them to work from. If they don't do exhausts, they know who does.

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biscot

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Reply #68 on: April 16, 2021, 06:29:45 pm
Thanks for the links. I'll check them out.
I've also started a new thread in case anyone's not following this one.


Hoiho

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Reply #69 on: April 16, 2021, 11:48:16 pm
Might be less hassle to rig up a butane torch that intermittently fires up and fries your leg?  ;D


biscot

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Reply #70 on: April 17, 2021, 01:50:44 am
No problem, I’ve already got plenty of scar tissue, doesn’t hurt anymore.


biscot

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Reply #71 on: April 18, 2021, 10:53:21 pm
For what it's worth, I've had what could be called a sanity episode, and have decided not to pursue this project.
I like my bike the way it is, and really don't want to beat it up (or my body either) on the rocky roads around here.
Besides, if I decide I really want to play in the dirt, there's lots of used 250 dirt bikes around here that I could probably pick up for less than the cost of modding this one.
Some thanks may be due to Jack Straw for adding a bit of sanity to my thinking with his "Now What" thread. I think I've done enough mods to my Interceptor.  ;) ;)
« Last Edit: April 18, 2021, 10:57:32 pm by biscot »


zimmemr

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Reply #72 on: April 18, 2021, 10:57:57 pm
For what it's worth, I've had what could be called a sanity episode, and have decided not to pursue this project.
I like my bike the way it is, and really don't want to beat it up (or my body either) on the rocky roads around here.
Besides, if I decide I really want to play in the dirt, there's lots of used 250 dirt bikes around here that I could probably pick up for less than the cost of modding this one.
Some thanks may be due to Jack Straw for adding a bit of sanity to my thinking with his "Now What" thread. I think I've done enough mods to my Interceptor.  ;) ;)
+1 smart thinking


NVDucati

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Reply #73 on: April 19, 2021, 12:03:39 am
For what it's worth, I've had what could be called a sanity episode, ....
Don't let your guard down. Sanity is a temporary condition.
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biscot

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Reply #74 on: April 19, 2021, 12:06:05 am
Rarer and rarer these days, it seems.


olhogrider

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Reply #75 on: April 19, 2021, 12:13:15 am
Don't let your guard down. Sanity is a temporary condition.
Thank god!


biscot

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Reply #76 on: April 19, 2021, 12:20:55 am
PS Olhogrider - I totally love the look of your bike. That took a lot of work! If I had two Interceptors, I'd do it for sure.


GravyDavy

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Reply #77 on: April 19, 2021, 01:29:31 am
I want to significantly lighten my Interceptor because that will make it more pleasant for the kind of back-road tootling I like to do. Next set of tires may or may not include allowing for some gravel/dirt road riding. If I stumble across some money, the suspension could be improved for rough roads. At the moment, I'm not looking for more power. No matter what, to me it's strength will always be in being cheap and cheerful, so I won't be throwing top-shelf components at it in an effort to make it a high-performance machine.