Author Topic: Chain and sprockets movement.  (Read 587 times)

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Riffhead

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on: January 12, 2021, 09:26:59 am
Hi everyone, I was cleaning my chain earlier and noticed the chain and sprockets move a few millimetres backwards and forwards whilst the rear wheel doesn't. Hope that makes sense, I'll poste a video just in case. Is this normal?
It's a Bullet 500 standard UCI


gizzo

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Reply #1 on: January 12, 2021, 11:43:34 am
its fine.
simon from south Australia
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Riffhead

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Reply #2 on: January 12, 2021, 11:52:22 am
ok thanks.


Haggis

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Reply #3 on: January 12, 2021, 12:12:10 pm
More than likely the cush drive rubbers in the rear wheel are past their best. Not too expensive and easy to replace. You can confirm by pressing the back brake on with one hand and see if you can rock the rear wheel back and forward with the other. Ideally there should be be no movement. If there s a bit of play you will feel it as being a snatchy when you are on and off the throttle.
Off route, recalculate?


Riffhead

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Reply #4 on: January 13, 2021, 10:47:51 am
Hi everyone, I was cleaning my chain earlier and noticed the chain and sprockets move a few millimetres backwards and forwards whilst the rear wheel doesn't. Hope that makes sense, I'll poste a video just in case. Is this normal?
It's a Bullet 500 standard UCE 2019.

here's the link for the video.   
https://youtu.be/posRO-CmFrk


Haggis

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« Last Edit: January 13, 2021, 12:26:06 pm by Haggis »
Off route, recalculate?


gizzo

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Reply #6 on: January 13, 2021, 09:55:22 pm
Mmmm, thats more sloppy than I imagined when I read your 1st post. +1,new cush rubbers should sort it out. But still, that much play is not a show stopper.
simon from south Australia
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DRZ400SM


Guaire

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Reply #7 on: January 14, 2021, 12:20:47 am
ACE Motors - sales & administration


Riffhead

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Reply #8 on: January 14, 2021, 09:46:19 am
Thanks for your responses, I'll be changing the tyres within the next 6 month's I'll sort it out then.


axman88

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Reply #9 on: January 16, 2021, 04:37:24 am
Please post a picture of whatever you find, for educational purposes, when you get to it.  That is quite a lot of play.

Taking the wheel off goes very quickly, by the way.

I put the bike up on it's center stand on top of a piece of wood, (I found a slab 2.25" thick was sufficient for my 2012 C5 with 18" rear)  Pull the cotter pin and remove the axle nut.  Pull the axle out, catching the long spacer.  Separate the wheel from the brake drum/ sprocket.  My wheel requires a bit of worrying, but with that amount of slop, your's should come off easily.

Pulling the brake drum is only a bit more work from this point.  So far, I have found work on my RE goes much quicker and easier than any other motorcycle I've ever worked on.


Haggis

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Reply #10 on: January 16, 2021, 10:55:25 am
Axman88, from the video the op posted it looks like he has a euro4 bike with disc rear brake. So my suggestion of holding the brake on and rocking the wheel won't work. He has held the brake and rocked the sprocket to show the play. The wheel still sits in the cush drive rubbers the same as euro3 though. Once he has the axle bolt and rear brake caliper out the wheel should pull of the sprocket carrier easily.
Off route, recalculate?


Riffhead

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Reply #11 on: January 16, 2021, 08:30:12 pm
Your spot on HAGGIS euro 4 and when I hold the brake on the wheel doesn't move. But I kind of understood that's because its a disc brake. I'll post a video or photo's when I change the tyres and cush rubbers. It's very satisfying to be able to work on these bikes at home. For info I've done 20000kms in 18 months I use it all year round to got to work and other stuff. It's the first problem I've had.  8)


Riffhead

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Reply #12 on: February 11, 2021, 03:19:52 pm
So I ordered the cush rubbers and a new back tyre. The back wheel comes off ok, I took the rear brake pads off first to manipulate the wheel out easier, they come out super easy. Took about 2 minutes to swap out the cush rubbers. 24 euros for the 4 cush rubbers. The old ones did look a bit knackered, haven't put the wheel back on yet as I m taking it to a garage to have the tyre swapped out tomorrow. Will let you know if it does the trick.
Link to cush rubbers if people dont know what they look like.
https://youtu.be/g33e1-INPrI