Author Topic: Meteor in the USA in Spring?  (Read 3252 times)

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AzCal Retred

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Reply #30 on: December 10, 2020, 05:14:19 pm
Re: Richard230 @ # 28:
What's the KTM 390 Duke all about? What's it like to live with?
They look like a very nice lightweight weekend sport bike - are they more? Can you take 2-4 day jaunts?
I've seen several in the $2800 - $3500 range used - do they hold up or are they fragile? Is the engine "done" at 30,000?
I've not had a chance to ride one yet, but they do look fun! - ACR -
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


Richard230

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Reply #31 on: December 10, 2020, 10:20:28 pm
Re: Richard230 @ # 28:
What's the KTM 390 Duke all about? What's it like to live with?
They look like a very nice lightweight weekend sport bike - are they more? Can you take 2-4 day jaunts?
I've seen several in the $2800 - $3500 range used - do they hold up or are they fragile? Is the engine "done" at 30,000?
I've not had a chance to ride one yet, but they do look fun! - ACR -

I only have about 1300 miles on my Duke so far. It runs fine under a load and will hit 100mph. It easily cruises at 80. But the engine is kind of "frantic" and is not much fun around town as it really doesn't like to operate at slow speeds and low throttle openings. The bike is more of a toy than something that is practical for everyday usage. Engine maintenance is pretty involved with something like three different oil filters and drain plugs. The 600-mile servicing required major work, including a full valve lash inspection, a coolant change and a firmware update, along with all of the other stuff you would expect from an initial service. The cost of that service was $650, which was a real surprise to me as I had expected just a oil and filter change and a chassis inspection. That level of major service is scheduled every 9.3K miles. However, the bike does get good fuel mileage. I average about 65mpg, using premium fuel.  Frankly, if I was buying a bike to use every day and one that didn't require much servicing, within that price and performance range, I would have bought one of the Kawasaki 400 models.  As far as the Duke's engine life, I have no idea. I doubt I will keep it long enough to wear out the engine, though.  ;)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


20MarkIII

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Reply #32 on: December 13, 2020, 05:49:26 pm
Re: 20MarkIII @ # 27:
Sounds like we're on the same wavelength.
I believe it's important for a "learner" to have a small bike as it gives them greater control over the machine. Picking it up after a drop is an important skill in it's own right, Braking & shifting coordination are tough enough to learn for most folks without balancing 400+ pounds of hardware as well. A powerful machine can get a new rider into trouble, as it can shove them into situations beyond what their existing skill levels can resolve. I think the old Honda Twinstar is a great training platform. It zips around city streets well enough, virtually everyone can keep it upright at a stop sign, and it's fully capable of day-long backroad meanders, enough to whet the appetite of new riders to keep on with the hobby. As far as freeway, new riders don't need to be mixing it up at 75 anyway, save that for a nice 500/650. You can learn everything you need to know at 15 - 35 MPH. The rest is acquired through more practice & gradual acclimation to greater speed.
Good to hear from you! - ACR -
Funny you mention the Twinstar. Just saw one of those listed on CL as well. Super low miles and around $1600.00. Nice thing about Honda is that parts are usually available for older bikes. I'd kind of forgotten what a neat smaller bike the Twinstars are and an ideal platform for the new rider. I wish RE all the best on their new Meteor. I will make it a point to check them out when available here.


zimmemr

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Reply #33 on: December 15, 2020, 02:54:42 am
No matter how good the Meteor is or isn't is almost beside the point in the US, especially if their aim is to engage new riders. The larger issue, especially in this case is that there just aren't enough dealers and customer service seems to be spotty. I live in Connecticut, an affluent state with strong motorcycle sales. In the entire state there are only two RE dealers, and one is only open three days a week for about 6 hours a day. The other shop is on the North East border on the CT-Mass line about as far from the wealthier part of the state as you can get. The nearest out of state dealers are in NYC and Albany respectively, which puts them out of reach of most CT residents. Meanwhile Honda dealers are just about everywhere, as are most of the metric brands and they all advertise heavily so any prospective newbie is more likely to head to one of them.

Unless the RE dealer network expands, at least in Connecticut, the brand is going to remain somewhat of a "cult" bike, no matter how good they are. And that's especially true if RENA allows dealers to be open part time, and doesn't take customer service as seriously as many of the other manufacturers. FWIW I spent 30 years in the motorcycle business, ten of them as a dealer principle in a multiline shop that sold Suzuki, Yamaha, BMW, Moto Guzzi and Ducati, so I do have some understanding of how a motorcycle business should be run. I guess I should also mention that I do own two RE's, a Himalayan and an Interceptor.


Richard230

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Reply #34 on: December 15, 2020, 02:52:26 pm
No matter how good the Meteor is or isn't is almost beside the point in the US, especially if their aim is to engage new riders. The larger issue, especially in this case is that there just aren't enough dealers and customer service seems to be spotty. I live in Connecticut, an affluent state with strong motorcycle sales. In the entire state there are only two RE dealers, and one is only open three days a week for about 6 hours a day. The other shop is on the North East border on the CT-Mass line about as far from the wealthier part of the state as you can get. The nearest out of state dealers are in NYC and Albany respectively, which puts them out of reach of most CT residents. Meanwhile Honda dealers are just about everywhere, as are most of the metric brands and they all advertise heavily so any prospective newbie is more likely to head to one of them.

Unless the RE dealer network expands, at least in Connecticut, the brand is going to remain somewhat of a "cult" bike, no matter how good they are. And that's especially true if RENA allows dealers to be open part time, and doesn't take customer service as seriously as many of the other manufacturers. FWIW I spent 30 years in the motorcycle business, ten of them as a dealer principle in a multiline shop that sold Suzuki, Yamaha, BMW, Moto Guzzi and Ducati, so I do have some understanding of how a motorcycle business should be run. I guess I should also mention that I do own two RE's, a Himalayan and an Interceptor.

The other problem that I see is that the few dealers in California that I know of are multi-brand shops and are more likely to steer customers to their other more established brands that perhaps generate more profit from them then to the RE models.
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


zimmemr

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Reply #35 on: December 15, 2020, 04:35:08 pm
The other problem that I see is that the few dealers in California that I know of are multi-brand shops and are more likely to steer customers to their other more established brands that perhaps generate more profit from them then to the RE models.

Agreed, especially the shops that carry a Japan Inc. line. I worked for a shop that carried Royal Enfield in the late 60's it was the same then. The salesmen would show the guy a new Interceptor, then sell him a Norton. It's real shame, they make a great all around motorcycle, If I was younger I wouldn't think twice about opening an RE shop, of course if I was younger I'd be broke...


AzCal Retred

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Reply #36 on: January 05, 2021, 11:19:05 pm
Royal Enfield to Bring Meteor 350 Cruiser to US in 2021

https://www.cycleworld.com/story/bikes/2021-royal-enfield-meteor-350-first-look/

Royal Enfield has been making headway in the US market lately, so it’s great to see it continue to expand its product lineup. The Meteor 350′s closest competition is the Honda Rebel 300, which retails at $4,599, so we’d imagine the Royal Enfield will come in significantly below that. Expect it to land in US dealerships in the spring of 2021.


xxxxxxx
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


20MarkIII

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Reply #37 on: January 21, 2021, 12:09:15 pm
So I took the click bait from a Chicago RE dealer and inquired about price on the Meteor. No announced USA price yet but they are "happy" to take deposits on the bikes which may be available sometime in February ::). I do want to see one in the flesh. Just not in Chicago...


AzCal Retred

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Reply #38 on: January 21, 2021, 06:31:14 pm
Chicago? March? No problem. Put 2 of these bad boys in your pockets and all's well.

https://www.amazon.com/Peacock-Japanese-Platinum-Catalyst-Warmer/dp/B009T0QDF8

I've heard using a few 3/8" hex-head sheet metal screws in your tire tread works to alleviate skidding as well...  ;D

Personally, 55 degrees F ( 13 C for the rest of humanity ) is my lower limit!  - ACR -
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


zimmemr

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Reply #39 on: January 21, 2021, 11:01:33 pm

I've heard using a few 3/8" hex-head sheet metal screws in your tire tread works to alleviate skidding as well...  ;D

Kold cutters work way better and don't round off so quickly ;)


AzCal Retred

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Reply #40 on: January 22, 2021, 12:26:33 am
You are DOUBLE-TUFF my friend!!   :)

Doesn't look like nearly enough clothes. But, that's the great Alaskan dilemma - 4" of snowsuit and 2" of .......!   ;D ;D ;D
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


20MarkIII

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Reply #41 on: January 22, 2021, 02:47:06 am
Chicago? March? No problem. Put 2 of these bad boys in your pockets and all's well.

https://www.amazon.com/Peacock-Japanese-Platinum-Catalyst-Warmer/dp/B009T0QDF8

I've heard using a few 3/8" hex-head sheet metal screws in your tire tread works to alleviate skidding as well...  ;D

Personally, 55 degrees F ( 13 C for the rest of humanity ) is my lower limit!  - ACR -
OMGoodness, haven't seen those in years! I had one for deer hunting I think was the Jon E brand. They can get REALLY hot but uncomfortably so in like one spot. Plus they stink. Whitetails have very keen olfactory sense. The thin shakeup type Hot Hands are much more manageable. I spoke with my Indy Dealer right before Christmas and he plans on ordering a few Meteors for short leg riders who are uncomfortable sitting on the RE twins. I was just trying to get the US price to report here. So far no joy.


zimmemr

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Reply #42 on: January 22, 2021, 03:04:56 am
You are DOUBLE-TUFF my friend!!   :)

Doesn't look like nearly enough clothes. But, that's the great Alaskan dilemma - 4" of snowsuit and 2" of .......!   ;D ;D ;D

As far as riding goes there's not much else we can do here in the winter. ;)


Richard230

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Reply #43 on: January 22, 2021, 02:02:10 pm
OMGoodness, haven't seen those in years! I had one for deer hunting I think was the Jon E brand. They can get REALLY hot but uncomfortably so in like one spot. Plus they stink. Whitetails have very keen olfactory sense. The thin shakeup type Hot Hands are much more manageable. I spoke with my Indy Dealer right before Christmas and he plans on ordering a few Meteors for short leg riders who are uncomfortable sitting on the RE twins. I was just trying to get the US price to report here. So far no joy.

I figure that the Meteor's price in the U.S. will be whatever the dealers believe the market will bear.  ::)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


zimmemr

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Reply #44 on: January 22, 2021, 08:12:19 pm
I figure that the Meteor's price in the U.S. will be whatever the dealers believe the market will bear.  ::)

To me the larger issue is whether RENA will force the dealer network to step up and actively market the bike and the RE brand, or whether they'll just let it languish. In my town the RE dealer is open three days a week for 6 hours a day. The Honda shop is open six days a week, 9 hours a day. Where do you think a newbie will find it easier to buy a bike? Let alone get better aftersales support.