Author Topic: Meteor in the USA in Spring?  (Read 3251 times)

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derottone

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Reply #15 on: November 30, 2020, 10:47:30 pm
DCT = dual clutch transmission, two gears engaged at the same time, gear shifting happens by disengaging clutch one and closing clutch two. It sure can be shifted manually by wire. I don't remember seeing on the African Twin a shifter neither clutch lever. Maybe there might be somewhere buttons that you can use to select the gear? Once the gearbox is operated by wire, the ECU can do the shifting too and you might be able to select a shift program.

Main reason for its existence is the efficiency that was at the beginning a lot better than a automatic gearbox with a torque converter. They have too become better and are probably equally efficient today.

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Richard230

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Reply #16 on: November 30, 2020, 10:59:06 pm
What sticks with me most about trikes in general is how they tumble like footballs once they roll. Wheelbase & CG I'm sure have a lot to do with it.
Is the "7-speed" Gold Wing an Automatic transmission? I've chased a few Fiat Cinquecentos with 6-speed auto's and they moved along just fine.

It has the usual Honda Dual Clutch Transmission that can automatically shift gears by its computer, or you can manually shift gears with a paddle. Just like many expensive sports cars. The 1100cc Rebel has a similar gearbox, but with only 5-speeds. It is a $700 upgrade from the base shift-it-yourself gearbox model. 
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #17 on: December 02, 2020, 01:07:02 am
Seven Meteor Colours - scroll down after site opens - tab left/right. 360 views of bike in each colour... ;D

https://www.royalenfield.com/in/en/motorcycles/meteor/
« Last Edit: December 02, 2020, 01:10:44 am by AzCal Retred »
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


derottone

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Reply #18 on: December 03, 2020, 01:40:08 pm
I kind of have an idea what to do should I see one of those things around.  ;D
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20MarkIII

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Reply #19 on: December 05, 2020, 03:05:39 am
HD ought to take lessons from RE. That yellow Fireball is just plain sharp to my eye. Have heard that RE will create a classic style on the Meteor platform as well. Lots of interesting things going on at Royal Enfield! :)


derottone

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Reply #20 on: December 06, 2020, 11:38:30 am
HD? Nothing is capable of replacing cc's, when it comes to HD a set of pedals might do.  ::)

Don't know how it's in the States but the HD riders in Sweden are definitely into guys those days, without any doubt.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2020, 12:26:57 pm by derottone »
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derottone

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Reply #21 on: December 06, 2020, 01:25:37 pm
Kind of poor SoBs, working 24/7 with output = zero, I guess that must cause a lot of frustration.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2020, 01:27:43 pm by derottone »
"Proles and Animals are free"
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #22 on: December 09, 2020, 06:06:30 pm

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor first look  -  Andy Greaser -   Nov 12, 2020

https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/royal-enfield-debuts-the-meteor-350#:~:text=Say%20hello%20to%20the%202021,in%20the%20spring%20of%202021.

The Meteor largely replaces the Thunderbird 350, a model not sold in the United States but the best-selling cruiser in India for the last 20 years, according to Royal Enfield head Siddhartha Lal.

The new standards killed off Royal Enfield's iconic Bullet mill, ending an era for the storied Enfield thumper and prompting the creation of a new model to carry the brand's single-cylinder legacy forward. Say hello to the 2021 Meteor 350. Royal Enfield has confirmed the Meteor is coming to North America in the spring of 2021.

The Meteor largely replaces the Thunderbird 350, a model not sold in the United States but the best-selling cruiser in India for the last 20 years, according to Royal Enfield head Siddhartha Lal.
“The Thunderbird was crucial to our ambition to evolve from a one-model manufacturer and to change the perception of our brand with the emerging demographic exemplified by the upwardly mobile IT professional in Bangalore,” writes Lal. “We used our new lean-burn engine with an all new five-speed gearbox, and for the first time [in 2002], moved the gear shifting on an Enfield to the left side of the motorcycle (gasp!).”

The Meteor will be RE’s first bike on the new, double-cradle “J” platform, and its three variants (Fireball, Stellar and Supernova) are mostly cosmetic variations. "Sure-footed handling and luxurious comfort are aided by 41 mm forks with 130 mm of travel and twin tube emulsion shock absorbers with six-step adjustable preload at the rear," says RE. Controls are the farthest forward of any RE model. The overall appearance suggests a Bullet/Thunderbird crossed with an older Japanese cruiserette, with a pinch of recent Triumph. RE’s styling has become increasingly slick in recent years. Did you know they hired Ducati's Pierre Terblanche to pen the Himalayan?

In addition to mandatory ABS, this simple motorcycle has one tech piece that comes standard: Royal Enfield’s new Tripper navigation system, a small pod in the instrument cluster that shows turn-by-turn navigation. Riders set trip parameters with RE’s app via Bluetooth. The miniature TFT display dedicates most of its screen to arrows that change color and flash as the next turn approaches. It reminds me of Beeline’s smart nav unit that took Kickstarter by storm a few years back.

Tripper marks RE’s first foray into inexpensive nav systems, an especially desirable feature for technophile Indian customers, and I have to think we’ll see the Google-powered Tripper units on other RE models soon. It wouldn’t be too hard to spin off as a universal accessory, either. The USB port on the side of the pod allows the riders to charge a phone and other gadgets. (Hey, motorcycle industry! If Royal Enfield can include a USB port from the factory, you can, too.) One last tech nicety isn't on the bike, but online: a collection of free, high-quality YouTube videos covering all basic maintenance for this model.

“It was a tough and heart-wrenching decision to let go of the Thunderbird brand for all of us at Royal Enfield," writes Lal. "However, in order to once again redefine the cruiser market in India, and to take our unique Royal Enfield style of cruising to the world, we are rekindling a brand that is instantly recognizable as an ‘RE’, as well as a single brand that we can use around the world."
Price will be one of the Meteor’s main strengths, as it retails for around $2,400 in India. Royal Enfield hasn't officially told us the U.S. price yet, but some back-of-the-napkin math puts that number closer to $4,200 for the U.S. market, using the Himalayan’s prices for comparison. The Meteor could be a compelling option for riders seeking classic style, turn-by-turn navigation, simple mechanicals, and beginner-friendly power for under $5,000. A meatier Meteor based on their INT 650 twin would probably do even better.





 
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


20MarkIII

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Reply #23 on: December 10, 2020, 01:16:24 am
Well it seems the Meteor is officially released in the UK. Andy 'Missenden Flyer' made the announcement today on his YT channel. Price: 3749 (I think) British pounds. Funny, he likes the yellow Fireball best too. RE has offered him the opportunity to test ride when stock is sufficient.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #24 on: December 10, 2020, 02:00:31 am
3750 BPS x 1.3 = $4875 USD

I'm hoping the $4200 USD or less is the number over here. $4900 would be very close to the Himalayan price. If you're intent is to get hardware out the door...

Any idea what the Honda H'ness and Jawa Perak are going for? Those look like real competition.


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20MarkIII

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Reply #25 on: December 10, 2020, 02:41:47 am
I could be wrong AzCal but don't think the H'ness or Jawa are available here in the US. Also, it seems I remember some British reviewers of the Interceptor quoting 5600 pounds there while our prices here were $5799 USD. And of course about half of that in India. I still think if RE wants to actually SELL Meteors here they will need to undercut the Rebel 300 price substantially. Time will tell. I recently saw an ad on CL for an '08 S40 with 7700 miles listed for $1650.00. A few others for $2000-$2200. If you want a thumper maybe get one that will at least do highway speed. The Meteor is just so darned good looking! :)


AzCal Retred

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Reply #26 on: December 10, 2020, 04:32:19 am
You were saying the Meteor in the UK was released at about 3750 Pounds/4880 USD. I was interested to see how it compared to the other new "classics" over there, the H'ness & Perak.

UK interceptors at 5600 GBP is about $7300 USD. You were saying our Interceptors were about $5800.
5800/7300 = 80% of the UK price.
$4880 x 0.8 = $3900 USD

So with luck, the Meteor should be a $3900 - $4300 machine Stateside.

The 300 Rebel runs about $4500, Kawasaki Z400 is around $4900, the XV250 is about $4500. If RE can keep the Meteor close to $4000 they should fly off the shelves IMHO.

Your point about the bargain that used bikes present is valid for folks willing to turn a wrench & educate themselves about the hardware. New bike buyers often want that hands-off guaranteed appliance-like reliability. I think RE will need a $300-$500 cushion to lure the mechanically declined over to the non-Japanese "darkside".

A good Suzuki 650 V-Strom or nice TDM850 for about $2500 - $3500 is more up my alley... ;D
« Last Edit: December 10, 2020, 04:52:01 am by AzCal Retred »
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


20MarkIII

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Reply #27 on: December 10, 2020, 10:39:22 am
You were saying the Meteor in the UK was released at about 3750 Pounds/4880 USD. I was interested to see how it compared to the other new "classics" over there, the H'ness & Perak.

UK interceptors at 5600 GBP is about $7300 USD. You were saying our Interceptors were about $5800.
5800/7300 = 80% of the UK price.
$4880 x 0.8 = $3900 USD

So with luck, the Meteor should be a $3900 - $4300 machine Stateside.

The 300 Rebel runs about $4500, Kawasaki Z400 is around $4900, the XV250 is about $4500. If RE can keep the Meteor close to $4000 they should fly off the shelves IMHO.

Your point about the bargain that used bikes present is valid for folks willing to turn a wrench & educate themselves about the hardware. New bike buyers often want that hands-off guaranteed appliance-like reliability. I think RE will need a $300-$500 cushion to lure the mechanically declined over to the non-Japanese "darkside".

A good Suzuki 650 V-Strom or nice TDM850 for about $2500 - $3500 is more up my alley... ;D
Ahh, I got ya. Don't have any idea what the H'ness and Parek sell for in the UK. I agree with you on your other points completely. I will add that I always advise a potential new rider to buy used or NOS from a dealer because they may not like motorcycling once they try it. Also, I think new riders benefit from starting with a smallish bike. The Interceptor has such a smooth clutch and is so well balanced it IMO is a great starter bike that is also very capable at highway speeds. I'm a bit disappointed that the Meteor doesn't have an assist and slipper clutch. The H'Ness does.


Richard230

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Reply #28 on: December 10, 2020, 02:37:50 pm
The problem that I have with U.S. motorcycle prices (at least around here) is that dealers add various unexpected fees to the MSRP. In the SF Bay Area those fees will be between $300 and $1000, apparently depending upon what the dealer believes what the popularity of the model is, will be, or should be.  ::)  And then there is the dreaded "destination" (shipping) and "set-up" charges, as well as various and random state and local taxes and fees. Buying a motorcycle is starting to feel like flying on a commercial airliner - before the demand went off a cliff.

When I bought my KTM 390 Duke, the MSRP was a reasonable $5,400. But then the dealer added a $500 set-up charge and an $800 shipping fee (apparently shipping from India is a lot more expensive than shipping from Japan  ::) )  And there there was the electronic-filing (paperless) DMV fee, state and local taxes, state vehicle license registration fee and probably some sort of environmental-protection fee, all added to the base price of the vehicle. By the time I got out of the shop, my little $5,400 Duke ended up costing me $7,800!

So I wonder what people will actually be paying for the Meteor, at least in California, by the time they manage to push it out of the dealer's door? Especially, if there is an obvious demand (supported by actual cash deposits) for the Meteor.
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #29 on: December 10, 2020, 05:06:03 pm
Re: 20MarkIII @ # 27:
Sounds like we're on the same wavelength.
I believe it's important for a "learner" to have a small bike as it gives them greater control over the machine. Picking it up after a drop is an important skill in it's own right, Braking & shifting coordination are tough enough to learn for most folks without balancing 400+ pounds of hardware as well. A powerful machine can get a new rider into trouble, as it can shove them into situations beyond what their existing skill levels can resolve. I think the old Honda Twinstar is a great training platform. It zips around city streets well enough, virtually everyone can keep it upright at a stop sign, and it's fully capable of day-long backroad meanders, enough to whet the appetite of new riders to keep on with the hobby. As far as freeway, new riders don't need to be mixing it up at 75 anyway, save that for a nice 500/650. You can learn everything you need to know at 15 - 35 MPH. The rest is acquired through more practice & gradual acclimation to greater speed.
Good to hear from you! - ACR -
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.