Author Topic: Meteor in the USA in Spring?  (Read 3253 times)

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AzCal Retred

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on: November 26, 2020, 04:49:14 pm
http://www.motorcycledaily.com/2020/11/royal-enfield-meteor-a-new-350-single-debuts/
>>> We understand from RE that the Meteor 350 will be available in U.S. dealers next spring, but we have not heard anything on the pricing. <<<

https://ultimatemotorcycling.com/2020/11/12/2021-royal-enfield-meteor-350-first-look-7-fast-facts-specs-photos/
>>> Although we don’t have prices, we do know that the 2021 Royal Enfield Meteor 350 won’t be in America until the spring. <<<

The Meteor India price is about 90% of the Himalayan and 65% of the Interceptor.
USA 2021 Himalayan $5000; x 0.9 = $4500     
USA 2021 Interceptor $5800 - $6600 ; $3800 - $4300

So, arriving maybe February, guesstimated cost at an initial $4500, dropping to $4000 or less as the novelty factor wears off? Operators are standing by.... :)
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


Bilgemaster

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Reply #1 on: November 27, 2020, 02:20:03 am
Thanks for the links, AzCal Retread. If I were to get another Enfield, it would most likely be a well-kept but used Interceptor. I guess I'm just never gonna be a "new car smell" kinda guy. One thing about this new crop of Meteors though: I do wish this current vogue for blacked out engine cases would subside. I like a nice polished alloy. That whole matt black thing just seems dreary and funereal to my old peepers...Also, must EVERY ride be blacked out. It's sorta become predictable and mediocre now, like only having beige computers back in the '90s, y'know? If they're gonna paint those cases, how about mixing up the palette just a bit? For example, I don't hate my old Bullet "Military's" green.
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.

(Legal enough to pass muster if they don't look too closely in Woodbridge, Virginia, where the buses don't run at night, holidays or weekends and I'm a contender for 'Village Idiot')


Richard230

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Reply #2 on: November 27, 2020, 02:10:38 pm
It has been my observation over 58 years of buying new motorcycles that black is the most popular color of motorcycle enthusiasts. So the manufacturers just give their customers what they want.  Personally, I prefer lime green, but then I like to think of myself as not a typical motorcycle purchaser.  ;)
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20MarkIII

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Reply #3 on: November 27, 2020, 02:30:01 pm
The 2021 Honda Rebel 300 has a MSRP of $4599.00 in the US. It will be interesting to see what RE has up their sleeve for pricing for the Meteor. Oh, FWIW Honda is releasing a Rebel 1100 for '21.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #4 on: November 28, 2020, 12:35:48 am
Rebel 1100? There are several very nice old Yamaha TDM850's for $2000 - $4000 on the used market. those appeal to me if I was going to spend real money. A nice skinny big twin with comfortable riding position, proper wheels and suspension that allow it to deal with bad pavement, often coming equipped with very nice luggage from the PO. A 5-valve short-stroke TDM850 will run fast enough to terrify a sane person. https://adventuremotorcycle.com/bikes/backtrack-tuesdays-yamaha-tdm850-review
https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/yamaha/yamaha_tdm850%2096.htm

New buyers are buying reliability and dealer back up, things I work around as I need to. I believe the Meteor will sell well to new/downsizing? riders if R.E. can keep the price around $4,000. It's rather what they did for the Himalayan and Interceptor, put out a good product at an affordable price. Not many of us need or can truly deal with a 170+ MPH Hayabusa or ZX14.

As far as black, well:
1) paint is cheaper than chrome
2) REAL racers have black motors
3) Bad Boaz ride black motorcycles (or as my wife calls them "Mal Derrières") ;D
4) Not too much polishing required for black paint
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


20MarkIII

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Reply #5 on: November 28, 2020, 03:56:50 pm
Rebel 1100? There are several very nice old Yamaha TDM850's for $2000 - $4000 on the used market. those appeal to me if I was going to spend real money. A nice skinny big twin with comfortable riding position, proper wheels and suspension that allow it to deal with bad pavement, often coming equipped with very nice luggage from the PO. A 5-valve short-stroke TDM850 will run fast enough to terrify a sane person. https://adventuremotorcycle.com/bikes/backtrack-tuesdays-yamaha-tdm850-review
https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/yamaha/yamaha_tdm850%2096.htm

New buyers are buying reliability and dealer back up, things I work around as I need to. I believe the Meteor will sell well to new/downsizing? riders if R.E. can keep the price around $4,000. It's rather what they did for the Himalayan and Interceptor, put out a good product at an affordable price. Not many of us need or can truly deal with a 170+ MPH Hayabusa or ZX14.

As far as black, well:
1) paint is cheaper than chrome
2) REAL racers have black motors
3) Bad Boaz ride black motorcycles (or as my wife calls them "Mal Derrières") ;D
4) Not too much polishing required for black paint
I mentioned the Rebel 1100 as an aside. The Rebel 300 may be the Meteor's main competition here in the US. I agree with you that at $3995.00 USD the Fireball would be mighty tempting. But true also is that the real bargains are well kept used bikes. Just like cars. Of the dozen road bikes I've owned only two were new. But the privilege of properly running in, maintaining and detailing a beautiful new machine comes with a price. I have no regrets to have paid that price for my INT 650. Love it!


Bilgemaster

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Reply #6 on: November 28, 2020, 08:30:38 pm
The 2021 Honda Rebel 300 has a MSRP of $4599.00 in the US. It will be interesting to see what RE has up their sleeve for pricing for the Meteor. Oh, FWIW Honda is releasing a Rebel 1100 for '21.

Here in the USA, perhaps just from the sheer force of inertia of "just get a Rebel", new or used, as being almost the default recommendation as THE best "starter bike" for new riders, owing perhaps in part to their being the once almost ubiquitous offering on MSF riding  courses, I'm sure that littlest Honda Rebel will always enjoy enough satisfactory sales here for Honda to keep grinding them out.

A couple of the many local police forces in Washington, D.C. also mounted hordes  of their their cops on tons of their 250 predecessors back in the '90s, which only now seem to be getting phased out, which must be a huge testament to their reliability. I've often admired those little cop rides as being just the thing for city or suburban traffic. Nevertheless, it seems that most of the reviews I've seen lately on the 300 Rebel, while giving it its deserved kudos, almost never fail to mention a certain "buyer's remorse" within a year or so of purchase for not having gone a bit bigger with their 500 in the first place.

Royal Enfield might do well to take a lesson from this, and also the lackluster sales of their 350s here back in the '90s, for their new Meteor line, and maybe squeeze out a 500, or better yet their accustomed 535, for their Western export markets. I might be perfectly content to poke around on their 350, but then I'm happily nursing around one of their original "Iron Belly" Bullet 500s. Clearly raw velocity ain't really  my "thing" preferring "character" over heft, but I do expect most might prefer something just a tad beefier. And I've already got that nice Google Lady telling me where to turn. I don't want or need "Der Tripper."
« Last Edit: November 28, 2020, 09:46:00 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.

(Legal enough to pass muster if they don't look too closely in Woodbridge, Virginia, where the buses don't run at night, holidays or weekends and I'm a contender for 'Village Idiot')


Richard230

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Reply #7 on: November 28, 2020, 10:45:18 pm
Speaking of the new Honda Rebel 1100, check out the comments published by Revzilla regarding the engine. Each cylinder apparently is tuned differently, with one cylinder making more power at low revs and the other cylinder making more power at higher revs. I am not quite sure what to make of that.  ??? 
https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/2021-honda-rebel-1100-first-look?
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derottone

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Reply #8 on: November 30, 2020, 02:09:11 pm
Seems to be the latest technological outcry, even the super duper complex double clutch gearbox is there. So your life gets spared from the bothersome gear shifting.
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Richard230

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Reply #9 on: November 30, 2020, 04:41:00 pm
Seems to be the latest technological outcry, even the super duper complex double clutch gearbox is there. So your life gets spared from the bothersome gear shifting.

That article also mentioned that the new Honda Gold Wing has a 7-speed DCT. Just what that bike needs. 7-speeds.   ::)  (Although, maybe one is a reverse?  ???  )
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #10 on: November 30, 2020, 07:04:32 pm
Looks like it's ready to be transplanted into a kit car...
https://carbuzz.com/features/7-amazing-kit-cars-to-build-in-your-own-garage
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derottone

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Reply #11 on: November 30, 2020, 07:31:13 pm
Looks like it's ready to be transplanted into a kit car...
https://carbuzz.com/features/7-amazing-kit-cars-to-build-in-your-own-garage

Automatic in a fun car is like alcohol free beer. Some like it.
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #12 on: November 30, 2020, 08:02:50 pm
Power to weight, baby, it's all about power to weight... 8)

The 'Wing likely has some kind of reverse hidden in there. A ZX14 would probably be faster, but pushing your car backwards out of every parking space would get old. I don't know 'nuttin' about the new crop of trikes, I assume they're fast also?
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derottone

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Reply #13 on: November 30, 2020, 09:22:17 pm
Power to weight, baby, it's all about power to weight... 8)

The 'Wing likely has some kind of reverse hidden in there. A ZX14 would probably be faster, but pushing your car backwards out of every parking space would get old. I don't know 'nuttin' about the new crop of trikes, I assume they're fast also?

Fun car is not only about power to weight. The manual Wing GL1600 in a Locost 7 has found a room in my fantasy cabinet already some time back. Good sound too with 6 cylinders.

Three wheelers are kinda crap around corners, only one I like is the Morgan. That could be fun on small trips. They charging ridiculous amounts of money for it though.
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #14 on: November 30, 2020, 10:11:32 pm
What sticks with me most about trikes in general is how they tumble like footballs once they roll. Wheelbase & CG I'm sure have a lot to do with it.
Is the "7-speed" Gold Wing an Automatic transmission? I've chased a few Fiat Cinquecentos with 6-speed auto's and they moved along just fine.
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


derottone

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Reply #15 on: November 30, 2020, 10:47:30 pm
DCT = dual clutch transmission, two gears engaged at the same time, gear shifting happens by disengaging clutch one and closing clutch two. It sure can be shifted manually by wire. I don't remember seeing on the African Twin a shifter neither clutch lever. Maybe there might be somewhere buttons that you can use to select the gear? Once the gearbox is operated by wire, the ECU can do the shifting too and you might be able to select a shift program.

Main reason for its existence is the efficiency that was at the beginning a lot better than a automatic gearbox with a torque converter. They have too become better and are probably equally efficient today.

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Richard230

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Reply #16 on: November 30, 2020, 10:59:06 pm
What sticks with me most about trikes in general is how they tumble like footballs once they roll. Wheelbase & CG I'm sure have a lot to do with it.
Is the "7-speed" Gold Wing an Automatic transmission? I've chased a few Fiat Cinquecentos with 6-speed auto's and they moved along just fine.

It has the usual Honda Dual Clutch Transmission that can automatically shift gears by its computer, or you can manually shift gears with a paddle. Just like many expensive sports cars. The 1100cc Rebel has a similar gearbox, but with only 5-speeds. It is a $700 upgrade from the base shift-it-yourself gearbox model. 
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #17 on: December 02, 2020, 01:07:02 am
Seven Meteor Colours - scroll down after site opens - tab left/right. 360 views of bike in each colour... ;D

https://www.royalenfield.com/in/en/motorcycles/meteor/
« Last Edit: December 02, 2020, 01:10:44 am by AzCal Retred »
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derottone

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Reply #18 on: December 03, 2020, 01:40:08 pm
I kind of have an idea what to do should I see one of those things around.  ;D
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20MarkIII

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Reply #19 on: December 05, 2020, 03:05:39 am
HD ought to take lessons from RE. That yellow Fireball is just plain sharp to my eye. Have heard that RE will create a classic style on the Meteor platform as well. Lots of interesting things going on at Royal Enfield! :)


derottone

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Reply #20 on: December 06, 2020, 11:38:30 am
HD? Nothing is capable of replacing cc's, when it comes to HD a set of pedals might do.  ::)

Don't know how it's in the States but the HD riders in Sweden are definitely into guys those days, without any doubt.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2020, 12:26:57 pm by derottone »
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derottone

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Reply #21 on: December 06, 2020, 01:25:37 pm
Kind of poor SoBs, working 24/7 with output = zero, I guess that must cause a lot of frustration.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2020, 01:27:43 pm by derottone »
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #22 on: December 09, 2020, 06:06:30 pm

2021 Royal Enfield Meteor first look  -  Andy Greaser -   Nov 12, 2020

https://www.revzilla.com/common-tread/royal-enfield-debuts-the-meteor-350#:~:text=Say%20hello%20to%20the%202021,in%20the%20spring%20of%202021.

The Meteor largely replaces the Thunderbird 350, a model not sold in the United States but the best-selling cruiser in India for the last 20 years, according to Royal Enfield head Siddhartha Lal.

The new standards killed off Royal Enfield's iconic Bullet mill, ending an era for the storied Enfield thumper and prompting the creation of a new model to carry the brand's single-cylinder legacy forward. Say hello to the 2021 Meteor 350. Royal Enfield has confirmed the Meteor is coming to North America in the spring of 2021.

The Meteor largely replaces the Thunderbird 350, a model not sold in the United States but the best-selling cruiser in India for the last 20 years, according to Royal Enfield head Siddhartha Lal.
“The Thunderbird was crucial to our ambition to evolve from a one-model manufacturer and to change the perception of our brand with the emerging demographic exemplified by the upwardly mobile IT professional in Bangalore,” writes Lal. “We used our new lean-burn engine with an all new five-speed gearbox, and for the first time [in 2002], moved the gear shifting on an Enfield to the left side of the motorcycle (gasp!).”

The Meteor will be RE’s first bike on the new, double-cradle “J” platform, and its three variants (Fireball, Stellar and Supernova) are mostly cosmetic variations. "Sure-footed handling and luxurious comfort are aided by 41 mm forks with 130 mm of travel and twin tube emulsion shock absorbers with six-step adjustable preload at the rear," says RE. Controls are the farthest forward of any RE model. The overall appearance suggests a Bullet/Thunderbird crossed with an older Japanese cruiserette, with a pinch of recent Triumph. RE’s styling has become increasingly slick in recent years. Did you know they hired Ducati's Pierre Terblanche to pen the Himalayan?

In addition to mandatory ABS, this simple motorcycle has one tech piece that comes standard: Royal Enfield’s new Tripper navigation system, a small pod in the instrument cluster that shows turn-by-turn navigation. Riders set trip parameters with RE’s app via Bluetooth. The miniature TFT display dedicates most of its screen to arrows that change color and flash as the next turn approaches. It reminds me of Beeline’s smart nav unit that took Kickstarter by storm a few years back.

Tripper marks RE’s first foray into inexpensive nav systems, an especially desirable feature for technophile Indian customers, and I have to think we’ll see the Google-powered Tripper units on other RE models soon. It wouldn’t be too hard to spin off as a universal accessory, either. The USB port on the side of the pod allows the riders to charge a phone and other gadgets. (Hey, motorcycle industry! If Royal Enfield can include a USB port from the factory, you can, too.) One last tech nicety isn't on the bike, but online: a collection of free, high-quality YouTube videos covering all basic maintenance for this model.

“It was a tough and heart-wrenching decision to let go of the Thunderbird brand for all of us at Royal Enfield," writes Lal. "However, in order to once again redefine the cruiser market in India, and to take our unique Royal Enfield style of cruising to the world, we are rekindling a brand that is instantly recognizable as an ‘RE’, as well as a single brand that we can use around the world."
Price will be one of the Meteor’s main strengths, as it retails for around $2,400 in India. Royal Enfield hasn't officially told us the U.S. price yet, but some back-of-the-napkin math puts that number closer to $4,200 for the U.S. market, using the Himalayan’s prices for comparison. The Meteor could be a compelling option for riders seeking classic style, turn-by-turn navigation, simple mechanicals, and beginner-friendly power for under $5,000. A meatier Meteor based on their INT 650 twin would probably do even better.





 
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


20MarkIII

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Reply #23 on: December 10, 2020, 01:16:24 am
Well it seems the Meteor is officially released in the UK. Andy 'Missenden Flyer' made the announcement today on his YT channel. Price: 3749 (I think) British pounds. Funny, he likes the yellow Fireball best too. RE has offered him the opportunity to test ride when stock is sufficient.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #24 on: December 10, 2020, 02:00:31 am
3750 BPS x 1.3 = $4875 USD

I'm hoping the $4200 USD or less is the number over here. $4900 would be very close to the Himalayan price. If you're intent is to get hardware out the door...

Any idea what the Honda H'ness and Jawa Perak are going for? Those look like real competition.


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20MarkIII

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Reply #25 on: December 10, 2020, 02:41:47 am
I could be wrong AzCal but don't think the H'ness or Jawa are available here in the US. Also, it seems I remember some British reviewers of the Interceptor quoting 5600 pounds there while our prices here were $5799 USD. And of course about half of that in India. I still think if RE wants to actually SELL Meteors here they will need to undercut the Rebel 300 price substantially. Time will tell. I recently saw an ad on CL for an '08 S40 with 7700 miles listed for $1650.00. A few others for $2000-$2200. If you want a thumper maybe get one that will at least do highway speed. The Meteor is just so darned good looking! :)


AzCal Retred

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Reply #26 on: December 10, 2020, 04:32:19 am
You were saying the Meteor in the UK was released at about 3750 Pounds/4880 USD. I was interested to see how it compared to the other new "classics" over there, the H'ness & Perak.

UK interceptors at 5600 GBP is about $7300 USD. You were saying our Interceptors were about $5800.
5800/7300 = 80% of the UK price.
$4880 x 0.8 = $3900 USD

So with luck, the Meteor should be a $3900 - $4300 machine Stateside.

The 300 Rebel runs about $4500, Kawasaki Z400 is around $4900, the XV250 is about $4500. If RE can keep the Meteor close to $4000 they should fly off the shelves IMHO.

Your point about the bargain that used bikes present is valid for folks willing to turn a wrench & educate themselves about the hardware. New bike buyers often want that hands-off guaranteed appliance-like reliability. I think RE will need a $300-$500 cushion to lure the mechanically declined over to the non-Japanese "darkside".

A good Suzuki 650 V-Strom or nice TDM850 for about $2500 - $3500 is more up my alley... ;D
« Last Edit: December 10, 2020, 04:52:01 am by AzCal Retred »
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


20MarkIII

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Reply #27 on: December 10, 2020, 10:39:22 am
You were saying the Meteor in the UK was released at about 3750 Pounds/4880 USD. I was interested to see how it compared to the other new "classics" over there, the H'ness & Perak.

UK interceptors at 5600 GBP is about $7300 USD. You were saying our Interceptors were about $5800.
5800/7300 = 80% of the UK price.
$4880 x 0.8 = $3900 USD

So with luck, the Meteor should be a $3900 - $4300 machine Stateside.

The 300 Rebel runs about $4500, Kawasaki Z400 is around $4900, the XV250 is about $4500. If RE can keep the Meteor close to $4000 they should fly off the shelves IMHO.

Your point about the bargain that used bikes present is valid for folks willing to turn a wrench & educate themselves about the hardware. New bike buyers often want that hands-off guaranteed appliance-like reliability. I think RE will need a $300-$500 cushion to lure the mechanically declined over to the non-Japanese "darkside".

A good Suzuki 650 V-Strom or nice TDM850 for about $2500 - $3500 is more up my alley... ;D
Ahh, I got ya. Don't have any idea what the H'ness and Parek sell for in the UK. I agree with you on your other points completely. I will add that I always advise a potential new rider to buy used or NOS from a dealer because they may not like motorcycling once they try it. Also, I think new riders benefit from starting with a smallish bike. The Interceptor has such a smooth clutch and is so well balanced it IMO is a great starter bike that is also very capable at highway speeds. I'm a bit disappointed that the Meteor doesn't have an assist and slipper clutch. The H'Ness does.


Richard230

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Reply #28 on: December 10, 2020, 02:37:50 pm
The problem that I have with U.S. motorcycle prices (at least around here) is that dealers add various unexpected fees to the MSRP. In the SF Bay Area those fees will be between $300 and $1000, apparently depending upon what the dealer believes what the popularity of the model is, will be, or should be.  ::)  And then there is the dreaded "destination" (shipping) and "set-up" charges, as well as various and random state and local taxes and fees. Buying a motorcycle is starting to feel like flying on a commercial airliner - before the demand went off a cliff.

When I bought my KTM 390 Duke, the MSRP was a reasonable $5,400. But then the dealer added a $500 set-up charge and an $800 shipping fee (apparently shipping from India is a lot more expensive than shipping from Japan  ::) )  And there there was the electronic-filing (paperless) DMV fee, state and local taxes, state vehicle license registration fee and probably some sort of environmental-protection fee, all added to the base price of the vehicle. By the time I got out of the shop, my little $5,400 Duke ended up costing me $7,800!

So I wonder what people will actually be paying for the Meteor, at least in California, by the time they manage to push it out of the dealer's door? Especially, if there is an obvious demand (supported by actual cash deposits) for the Meteor.
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #29 on: December 10, 2020, 05:06:03 pm
Re: 20MarkIII @ # 27:
Sounds like we're on the same wavelength.
I believe it's important for a "learner" to have a small bike as it gives them greater control over the machine. Picking it up after a drop is an important skill in it's own right, Braking & shifting coordination are tough enough to learn for most folks without balancing 400+ pounds of hardware as well. A powerful machine can get a new rider into trouble, as it can shove them into situations beyond what their existing skill levels can resolve. I think the old Honda Twinstar is a great training platform. It zips around city streets well enough, virtually everyone can keep it upright at a stop sign, and it's fully capable of day-long backroad meanders, enough to whet the appetite of new riders to keep on with the hobby. As far as freeway, new riders don't need to be mixing it up at 75 anyway, save that for a nice 500/650. You can learn everything you need to know at 15 - 35 MPH. The rest is acquired through more practice & gradual acclimation to greater speed.
Good to hear from you! - ACR -
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


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Reply #30 on: December 10, 2020, 05:14:19 pm
Re: Richard230 @ # 28:
What's the KTM 390 Duke all about? What's it like to live with?
They look like a very nice lightweight weekend sport bike - are they more? Can you take 2-4 day jaunts?
I've seen several in the $2800 - $3500 range used - do they hold up or are they fragile? Is the engine "done" at 30,000?
I've not had a chance to ride one yet, but they do look fun! - ACR -
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


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Reply #31 on: December 10, 2020, 10:20:28 pm
Re: Richard230 @ # 28:
What's the KTM 390 Duke all about? What's it like to live with?
They look like a very nice lightweight weekend sport bike - are they more? Can you take 2-4 day jaunts?
I've seen several in the $2800 - $3500 range used - do they hold up or are they fragile? Is the engine "done" at 30,000?
I've not had a chance to ride one yet, but they do look fun! - ACR -

I only have about 1300 miles on my Duke so far. It runs fine under a load and will hit 100mph. It easily cruises at 80. But the engine is kind of "frantic" and is not much fun around town as it really doesn't like to operate at slow speeds and low throttle openings. The bike is more of a toy than something that is practical for everyday usage. Engine maintenance is pretty involved with something like three different oil filters and drain plugs. The 600-mile servicing required major work, including a full valve lash inspection, a coolant change and a firmware update, along with all of the other stuff you would expect from an initial service. The cost of that service was $650, which was a real surprise to me as I had expected just a oil and filter change and a chassis inspection. That level of major service is scheduled every 9.3K miles. However, the bike does get good fuel mileage. I average about 65mpg, using premium fuel.  Frankly, if I was buying a bike to use every day and one that didn't require much servicing, within that price and performance range, I would have bought one of the Kawasaki 400 models.  As far as the Duke's engine life, I have no idea. I doubt I will keep it long enough to wear out the engine, though.  ;)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


20MarkIII

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Reply #32 on: December 13, 2020, 05:49:26 pm
Re: 20MarkIII @ # 27:
Sounds like we're on the same wavelength.
I believe it's important for a "learner" to have a small bike as it gives them greater control over the machine. Picking it up after a drop is an important skill in it's own right, Braking & shifting coordination are tough enough to learn for most folks without balancing 400+ pounds of hardware as well. A powerful machine can get a new rider into trouble, as it can shove them into situations beyond what their existing skill levels can resolve. I think the old Honda Twinstar is a great training platform. It zips around city streets well enough, virtually everyone can keep it upright at a stop sign, and it's fully capable of day-long backroad meanders, enough to whet the appetite of new riders to keep on with the hobby. As far as freeway, new riders don't need to be mixing it up at 75 anyway, save that for a nice 500/650. You can learn everything you need to know at 15 - 35 MPH. The rest is acquired through more practice & gradual acclimation to greater speed.
Good to hear from you! - ACR -
Funny you mention the Twinstar. Just saw one of those listed on CL as well. Super low miles and around $1600.00. Nice thing about Honda is that parts are usually available for older bikes. I'd kind of forgotten what a neat smaller bike the Twinstars are and an ideal platform for the new rider. I wish RE all the best on their new Meteor. I will make it a point to check them out when available here.


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Reply #33 on: December 15, 2020, 02:54:42 am
No matter how good the Meteor is or isn't is almost beside the point in the US, especially if their aim is to engage new riders. The larger issue, especially in this case is that there just aren't enough dealers and customer service seems to be spotty. I live in Connecticut, an affluent state with strong motorcycle sales. In the entire state there are only two RE dealers, and one is only open three days a week for about 6 hours a day. The other shop is on the North East border on the CT-Mass line about as far from the wealthier part of the state as you can get. The nearest out of state dealers are in NYC and Albany respectively, which puts them out of reach of most CT residents. Meanwhile Honda dealers are just about everywhere, as are most of the metric brands and they all advertise heavily so any prospective newbie is more likely to head to one of them.

Unless the RE dealer network expands, at least in Connecticut, the brand is going to remain somewhat of a "cult" bike, no matter how good they are. And that's especially true if RENA allows dealers to be open part time, and doesn't take customer service as seriously as many of the other manufacturers. FWIW I spent 30 years in the motorcycle business, ten of them as a dealer principle in a multiline shop that sold Suzuki, Yamaha, BMW, Moto Guzzi and Ducati, so I do have some understanding of how a motorcycle business should be run. I guess I should also mention that I do own two RE's, a Himalayan and an Interceptor.


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Reply #34 on: December 15, 2020, 02:52:26 pm
No matter how good the Meteor is or isn't is almost beside the point in the US, especially if their aim is to engage new riders. The larger issue, especially in this case is that there just aren't enough dealers and customer service seems to be spotty. I live in Connecticut, an affluent state with strong motorcycle sales. In the entire state there are only two RE dealers, and one is only open three days a week for about 6 hours a day. The other shop is on the North East border on the CT-Mass line about as far from the wealthier part of the state as you can get. The nearest out of state dealers are in NYC and Albany respectively, which puts them out of reach of most CT residents. Meanwhile Honda dealers are just about everywhere, as are most of the metric brands and they all advertise heavily so any prospective newbie is more likely to head to one of them.

Unless the RE dealer network expands, at least in Connecticut, the brand is going to remain somewhat of a "cult" bike, no matter how good they are. And that's especially true if RENA allows dealers to be open part time, and doesn't take customer service as seriously as many of the other manufacturers. FWIW I spent 30 years in the motorcycle business, ten of them as a dealer principle in a multiline shop that sold Suzuki, Yamaha, BMW, Moto Guzzi and Ducati, so I do have some understanding of how a motorcycle business should be run. I guess I should also mention that I do own two RE's, a Himalayan and an Interceptor.

The other problem that I see is that the few dealers in California that I know of are multi-brand shops and are more likely to steer customers to their other more established brands that perhaps generate more profit from them then to the RE models.
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


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Reply #35 on: December 15, 2020, 04:35:08 pm
The other problem that I see is that the few dealers in California that I know of are multi-brand shops and are more likely to steer customers to their other more established brands that perhaps generate more profit from them then to the RE models.

Agreed, especially the shops that carry a Japan Inc. line. I worked for a shop that carried Royal Enfield in the late 60's it was the same then. The salesmen would show the guy a new Interceptor, then sell him a Norton. It's real shame, they make a great all around motorcycle, If I was younger I wouldn't think twice about opening an RE shop, of course if I was younger I'd be broke...


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Reply #36 on: January 05, 2021, 11:19:05 pm
Royal Enfield to Bring Meteor 350 Cruiser to US in 2021

https://www.cycleworld.com/story/bikes/2021-royal-enfield-meteor-350-first-look/

Royal Enfield has been making headway in the US market lately, so it’s great to see it continue to expand its product lineup. The Meteor 350′s closest competition is the Honda Rebel 300, which retails at $4,599, so we’d imagine the Royal Enfield will come in significantly below that. Expect it to land in US dealerships in the spring of 2021.


xxxxxxx
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Reply #37 on: January 21, 2021, 12:09:15 pm
So I took the click bait from a Chicago RE dealer and inquired about price on the Meteor. No announced USA price yet but they are "happy" to take deposits on the bikes which may be available sometime in February ::). I do want to see one in the flesh. Just not in Chicago...


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Reply #38 on: January 21, 2021, 06:31:14 pm
Chicago? March? No problem. Put 2 of these bad boys in your pockets and all's well.

https://www.amazon.com/Peacock-Japanese-Platinum-Catalyst-Warmer/dp/B009T0QDF8

I've heard using a few 3/8" hex-head sheet metal screws in your tire tread works to alleviate skidding as well...  ;D

Personally, 55 degrees F ( 13 C for the rest of humanity ) is my lower limit!  - ACR -
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


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Reply #39 on: January 21, 2021, 11:01:33 pm

I've heard using a few 3/8" hex-head sheet metal screws in your tire tread works to alleviate skidding as well...  ;D

Kold cutters work way better and don't round off so quickly ;)


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Reply #40 on: January 22, 2021, 12:26:33 am
You are DOUBLE-TUFF my friend!!   :)

Doesn't look like nearly enough clothes. But, that's the great Alaskan dilemma - 4" of snowsuit and 2" of .......!   ;D ;D ;D
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


20MarkIII

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Reply #41 on: January 22, 2021, 02:47:06 am
Chicago? March? No problem. Put 2 of these bad boys in your pockets and all's well.

https://www.amazon.com/Peacock-Japanese-Platinum-Catalyst-Warmer/dp/B009T0QDF8

I've heard using a few 3/8" hex-head sheet metal screws in your tire tread works to alleviate skidding as well...  ;D

Personally, 55 degrees F ( 13 C for the rest of humanity ) is my lower limit!  - ACR -
OMGoodness, haven't seen those in years! I had one for deer hunting I think was the Jon E brand. They can get REALLY hot but uncomfortably so in like one spot. Plus they stink. Whitetails have very keen olfactory sense. The thin shakeup type Hot Hands are much more manageable. I spoke with my Indy Dealer right before Christmas and he plans on ordering a few Meteors for short leg riders who are uncomfortable sitting on the RE twins. I was just trying to get the US price to report here. So far no joy.


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Reply #42 on: January 22, 2021, 03:04:56 am
You are DOUBLE-TUFF my friend!!   :)

Doesn't look like nearly enough clothes. But, that's the great Alaskan dilemma - 4" of snowsuit and 2" of .......!   ;D ;D ;D

As far as riding goes there's not much else we can do here in the winter. ;)


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Reply #43 on: January 22, 2021, 02:02:10 pm
OMGoodness, haven't seen those in years! I had one for deer hunting I think was the Jon E brand. They can get REALLY hot but uncomfortably so in like one spot. Plus they stink. Whitetails have very keen olfactory sense. The thin shakeup type Hot Hands are much more manageable. I spoke with my Indy Dealer right before Christmas and he plans on ordering a few Meteors for short leg riders who are uncomfortable sitting on the RE twins. I was just trying to get the US price to report here. So far no joy.

I figure that the Meteor's price in the U.S. will be whatever the dealers believe the market will bear.  ::)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


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Reply #44 on: January 22, 2021, 08:12:19 pm
I figure that the Meteor's price in the U.S. will be whatever the dealers believe the market will bear.  ::)

To me the larger issue is whether RENA will force the dealer network to step up and actively market the bike and the RE brand, or whether they'll just let it languish. In my town the RE dealer is open three days a week for 6 hours a day. The Honda shop is open six days a week, 9 hours a day. Where do you think a newbie will find it easier to buy a bike? Let alone get better aftersales support.


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Reply #45 on: January 24, 2021, 12:21:05 am
My dealer also mentioned a dealer's meeting he attended a month or so before Christmas and though he couldn't give a price, he does expect the Meteor to list within $500.00 of the Twins. I blurted out "then they won't sell any." He didn't disagree. It will be very interesting to see the climax to this minor drama.


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Reply #46 on: January 24, 2021, 01:32:52 am
My dealer also mentioned a dealer's meeting he attended a month or so before Christmas and though he couldn't give a price, he does expect the Meteor to list within $500.00 of the Twins. I blurted out "then they won't sell any." He didn't disagree. It will be very interesting to see the climax to this minor drama.

Sounds about right to me.  ::) RE loves to squeeze their U.S. customers for everything they are worth.   ;)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


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Reply #47 on: January 24, 2021, 02:42:50 am
With RE still being very much an unknown brand in the USA, I don't see much that will convince Americans to buy one, if RE doesn't price aggressively.

Let's look at the short list of machines in the same general size / power range as the RE Meteor:

Honda Rebel 300           ~27 hp   $4600
Honda CB 300R             ~31 hp   $4950
Kawasaki Versys-X 300   40 hp    $5500
Kawasaki Z 400              44 hp    $5000
RE Himalayan  (411 cc)   24 hp    $4750     
Yamaha Star 250           21 hp     $4350
Yamaha MT-03 (321cc)   ~37 hp  $4600

I believe that Suzuki has discontinued the GW 250, the TU250, and the Van Van 200 in the USA, otherwise I'd list those.  I didn't list any off road bikes, other than the Himalayan,  I didn't list more obscure brands like Cleveland Motowerks or Janus.

What would prompt a buyer to select the Meteor over one of the bikes on the list?  It's hard to imagine reliability being their primary motivation, hard to beat Honda and Yamaha's reputation there.  It wouldn't be because they want more horsepower.  Styling?  Perhaps, but I'm skeptical that young people would prefer what I'd call "early 70's UJM styling" over the more modern styling of many other bikes on the list, or the classic styling that they might get with a Vespa.  Price could sell bikes to beginners, provided they were aware that model existed.

Perhaps if RE offered Meteors to the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, for use in their training courses, at a very attractive price, ... the equivalent of the price they charge in India or less, they could create a US market for themselves, and simultaneously create tremendous brand awareness in this country?   The Meteor's 30" seat height isn't the best for a beginner machine that needs to be ridden by everyone, those old, homely, but reliable Honda 250 Rebels had seats that were under 27" from the pavement.

Aside from a stunt like getting them in the MSF courses, or getting Greta Thunberg to give up her sailboat for a Meteor, I don't anticipate much sales of the Meteor in the USA, even if they do price them aggressively.  The USA just isn't a "practical, economical transportation" kind of market.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2021, 02:44:56 am by axman88 »


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Reply #48 on: January 24, 2021, 02:39:31 pm
With RE still being very much an unknown brand in the USA, I don't see much that will convince Americans to buy one, if RE doesn't price aggressively.

Let's look at the short list of machines in the same general size / power range as the RE Meteor:

Honda Rebel 300           ~27 hp   $4600
Honda CB 300R             ~31 hp   $4950
Kawasaki Versys-X 300   40 hp    $5500
Kawasaki Z 400              44 hp    $5000
RE Himalayan  (411 cc)   24 hp    $4750     
Yamaha Star 250           21 hp     $4350
Yamaha MT-03 (321cc)   ~37 hp  $4600

I believe that Suzuki has discontinued the GW 250, the TU250, and the Van Van 200 in the USA, otherwise I'd list those.  I didn't list any off road bikes, other than the Himalayan,  I didn't list more obscure brands like Cleveland Motowerks or Janus.

What would prompt a buyer to select the Meteor over one of the bikes on the list?  It's hard to imagine reliability being their primary motivation, hard to beat Honda and Yamaha's reputation there.  It wouldn't be because they want more horsepower.  Styling?  Perhaps, but I'm skeptical that young people would prefer what I'd call "early 70's UJM styling" over the more modern styling of many other bikes on the list, or the classic styling that they might get with a Vespa.  Price could sell bikes to beginners, provided they were aware that model existed.

Perhaps if RE offered Meteors to the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, for use in their training courses, at a very attractive price, ... the equivalent of the price they charge in India or less, they could create a US market for themselves, and simultaneously create tremendous brand awareness in this country?   The Meteor's 30" seat height isn't the best for a beginner machine that needs to be ridden by everyone, those old, homely, but reliable Honda 250 Rebels had seats that were under 27" from the pavement.

Aside from a stunt like getting them in the MSF courses, or getting Greta Thunberg to give up her sailboat for a Meteor, I don't anticipate much sales of the Meteor in the USA, even if they do price them aggressively.  The USA just isn't a "practical, economical transportation" kind of market.

You forgot to mention the two 44 hp Kawasaki 400 models that go for between $4,700 and $5,500, depending upon the model and the dealership. Last year I saw a brand new all-white Kawasaki 400 Ninja (without ABS) at the local dealer who was asking only $4,200 for the bike. Also the KTM 390 Duke has an MSRP of $5,500 - at least until you start adding shipping and setup fees to the price.
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


axman88

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Reply #49 on: January 25, 2021, 12:42:28 am
You forgot to mention the two 44 hp Kawasaki 400 models that go for between $4,700 and $5,500, depending upon the model and the dealership. Last year I saw a brand new all-white Kawasaki 400 Ninja (without ABS) at the local dealer who was asking only $4,200 for the bike. Also the KTM 390 Duke has an MSRP of $5,500 - at least until you start adding shipping and setup fees to the price.

Actually, if you meant the Kawa Z-400, it is on my list.  If you meant the Ninja, I left it off, and any other "sport" types, feeling that these were less likely to be considered by anyone considering purchasing a new Meteor.  The Ninja has substantially the same specs and price as the Z-400.

All the prices I listed are MSRP, wherever those could be found.  Of course one can usually purchase at a better price than MSRP, based on many factors, including the time of the month and who in the dealership one talks to.  One Utube video I watched suggested talking to the owner's wife, but this seems counter-intuitive to me.

Those rules of thumb about actual vs MSR pricing seem to not apply to Royal Enfield dealers in the USA.  Even before the pandemic reduced supply side to nil, the expectation of good deals from RE dealers seemed unfulfilled.  I don't have a lot of experience with operating or purchasing from dealers, but it seems to me that there are a couple of factors that might be at play here.
    -  Supply of stock from India tends to be very slow.  Dealerships might be hesitant to sell a machine knowing they may not get a replacement until riding season is halfway over.
    -  Dealers are carry multiple brands.  Our local dealer carries Piaggio, Triumph, BMW and Zero, in addition to RE.  It's a safe bet that any one of those other machines carries a higher profit than the RE.  The urge to upsell to a Triumph is great, and the desire to cut price on a RE is small.  If the RE's just sit there, they can just order fewer, and keep the ones they have for that buyer who insists on an RE but will pay full price.  There are even stories of salesman denigrating the REs, in order to upsell.  Scandalous!
   -  The cost of offering a 3 year warranty is considerably more in the USA than in India.  Mechanic Labor rates and overhead are probably at least an order of magnitude greater.  I suspect that a good proportion of the cost of warranty service is going to fall on the dealership, making them less willing to cut the price of an already low margin product.

The KTM should be on the list of competitives. 
KTM Duke 390  (373 cc)    ~43hp   $5500         

The one drawback I see to the KTM, as a beginner's bike is that the 32.5" seat height might make some new riders uncomfortable.  It also can wheelie.  How is the US dealer network, compared to RE?


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Reply #50 on: January 25, 2021, 01:38:50 am
I bought my KTM 390 Duke from a dealer who also sells RE. Last year they had about a dozen or more KTM bikes and three RE models. Two Interceptors and one olive drab Classic 500. The 500 had been in their showroom for months at the time. They were definitely not giving potential customers any breaks on the price of all three bikes. They were all selling for well over MSRP by the time you added up shipping and setup fees.
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #51 on: January 25, 2021, 04:31:57 am
( I put a request in for the "out-the-door" price - ACR -)

2021 ROYAL ENFIELD METEOR 350

(312) 738-4269

Motorworks Chicago

1901 S WESTERN AVE, CHICAGO, IL 60608

https://www.motoworkschicago.com/--xInventoryDetail?id=9719972

https://www.cycletrader.com/listing/2021-Royal-Enfield-Meteor-350-5014672174
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


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Reply #52 on: January 25, 2021, 01:54:04 pm
Sounds to me like the price of the Meteor is "whatever the market will bear". Contact them about its price and they will check your zip code and credit score to determine what price you will pay.   ::)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


AzCal Retred

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Reply #53 on: January 25, 2021, 06:20:32 pm
In the words of Don McLean - "The more you pay, the more it's worth"! How else can you be the first kid on the block to bask in the glory & adulation?  :o ;D
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


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Reply #54 on: January 26, 2021, 05:19:11 am
( I put a request in for the "out-the-door" price - ACR -)

2021 ROYAL ENFIELD METEOR 350

(312) 738-4269

Motorworks Chicago

1901 S WESTERN AVE, CHICAGO, IL 60608

https://www.motoworkschicago.com/--xInventoryDetail?id=9719972

https://www.cycletrader.com/listing/2021-Royal-Enfield-Meteor-350-5014672174
Same place I checked AC. At least perhaps we will get an email when US pricing is made public.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #55 on: January 26, 2021, 05:40:53 pm
This was the response regarding a request for the 350 Meteor out-the-door price:

Just sendings you a quick email in response to your interest on our Meteor 350's. I do want to give you the good news that we do have a couple of allocations available still. Let me know if you would like to leave a deposit to reserve your allocation today! We did get informed that they could be here anywhere from 4-8 weeks.
 Let me know if there are any other questions that I might be able to assist with. You can also reach me at 312-738-4269 if you want to leave a deposit on a Meteor. Thank you and hope to hear from you soon.


Looks more like an attempt to stimulate anxiety around the ability to purchase rather than an answer to my question. That seems to indicate the loftier $5K price may be the goal here. If so, that should stimulate Interceptor & Himalayan sales even further. The Meteor needs to be a $3500 - $4000 machine to survive on its own merits.
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Reply #56 on: January 26, 2021, 10:17:14 pm
@ 20MarkIII: Latest reply from Motorworks  -
" Well, not only do we not have your registration information, which without that I can not give an out the door since I don't know taxes but Royal Enfield have not released the actual price for the bike. "
What a nice way to leave your dealerships twisting in the wind. Maybe R.E  thinks price depends on customer attitude?   :o
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


axman88

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Reply #57 on: January 27, 2021, 05:13:59 am
Motoworks is the local, multibrand dealer that I mentioned in my previous post.  It's a cool place, lots of goodies can be found there.

But, they are, perhaps, not known for the most straightforward pricing quotes.  Have a glance at this thread:

https://forum.classicmotorworks.com/index.php?topic=27599.msg315920#msg315920

I have a bit of compassion in my heart for dealers of motorcycles ( and snowmobiles) in the Chicago area.  Riding season is short, ( less than 6 months for many riders), but rent and utilities go on all year long.

We've seen with stories about searching for a Classic 500 that lots of dealers with online presence seem to be quite happy to leave offers to sell online for bikes that were sold weeks and months ago.  In some cases, the dealership staff doesn't seem to realize these machines are not available until the eager buyer sets foot in their store.

I wouldn't be surprised if some dealers are happy to offer machines for sale that they don't yet have.  It seems pretty unreasonable to expect buyers to cough up cash in exchange for promises when a price hasn't even been agreed on, but I guess it is one way of measuring the market desirability of a new offering.  By that reasoning, even asking for quotes at this point, showing ANY interest, only makes the price higher when it is eventually announced.

If you want this bike to be cheap in the US, don't play along with these games.  Of course, if nobody shows interest, RE will change their mind about offering it in the US, a decision that seems obvious to me.  It seems like they are having a difficult time competing with their own, UCE 350s, in their domestic market, which is borne out by the numbers here:

https://forum.classicmotorworks.com/index.php?topic=29646.msg353371#msg353371


zimmemr

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Reply #58 on: February 01, 2021, 05:24:10 pm
@ 20MarkIII: Latest reply from Motorworks  -
" Well, not only do we not have your registration information, which without that I can not give an out the door since I don't know taxes but Royal Enfield have not released the actual price for the bike. "
What a nice way to leave your dealerships twisting in the wind. Maybe R.E  thinks price depends on customer attitude?   :o

My thinking (shallow as it might be) is that RE is erring on the side of caution here. As we all know 350 singles have never been wildly popular in the US, at least not in pure road bike configuration, and the days of dealers selling a dozen 350 twins on a Saturday ended with the demise of the original CB350 and their marketing people are very aware of that.

There's not much markup in a 350 either so dealers aren't going to be wild about stocking them unless they know they can sell a few of them, And they also want some assurances that the bikes are going to be stone ax reliable and easy to service so they can position them as an entry level/non enthusiast sale, and not get stuck with a bunch of unsold bikes if the thing tanks.

In any event I agree that they're probably trying to gauge the market, which is tough under the best of conditions and I'd think damn near impossible the way things are right now.

Personally I'd like to see them bring in maybe a thousand of them, sell them at rock bottom prices, and see if it jumps starts the market for a simple, reliable bike that appeals to practical riders like most of us here and at the same time entices new riders. If so maybe history will repeat itself ala Honda. How many of us know guys that started on Honda 50's and ended up with a 'Wing?

Maybe RE could even offer a trade in incentive like HD did. Buy a 350, ride it for a year or two, and trade it in, with a pre determined value on an Interceptor when the time is right. I really my Himalayan and my Interceptor and have been thinking about adding a Classic as an around the block type of bike if I could find one, but would certainly consider a 350 if and when they become available.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #59 on: February 02, 2021, 12:47:09 am
Wise words from the trenches! Royal Enfield USA, are you listening? Are you willing to listen to a little real world experience?  ???
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


Nitrowing

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Reply #60 on: February 02, 2021, 02:18:45 am
. Buy a 350, ride it for a year or two, and trade it in, with a pre determined value on an Interceptor when the time is right..
That's a good strategy as it would also increase the availability of 2nd hand bikes for tightwads like me!
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Morgan60

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Reply #61 on: February 02, 2021, 09:32:19 am
I think the Meteor 350 is going to be a tuff sell here in the US. 350cc is just to small of bike to be successful in my opinion. As much as I love REs I have no plans on buying one. But if they pump it up to 500cc I would consider it, plastic fenders and all. Just my $.02 cents.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2021, 09:35:16 am by Morgan60 »
REs I currently own:
2007 AVL Bullet Electra Gray
2010 Bullet G5 Deluxe Black
2017 535 GT Continental Red
2018 Himalayan White
2018 Pegasus Green
2019 650 Continental GT Ice Queen or white
2020 Trials 500 Green and Chrome


AzCal Retred

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Reply #62 on: February 02, 2021, 09:28:20 pm
It would be interesting to know if Hitchcocks already has an Indian Meteor "Test Mule" and are working on the big bore kit... 8)
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


Morgan60

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Reply #63 on: February 03, 2021, 07:27:12 am
It would be interesting to know if Hitchcocks already has an Indian Meteor "Test Mule" and are working on the big bore kit... 8)

I wouldn’t be surprised if Hitchcocks had a big bore kit out soon for the 350 Meteor. But the only way I’d buy the Meteor is if it came from RE as a 500. Until then l’m keeping a eye out for the new twin cruiser and the KX 838.
 https://bikesquadron.com/royal-enfield-bobber-838/
REs I currently own:
2007 AVL Bullet Electra Gray
2010 Bullet G5 Deluxe Black
2017 535 GT Continental Red
2018 Himalayan White
2018 Pegasus Green
2019 650 Continental GT Ice Queen or white
2020 Trials 500 Green and Chrome


AzCal Retred

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Reply #64 on: February 03, 2021, 09:00:21 am
I've seen the trade show models, but is there an actual operational, running KX838? Have you run across any road test or track shots? It looks pretty cool, but wouldn't something like a 1,000cc Interceptor parallel twin be easier to produce & market?
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Nitrowing

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Reply #65 on: February 03, 2021, 10:18:33 am
838 looks really nice  8)
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axman88

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Reply #66 on: February 04, 2021, 06:43:08 am
I've seen the trade show models, but is there an actual operational, running KX838? Have you run across any road test or track shots? It looks pretty cool, but wouldn't something like a 1,000cc Interceptor parallel twin be easier to produce & market?
The KX838 cruiser that they were showing at EICMA was just a mock up with many components including the engine block, carved out of model maker's foam.  I've read that the engine was built with help from Polaris, perhaps they supplied the cylinders and heads?  RE had a velvet rope around it at the show, so nobody could get close enough to gouge a chunk out of the engine case with their fingernail.  To me, the girder fork looked pretty sketchy, it didn't appear to have any moving elements, as constructed for the mockup.  But the display did it's job and drew MUCHO attention.  There were even articles published in the India moto press, predicting sale price and release date.  Sidhartha Lal said it was just for show, there was no plan at the time to take it into production.  I have seen no sign since, that an operating prototype or anything other than the show dummy was built, no video of engine running, no recordings of engine sound, no still shots of a development bike wearing breakup camo.

You can see the foam parts before they are sprayed in this video:  https://youtu.be/em01i-NlP94?t=54

Plans for the KX838 are discussed in this article, from 12/18, including a link to the interview with Sid Lal:  https://www.cartoq.com/waiting-for-the-royal-enfield-bobber-dont/


Nitrowing

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Reply #67 on: February 04, 2021, 09:41:16 am
Would it be so difficult for a company to make a crank&case to accept a pair of their own cylinders?
700cc, 838cc, 1000cc, 1070cc
No wonder we no longer have a motor industry


Paul W

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Reply #68 on: February 04, 2021, 10:35:05 am
The largest market for RE, by a large margin, is in their home country and the 350 has always been very popular there. If they invested in a far larger engine size it would probably only sell in small numbers in India.

Seems to me that they are taking things very sensibly and gradually improving their reputation across the rest of the world. Let's face it - until very recently RE was seen as an enigma, a "dinosaur" brand, almost a joke outside of India. However, by sensible management they are emerging as a world brand, offering good, middle range bikes at a sensible price. Hopefully in time they will be able to expand further and be able to sell bigger bikes which appeal to those wanting more power, which probably still won't be their home market.

They have undoubtedly taken trade from Triumph, which I'm not alone as seeing as very much overpriced now. I can see them also producing something like a reasonably priced version of a modern Norton sporting twin, possibly an 850, which I think would sell very well. How about Royal Enfield "Commander" as a name.....?  ;)
« Last Edit: February 04, 2021, 10:37:22 am by Paul W »
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Morgan60

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Reply #69 on: February 04, 2021, 11:26:40 am
As far as I know at this point the KX 838 was a concept show bike.  But I believe it was 2018 Dallas TX motorcycle show where I saw the new Himalayan. Also the 650 GT and the Intercepter was also there as a none running bike up on a platform so no one could not set on it.  It maybe two four years but I’d be surprised if RE didn’t have some version of the KX 838 out in production. This bike is just to sexy not have to sell. I know the motor was a joint venture between RE and Polaris some time back, so they have a good start there.  I very much love the looks of this motor with the built in oil reserve right up front. The hole bike really is a work of art. I do know the final production model maybe deferent but I have to own it if and when it’s available.
REs I currently own:
2007 AVL Bullet Electra Gray
2010 Bullet G5 Deluxe Black
2017 535 GT Continental Red
2018 Himalayan White
2018 Pegasus Green
2019 650 Continental GT Ice Queen or white
2020 Trials 500 Green and Chrome


Morgan60

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Reply #70 on: February 04, 2021, 11:39:54 am
I can see them also producing something like a reasonably priced version of a modern Norton sporting twin, possibly an 850, which I think would sell very well. How about Royal Enfield "Commander" as a name.....?  ;)

The model name Commander has all ready been take buy Norton.

The Commander was a Norton motorcycle with a Wankel rotary engine.

The first Norton Wankel motorcycle was the 1987 Classic using an air-cooled engine, built as a special edition of just 100 machines. It was followed by the air-cooled Interpol 2 model.

The Commander was a liquid-cooled successor to the Interpol 2, liquid cooling being adopted for greater power and reliability. The Commander's final-drive chain was protected by a full enclosure. Some cycle parts (such as wheels, forks, switchgear, clocks & brakes) were bought-in Yamaha items from the XJ900.

Two types of Commander were built. The P52 was a single-seat model equipped for police use. The second was the dual-seat P53 civilian tourer. Both the P52 and P53 had panniers integral with their fibreglass bodywork.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2021, 11:46:07 am by Morgan60 »
REs I currently own:
2007 AVL Bullet Electra Gray
2010 Bullet G5 Deluxe Black
2017 535 GT Continental Red
2018 Himalayan White
2018 Pegasus Green
2019 650 Continental GT Ice Queen or white
2020 Trials 500 Green and Chrome


Richard230

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Reply #71 on: February 04, 2021, 02:01:36 pm
I wonder what it is like to find engine parts for the Norton Commander rotary nowadays?   ;)   Are there any still running?  ???
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Paul W

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Reply #72 on: February 04, 2021, 08:47:03 pm
I should have remembered that, bearing in mind that my work place is less than two miles away from the most recent Norton factory!  ;)
« Last Edit: February 04, 2021, 08:51:25 pm by Paul W »
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ace.cafe

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Reply #73 on: February 07, 2021, 03:26:23 pm
Would it be so difficult for a company to make a crank&case to accept a pair of their own cylinders?
700cc, 838cc, 1000cc, 1070cc
Carberry did it with the Double Barrel, Aniket Vardhan did it with the Musket, Norcroft did it.
It seems to be beyond the technical abilities of the Royal Enfield company, sadly.
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Karl Fenn

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Reply #74 on: February 23, 2021, 07:22:20 pm
Well l suppose the moral of the story is don't compare a little bike with a small one, your expectations will be dissapointing.


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Reply #75 on: April 15, 2021, 06:38:10 pm
I think there will be a market for this bike in the US.  Everyone who wants to play it safe and just get out there without going 100 mph; and thats plenty of people.   Great starter bike for a woman and there are more female riders than ever these days.

My local dealer has some in; can't wait to sit on one when i take my INT650 in for it's 500 mile tune up!
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Richard230

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Reply #76 on: April 15, 2021, 10:09:11 pm
I think there will be a market for this bike in the US.  Everyone who wants to play it safe and just get out there without going 100 mph; and thats plenty of people.   Great starter bike for a woman and there are more female riders than ever these days.

My local dealer has some in; can't wait to sit on one when i take my INT650 in for it's 500 mile tune up!

The relatively new motorcycles that I see in the San Francisco Bay Area all seem to follow the same pattern: BMWs, KTM's an Ducatis. The more expensive the model the more popular they are. I hardly see anything under 800cc around here.  ???
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Rick Dangerous

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Reply #77 on: April 15, 2021, 11:49:27 pm
"San Francisco Bay Area".....one of the very wealthiest areas in the country.
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Richard230

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Reply #78 on: April 16, 2021, 01:04:51 am
"San Francisco Bay Area".....one of the very wealthiest areas in the country.

That is very true. And many of the young men who live in the area like to flaunt their wealth by buying expensive vehicles.
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1