Author Topic: Upcoming RE Meteor 350 looks interesting!  (Read 2956 times)

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Richard230

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Reply #15 on: September 12, 2020, 11:12:15 pm
I think you can get away with low hp in the U.S. market, but you would have to make it up with high torque. Just ask H-D.  ;)
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #16 on: September 19, 2020, 04:25:48 am
The Meteor looks like it's powered by the 78mm x 86mm Himalayan motor with a smaller piston, shoehorned into a street frame, right? If it is the Himalayan motor, the 460 Hitchcocks go-fast stuff should bolt on. - ACR -
A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


Boxerman

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Reply #17 on: September 19, 2020, 08:20:49 am
Have you seen the new Benelli Imperiale? It's a blatent Bullet rip-off as regards styling and virtually identical performance - and it produces only 21 BHP from a new design 400cc twin spark 4 valve head engine. It's effectively an even cheaper Bullet made in China.
It's styling is not a rip-off of the Bullet, it's styled around the old twostroke Jawas, it is also supposed to sound like a twostroke to appeal to Jawa fans too, but whether it does or not - I don't know, but I can definitely see the old Jawa styling.

The Benelli isn't a copy of the Bullet either, it's spelled Bullit for one thing and the styling / engine is totally different.

Frank



Keef Sparrow

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Reply #18 on: September 19, 2020, 12:57:46 pm
It's styling is not a rip-off of the Bullet, it's styled around the old twostroke Jawas, it is also supposed to sound like a twostroke to appeal to Jawa fans too, but whether it does or not - I don't know, but I can definitely see the old Jawa styling.

The Benelli isn't a copy of the Bullet either, it's spelled Bullit for one thing and the styling / engine is totally different.

Frank
I wasn't meaning it was a direct copy of the Bullet meant to look exactly the same, more that it was more than slightly influenced by the Bullet and aimed very directly at the Bullet market. Look at the silencer, split seat, rear mudguard/subframe assembly, steel mudguards, sprung seat, side panels, upright engine - even the swing arm pivot cover. And you are seriously telling me all those things weren't 'borrowed' from the Bullet?
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Richard230

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Reply #19 on: September 19, 2020, 03:05:27 pm
Well, it could use a couple of "cats eyes".   ;)
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Boxerman

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Reply #20 on: September 19, 2020, 04:28:52 pm
My apologies, I was thinking of the new Jawa - don't know why? praps I'm going / gone senile?  :-[ :-[ :-[

Frannk


Keef Sparrow

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Reply #21 on: September 20, 2020, 01:34:41 am
My apologies, I was thinking of the new Jawa - don't know why? praps I'm going / gone senile?  :-[ :-[ :-[
No problem! I remember the old Jawa 350 2 stroke twins. It's bizarre that that are now making Jawa's in India - with a 4 stroke engine that is designed to look like a 2 stroke.  :o What a strange world we live in these days. :-\
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muezler

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axman88

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Reply #23 on: November 10, 2020, 07:14:27 pm
There's been an underwhelming response in this forum to the new Meteor 350, although certainly it's caused some talk in India.

Although it may never be exported to North America, it seems that RE does intend to export to Europe:
https://www.webbikeworld.com/royal-enfields-meteor-350-will-be-in-europe-soon/

I suspect we will also see it being assembled at RE Thailand eventually, and possibly at RE Argentina as well.

It seems likely that the OHC "J" engine will supplant the pushrod UCEs in development of new models.  Will we see a "big bore" J?  This source has the 349cc Meteor engine at 72 mm x 85.8 mm bore x stroke.
  https://www.financialexpress.com/auto/bike-news/royal-enfield-meteor-350-vs-thunderbird-350-engine-power-styling-features-tripper-cb350/2124164/
This would mean a 499cc "J" on the same crank would have a bore right around 86mm.

Will we be seeing a new Forum category for the OHC "J" engines?   


Keef Sparrow

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Reply #24 on: November 10, 2020, 08:01:00 pm
There's been an underwhelming response in this forum to the new Meteor 350, although certainly it's caused some talk in India.
I suspect people in the UK are somewhat underwhelmed about the likely performance of a 350 single on the open road - 500 Bullets aren't exactly fast...
Quote
It seems likely that the OHC "J" engine will supplant the pushrod UCEs in development of new models.  Will we see a "big bore" J?  This source has the 349cc Meteor engine at 72 mm x 85.8 mm bore x stroke.
  https://www.financialexpress.com/auto/bike-news/royal-enfield-meteor-350-vs-thunderbird-350-engine-power-styling-features-tripper-cb350/2124164/
This would mean a 499cc "J" on the same crank would have a bore right around 86mm.
Finally an oversquare single from Royal Enfield that might equal the performance of Japanese 500 singles?
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axman88

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Reply #25 on: November 11, 2020, 06:55:56 am
I suspect people in the UK are somewhat underwhelmed about the likely performance of a 350 single on the open road -
That would seem inconsistent with the fact that machines of 125cc or less have reliably comprised around 30% of registered motorcycles in the UK over the last decade.  Considering all 500cc and lower machines, the number is  more like 45%, although steadily trending down.
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/veh03

These new 350s would seem to quite outclass the popular Vespas and similar, performance wise, and be able to undercut them in price at the same time.   Interesting how closely India pricing lines up with what Honda announced for their new H'Ness.

The Meteor's seat height appears to be substantially lower than that of the Bullet, making these new machines more attractive to new riders.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #26 on: November 11, 2020, 08:19:15 am
Shouldn't be too hard to get 25-28 BHP out of a new clean-sheet design 21 cubic inch motor. Japanese machines have been making 1.5 BHP per cubic inch for a long time. A lighter, lower machine with the same BHP as a 500 Bullet should be quite fun. Most Japanese 250's I have been on do OK at 60-70 MPH, can't see why a current design spec 350 wouldn't do as well. My money is on Axman88's guess, that the 500 motor will basically be a punched out 350; that's what they've done before, right?
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Richard230

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Reply #27 on: November 11, 2020, 02:42:23 pm
Reports about the Meteor say that it makes a claimed 20 hp (no doubt at the crankshaft) and has a top speed of about 70 mph. It is supposed to be a little less spirited than the Himalayan engine. RE is still trying to retain the "thump" that many of their Indian customers demand, which means that high revs are not the engine's forte. But perhaps the real question in overseas markets is what will it cost outside India? I don't know about the UK or EU markets, but in the U.S. I bet it would sell for a price similar to that of the Himalayan and not all that much less than the 650. And you know what the result of that sort of pricing would be.  ::)
« Last Edit: November 11, 2020, 03:37:55 pm by Richard230 »
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AzCal Retred

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Reply #28 on: November 11, 2020, 10:27:36 pm
Looks to me like a cam & headwork would perk it up, maybe a different piston to up CR from 9.5/1 to maybe 11/1. Factory tuning seems to be all about the fuel efficiency, with a claimed 95-100 MPG. Nice close, plentiful cylinder & head finning, so shedding a bit more heat shouldn't be a problem. The counterbalanced engine smooths out the road vibration, the trans seems to be well spaced. A nice effort it seems to me. If an owner wanted to make it a bit faster/stronger, it shouldn't be too difficult or pricey.

One thing I see on all these new bike road tests is the blathering on about the onboard electronics. I'm not seeing the value to these. A bike is "in the wind" transportation you are supposed to learn to use. If I wanted a cocoon of electro-wizardry I'd just get a car. Even magic ABS won't help if you find an oil slick/wet leaves/black ice in a corner or when suddenly braking. Get a cage if you don't want to be exposed to road hazards, or just learn how to ride the bike & pay attention to road conditions. The electronic speedo makes some sense, as you eliminate a spinning wire filled cable, but the plethora of other electro-improvements are mainly just features to drive up the price. But that's just me.

Anyhow - the Meteor looks like a good piece to me. Over here it'll likely be egotistically relegated to "starter bike" status, but in it's homeland they'll likely see real service. - ACR -

A brace of 1999 Bullets: 1 Red Deluxe, 1 Green Standard. Also, 1 wee orphan 1956 Fire Arrow project.


wr6133

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Reply #29 on: November 12, 2020, 06:58:19 am
That would seem inconsistent with the fact that machines of 125cc or less have reliably comprised around 30% of registered motorcycles in the UK over the last decade.  Considering all 500cc and lower machines, the number is  more like 45%, although steadily trending down.
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/veh03

125cc or below with a maximum of 14.7BHP can be ridden by anyone 17 or older (16 if it's a 50cc that only does 28mph) after completing a cheap (£100-ish) 1 day basic training (CBT) and displaying L plates. This means 125's sell lots to youngsters or people looking for a cheap to run vehicle to commute on. In comparison to get a proper licence they would be looking at spending close to £1000 and depending on age may have to do it multiple times, as they age, to finally get a ride whatever you like licence.

The above means the Meteor will make no impact on the 125 sales in the UK. I struggle to see it doing well here unless it's so cheap commuters view it as almost disposable, it's in a deadzone for licencing. The earlier mentioned L platers can't ride it, the A1 licence can't use it, the A2 licence (for 19 years olds), it has less than half the permitted power output and what teenager wants that? Then the A licence for big boys (24+) I suspect if after an RE would just buy a twin or if after a cruiser would go for something more, cruisery.