Author Topic: Stock Interceptor vs my free-breathing Interceptor  (Read 5391 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Heavy Duty Mick

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: 1
on: August 05, 2020, 11:31:33 am
For those who have been waiting for facts and figures without the bullshit. Here is a stock 650 Interceptor and my 650 Interceptor that is fitted with S&S Cycle, Inc. mufflers, pipes from Royal Enfield Sydney / Revelry Cycles, DNA High Performance Filters air filter, and tuned with a PowerTRONIC - Plug-In Performance ECU.

The blue lines are the stock bike. The red lines are my bike.

The tuning was performed by Dave and Vince at Sydney Dyno Pty Ltd

Don't just look at the peak horsepower numbers, look at the improvement in torque and horsepower everywhere. This is a difference that you will definitely notice. It's not a race bike but it is a bucket of fun to ride. Especially with the quickshifter.

Thank you to Will and Santina at Royal Enfield Sydney


ace.cafe

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 14,298
  • Karma: 0
  • World leaders in performance/racing Bullets
Reply #1 on: August 05, 2020, 12:11:16 pm
Solid gains.
Home of the Fireball 535 !


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #2 on: August 05, 2020, 12:28:37 pm
interesting figure.

So 3HP gain at WOT with pipes, exhaust, air filter, remap.

How much did all that cost ? I guesstimate around the 1800 USD mark ?



Roshiba777

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 370
  • Karma: 0
Reply #3 on: August 05, 2020, 12:49:34 pm
According to powerdynamics their piggy back ecu alone can increase the bhp +3bhp on stock setup with map 2
Royal Enfield CI 500 (2000)
Royal Enfield STD UCE 500 (2010)
Royal Enfield Classic 500 (2011)
Royal Enfield Classic Chrome 500 (2011)
Yamaha RD350 (1988)
Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 (2019)


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #4 on: August 05, 2020, 01:09:45 pm
For those who have been waiting for facts and figures without the bullshit. Here is a stock 650 Interceptor and my 650 Interceptor that is fitted with S&S Cycle, Inc. mufflers, pipes from Royal Enfield Sydney / Revelry Cycles, DNA High Performance Filters air filter, and tuned with a PowerTRONIC - Plug-In Performance ECU.

The blue lines are the stock bike. The red lines are my bike.

The tuning was performed by Dave and Vince at Sydney Dyno Pty Ltd

Don't just look at the peak horsepower numbers, look at the improvement in torque and horsepower everywhere.
This is a difference that you will definitely notice. It's not a race bike but it is a bucket of fun to ride. Especially with the quickshifter.

Thank you to Will and Santina at Royal Enfield Sydney
Thanks HD MIck for doing this and publishing it.
I know that some folks will dismiss "up-tuning" a midsize motorcycle when you could just buy a faster 1150cc something. Then they dismiss the bigger bike because nobody uses all that power ... etc. blah de blah.
That is missing the point entirely. A point that you make and I agree with. Sweet running motorcycles -especially midsize ones - are a real joy to ride. My bike has gone from a really great bike to a _ I love this freak'n motorcycle!
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


Heavy Duty Mick

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: 1
Reply #5 on: August 05, 2020, 01:17:45 pm
Something to think about.

Where does your tacho needle spend most of the time while you are riding?

That’s the area to look at on the graph I shared.

The greatest gains are right there where you do most of your riding.


goody59

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 84
  • Karma: 0
Reply #6 on: August 05, 2020, 01:22:58 pm
Thanks Mick. Great job sharing. Makes a great Interceptor even greater.
Steve from Victoria, Australia. 2020 Interceptor.


Heavy Duty Mick

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: 1
Reply #7 on: August 05, 2020, 01:23:17 pm
According to powerdynamics their piggy back ecu alone can increase the bhp +3bhp on stock setup with map 2

I can’t make any comment on that as I fitted the Powertronics unit after de-restricting the intake and exhaust.

Will from Royal Enfield Sydney loaded maps in that he had prepared earlier. They worked well and provided an excellent baseline for Dave and Vince to tune from.


Jako

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: 0
Reply #8 on: August 05, 2020, 01:28:49 pm
Thanks for sharing these results,  I'm  impressed  how the gains are spread throughout the range. Big improvment at 5500 rpm  , my fun zone 5-6 k
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 01:35:38 pm by Jako »
2020 Rav Red Interceptor (wife's bike) ,Interceptor 2019 bakers express


Jako

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: 0
Reply #9 on: August 05, 2020, 01:51:30 pm
Heavy Duty Mick
  Do you have the dyno chart showing  Wills supplied map V  the dyno tuned map ?
2020 Rav Red Interceptor (wife's bike) ,Interceptor 2019 bakers express


twocoolgliders

  • Cookie
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,565
  • Karma: 1
Reply #10 on: August 05, 2020, 02:01:26 pm
With great power, comes great responsibility.

Use it for good, not evil!

Cookie




For those who have been waiting for facts and figures without the bullshit. Here is a stock 650 Interceptor and my 650 Interceptor that is fitted with S&S Cycle, Inc. mufflers, pipes from Royal Enfield Sydney / Revelry Cycles, DNA High Performance Filters air filter, and tuned with a PowerTRONIC - Plug-In Performance ECU.

The blue lines are the stock bike. The red lines are my bike.

The tuning was performed by Dave and Vince at Sydney Dyno Pty Ltd

Don't just look at the peak horsepower numbers, look at the improvement in torque and horsepower everywhere. This is a difference that you will definitely notice. It's not a race bike but it is a bucket of fun to ride. Especially with the quickshifter.

Thank you to Will and Santina at Royal Enfield Sydney


twocoolgliders

  • Cookie
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,565
  • Karma: 1
Reply #11 on: August 05, 2020, 02:02:57 pm
cyril,

You are one of the few who live in the world or "reality"....

Just sayin'


Cookie




interesting figure.

So 3HP gain at WOT with pipes, exhaust, air filter, remap.

How much did all that cost ? I guesstimate around the 1800 USD mark ?


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #12 on: August 05, 2020, 02:28:28 pm
I tend to be a pragmatic. I bought a 6500€, 47HP bike. Because i liked its overall look, feel and engine. It just happened to be a royal enfield.

For the money of getting that same bike up to 50HP (and getting it not street legal in the process), i would buy a triumph street twin in a heartbeat. It has more displacement, a 65HP engine, better suspensions, better finish.

Do not get me wrong, I like my interceptor, and it is totally worth its cost. I just find hard to justify spending that kind of money on an engine to get so little in return.

I have nothing against people doing it anyway. Not everyone cares about the money side when passions shows its head. I am doing the same with my race car (although with VERY different result. OEM power: 171HP. current: 600ish. And it revs higher than my int. Turbos are great  8)) And just like it, it IS a serious money pit !




Silver650INT

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 18
  • Karma: 0
Reply #13 on: August 05, 2020, 02:57:11 pm
It was interesting for me to see what the stock curves were like. The HP and torque really follow each other in a linear fashion unlike most charts I have seen on other engines before. The first time I tried to run it to redline I hit a very "hard" rev limiter before the redline began which mirrors what the dyno chart shows. I guess that is the same for all of these bikes with stock electronics. I don't know if it is an ignition cutout or a fuel injection shut down, but it is very abrupt. My last bike was a 1988 CBR250R with 18k redline and was an audio concert of large proportions.


Breezin

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 359
  • Karma: 0
  • Ireland; 2019 Interceptor
Reply #14 on: August 05, 2020, 03:30:28 pm
I tend to be a pragmatic. I bought a 6500€, 47HP bike. Because i liked its overall look, feel and engine. It just happened to be a royal enfield.

For the money of getting that same bike up to 50HP (and getting it not street legal in the process), i would buy a triumph street twin in a heartbeat. It has more displacement, a 65HP engine, better suspensions, better finish.

Do not get me wrong, I like my interceptor, and it is totally worth its cost. I just find hard to justify spending that kind of money on an engine to get so little in return.

I have nothing against people doing it anyway. Not everyone cares about the money side when passions shows its head. I am doing the same with my race car (although with VERY different result. OEM power: 171HP. current: 600ish. And it revs higher than my int. Turbos are great  8)) And just like it, it IS a serious money pit !

Great to have an informed, sceptical voice on the forum. Really rare and valuable knowledge.

I probably would be more attached to RE (and not sure about the recent gearbox stories around Triumphs) and I tend to be happy enough with whatever compromise that brings. I agree that chasing performance on this unit is more about fun than practicality, but to each his or her own.


mwmosser

  • Illegitimi non carborundum
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 945
  • Karma: 2
  • Austin, TX, USA
Reply #15 on: August 05, 2020, 04:58:17 pm
I do like how this topic gets at the meta-level "head vs heart" discussions that are really at the center of all these mod posts. I also bought the RE as much for a low-cost fun bike to ride on weekends as anything, and while I've made a few minor mods to things like mirrors and an LED H4 bulb (not yet a full drop-in LED headlight, though that may be in future), I haven't done anything engine-wise and don't plan to. Like Cyril, I'm not keen on putting $1500+ into a $6500 bike for gains that I don't really need. Want? Sure. But the bike is pretty good as is and I'm happy with it. Plus I have a kid headed to uni soon and $1500 might buy a textbook or two  ;D
2019 RE INT 650 Mark Three


Breezin

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 359
  • Karma: 0
  • Ireland; 2019 Interceptor
Reply #16 on: August 05, 2020, 05:07:26 pm
$1500 might buy a textbook or two  ;D

Yes, but will it make any difference to performance?  :o  ;D


GlennF

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,470
  • Karma: 0
Reply #17 on: August 05, 2020, 05:21:05 pm
I tend to be a pragmatic. I bought a 6500€, 47HP bike. Because i liked its overall look, feel and engine. It just happened to be a royal enfield.

For the money of getting that same bike up to 50HP (and getting it not street legal in the process), i would buy a triumph street twin in a heartbeat. It has more displacement, a 65HP engine, better suspensions, better finish.

Do not get me wrong, I like my interceptor, and it is totally worth its cost. I just find hard to justify spending that kind of money on an engine to get so little in return.

I have nothing against people doing it anyway. Not everyone cares about the money side when passions shows its head. I am doing the same with my race car (although with VERY different result. OEM power: 171HP. current: 600ish. And it revs higher than my int. Turbos are great  8)) And just like it, it IS a serious money pit !

Yep ... I am happy enough with my B5 for now but may eventually upgrade (though to be honest I do not ride the B5 enough to justify its annual registration and insurance neverlone upgrading to a newer bike) and if I do trade up it will probably be either a stock 47HP  Interceptor or a stock 52 HP Guzzi V7 . 


jimku

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 770
  • Karma: 0
  • Nampa, Idaho USA
Reply #18 on: August 05, 2020, 07:38:25 pm
If you remove all of the Powertronics stuff and replace it with a Booster Plug, there might be something here that is meaningful to most of us who are not going to spend the bucks for a Powertronics or dyno tuning.
2019 Interceptor. 
I hope my tubeless wheels make you cringe. 8) https://www.dropbox.com/s/zobmpjq2gqtvypj/RE%20TIRE%20AND%20WHEEL.JPG?dl=0
Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug.
https://youtu.be/GG5ghP8XLW8


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #19 on: August 05, 2020, 08:18:47 pm
If you remove all of the Powertronics stuff and replace it with a Booster Plug, there might be something here that is meaningful to most of us who are not going to spend the bucks for a Powertronics or dyno tuning.
As I have said before, I don't have a dyno (bummer). But I've been around them and I'm willing to stick my neck out with a observation.
When you look at both bikes results, Red HD Mick's and blue the stocker, you will notice that the lines are pretty much parallel. Just that HD Mick's are better across the board. You will also notice that the blue OEM line gets wiggly near the top of the rev range. I think that is where the stock system struggles for air.
That tells me that both the factory team and Mick's guys know exactly how to map a fuel injection system. It must have killed the factory guys to choke down that engine in order to meet the licensing and insurance standards.
I also think that if you added a green line representing the BoosterPlug with the other upgrades it would cling to the underside of the red line. That is based on a wild guess and 40+ years of experience. ;)
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


mwmosser

  • Illegitimi non carborundum
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 945
  • Karma: 2
  • Austin, TX, USA
Reply #20 on: August 05, 2020, 08:48:17 pm
That tells me that both the factory team and Mick's guys know exactly how to map a fuel injection system. It must have killed the factory guys to choke down that engine in order to meet the licensing and insurance standards.

It's also emission standards. Not going to get into a flamey kind of discussion about all that, but Euro 4 and Euro 5 emission standards are tough for a reason, and they are the global standard (even more than EPA). Yes, bikes are a small percentage of overall vehicles on the road. Yes, diesel trucks and lawnmowers and any big ICE is going to be emitting more than any of our no-longer-compliant bike with a cat delete and re-tune.

Yes, bikers are notoriously independent and crotchety and hate to be told what to do  8).

All that does not change the fact that manufacturers are making bikes to meet emissions requirements. We're free to modify as we wish. But engineers have to design to standards that allow bikes to be sold.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2020, 08:56:25 pm by mwmosser »
2019 RE INT 650 Mark Three


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #21 on: August 05, 2020, 09:22:37 pm
It's also emission standards. Not going to get into a flamey kind of discussion about all that, but Euro 4 and Euro 5 emission standards are tough for a reason, and they are the global standard (even more than EPA). Yes, bikes are a small percentage of overall vehicles on the road. Yes, diesel trucks and lawnmowers and any big ICE is going to be emitting more than any of our no-longer-compliant bike with a cat delete and re-tune.

Yes, bikers are notoriously independent and crotchety and hate to be told what to do  8).

All that does not change the fact that manufacturers are making bikes to meet emissions requirements. We're free to modify as we wish. But engineers have to design to standards that allow bikes to be sold.

I'm pretty sure that it was not a coincidence that RE hit exactly the HP number for the "junior" license barrier and in turn a demarcation line for insurance rates. All the global market bike do have emission standards, you are right about that. But bikes can meet those standards at 104hp on up. The global operators limitations were based on displacement not long ago and still is in some countries. But then the midsize bike got faster and faster.

So you are certainly not wrong. However, I'm pretty sure that the horsepower was on the cover sheet of their business plan for this model.  ;)
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


mwmosser

  • Illegitimi non carborundum
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 945
  • Karma: 2
  • Austin, TX, USA
Reply #22 on: August 05, 2020, 10:09:33 pm
I'm pretty sure that it was not a coincidence that RE hit exactly the HP number for the "junior" license barrier and in turn a demarcation line for insurance rates. All the global market bike do have emission standards, you are right about that. But bikes can meet those standards at 104hp on up. The global operators limitations were based on displacement not long ago and still is in some countries. But then the midsize bike got faster and faster.

So you are certainly not wrong. However, I'm pretty sure that the horsepower was on the cover sheet of their business plan for this model.  ;)

Great points. Totally agree with the A2 and other graduated license standards driving this as well. TBH, I wish we had those here in the US as well. But that's a thread for another day....
2019 RE INT 650 Mark Three


08crd

  • Neophyte
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • Karma: 0
Reply #23 on: August 06, 2020, 07:32:36 am
We all go through it, when I was a young bloke I bought an XS2 650 Yamaha, bored it stuck in 650 Benelli pistons and still got my ar$e kicked by a Honda 4.
Now I've gone full circle, up to 2.3 rocket and now back to a 650 Interceptor and loving it.


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #24 on: August 06, 2020, 08:24:08 am
For those who have been waiting for facts and figures without the bullshit. Here is a stock 650 Interceptor and my 650 Interceptor that is fitted with S&S Cycle, Inc. mufflers, pipes from Royal Enfield Sydney / Revelry Cycles, DNA High Performance Filters air filter, and tuned with a PowerTRONIC - Plug-In Performance ECU.

The blue lines are the stock bike. The red lines are my bike.

The tuning was performed by Dave and Vince at Sydney Dyno Pty Ltd

Don't just look at the peak horsepower numbers, look at the improvement in torque and horsepower everywhere. This is a difference that you will definitely notice. It's not a race bike but it is a bucket of fun to ride. Especially with the quickshifter.

Thank you to Will and Santina at Royal Enfield Sydney
That’s something like a mean 10% difference. Good on you mate, those graphs are hard to argue with. Although I bet Cyril will!
Thanks, Steve
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #25 on: August 06, 2020, 08:29:05 am
Thanks HD MIck for doing this and publishing it.
I know that some folks will dismiss "up-tuning" a midsize motorcycle when you could just buy a faster 1150cc something. Then they dismiss the bigger bike because nobody uses all that power ... etc. blah de blah.
That is missing the point entirely. A point that you make and I agree with. Sweet running motorcycles -especially midsize ones - are a real joy to ride. My bike has gone from a really great bike to a _ I love this freak'n motorcycle!
Well put and my opinion entirely 👍
Steve
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #26 on: August 06, 2020, 10:15:28 am
As I have said before, I don't have a dyno (bummer). But I've been around them and I'm willing to stick my neck out with a observation.
When you look at both bikes results, Red HD Mick's and blue the stocker, you will notice that the lines are pretty much parallel. Just that HD Mick's are better across the board. You will also notice that the blue OEM line gets wiggly near the top of the rev range. I think that is where the stock system struggles for air.
That tells me that both the factory team and Mick's guys know exactly how to map a fuel injection system. It must have killed the factory guys to choke down that engine in order to meet the licensing and insurance standards.
I also think that if you added a green line representing the BoosterPlug with the other upgrades it would cling to the underside of the red line. That is based on a wild guess and 40+ years of experience. ;)
Rational contributions as usual👍
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #27 on: August 06, 2020, 10:20:49 am
I'm pretty sure that it was not a coincidence that RE hit exactly the HP number for the "junior" license barrier and in turn a demarcation line for insurance rates. All the global market bike do have emission standards, you are right about that. But bikes can meet those standards at 104hp on up. The global operators limitations were based on displacement not long ago and still is in some countries. But then the midsize bike got faster and faster.

So you are certainly not wrong. However, I'm pretty sure that the horsepower was on the cover sheet of their business plan for this model.  ;)
As I've said elsewhere, when these bikes become popular enough, I'm sure someone will 'crack' the stock ECU and create aftermarket maps which will will significantly improve the performance with few other mods required, other than filters and exhausts. Steve
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


Warwick

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 233
  • Karma: 0
Reply #28 on: August 06, 2020, 11:24:09 am
Thanks for publishing the dyno chart. I look forward to seeing how all modifications impact performance. Keep em coming
cheers and beers
Warwick
2007 Bullet, 1999 Lightning, 1994 Honda CBR1000f, 2010 Honda VFR1200f, 2007 Kawasaki GPX 250, 2019 Interceptor


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #29 on: August 06, 2020, 11:27:55 am
We all go through it, when I was a young bloke I bought an XS2 650 Yamaha, bored it stuck in 650 Benelli pistons and still got my ar$e kicked by a Honda 4.
Now I've gone full circle, up to 2.3 rocket and now back to a 650 Interceptor and loving it.

Did something similar. I was once the owner of a 1200 bandit, that i fitted with a 1100gsxr head and carbs for good measure. The chassis was already not up to the torque the oem engine could bear, so now i could feel it twist proportionnally to the throttle i gave it.
Then the engine was destroyed by the mechanic i paid to set valve clearance, and he happened to have one for sale, only this one had been fitted with 1340cc upgrade. So it went int, for cheap.
Eventually i grew tired of destroying tyres and spending more money on gas than on a car. I also felt like i was going to die on every corner entry, exit and straight line, so sold the engine, got an oem one, sold the bike, and got a twin 650 that i kept for around 10 years.
And then sold that one for the interceptor. Which is a great bike  8)



Heavy Duty Mick

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: 1
Reply #30 on: August 06, 2020, 01:28:27 pm
Lots of differing opinions here.

I don’t care if anyone likes or dislikes what I have done.

This bike makes me smile every time I ride it and that’s all I care about.

If other people choose to use any info that I have shared, that’s another reason to smile.

If people choose to disagree, that’s good too. If we all agreed, it’d be a very boring world.


twocoolgliders

  • Cookie
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,565
  • Karma: 1
Reply #31 on: August 06, 2020, 01:41:59 pm
Yo dude!   You actually "did something.....not just idle talk....you did it!

Cool!

The information is very useful.

Hopefully you are happy with the results and it met your expectations!


Cookie
 


Lots of differing opinions here.

I don’t care if anyone likes or dislikes what I have done.

This bike makes me smile every time I ride it and that’s all I care about.

If other people choose to use any info that I have shared, that’s another reason to smile.

If people choose to disagree, that’s good too. If we all agreed, it’d be a very boring world.


mwmosser

  • Illegitimi non carborundum
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 945
  • Karma: 2
  • Austin, TX, USA
Reply #32 on: August 06, 2020, 01:43:36 pm
For sure. Was just saying in another thread that if you're happy with it, that's all that matters. Thanks for posting your experience and enjoy riding!
2019 RE INT 650 Mark Three


Oldie but Goldie

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 40
  • Karma: 0
Reply #33 on: August 06, 2020, 01:46:52 pm
Thanks for sharing
No matter the bike you ride
Wind is the same for all...


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #34 on: August 06, 2020, 01:48:48 pm
Seems i was not understood.

I find your results interesting, and totally in line with what i would expect from that work. I have nothing against people who mods stuff as long as they make an informed decision, and in this aspect, your post is very welcome as it shows exactly what you get, and the info does not come from someone trying to grab your money.

The message i try to say is "people should do these mods if cost is not an issue, if they are not aiming for more than 3-5hp, and if they do not mind not being road legal".

I would not do it on my bike, mostly for the first 2 reasons to be perfectly honest. But i have absolutely no issue with people who do it anyway.






Dr Mayhem

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
  • Karma: 0
Reply #35 on: August 07, 2020, 04:00:36 am
Think I measured the runner length in the airbox at 9 1/2"with a total of 14" to the valves. Cut that total intake length to 11-12" and you get over 50hp without loosing anything (very little) on the bottom.

That HP curve is 99.8% because of the stock 14" intake length
Guy
19 Conti GT in Dr Mayhem paint 08/24/2019
06 HD Street Bob
04 Buell XB12S Lightning


Dr Mayhem

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
  • Karma: 0
Reply #36 on: August 07, 2020, 03:55:03 pm
As good a explanation of long intake runner vs short as you're ever likely to hear. This is a universal truth among all 4 stroke engines regardless!

Love those TPI 383 strokers. I have one in my old GMC box van  ;D

https://youtu.be/QazvSzZKj24?t=326
Guy
19 Conti GT in Dr Mayhem paint 08/24/2019
06 HD Street Bob
04 Buell XB12S Lightning


dcolak

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 100
  • Karma: 0
Reply #37 on: August 12, 2020, 01:40:36 am
Guys, are you aware that top torque of the original bike is at 5100 RPM?

Modified one gives you that same torque at 3500 RPM!

Modified bike at 6500 RPM still gives the max torque that original bike had at 5100 RPM!

That is simply AWESOME.

It transforms the bike from good to awesome, if you actually like to ride it and are not afraid to use the full RPM range  8)

Ah, and if you ride it like granny, you still get the benefit of having max torque at low 3500 RPM, which actually does not fall off afterwards but keeps rising (unlike the original after 5100 RPM).

P.S.
You do not do this kind of mod to get "3 HP on top."

You do it to get more useful torque all over the RPM range and actually keep the motor more relaxed.


« Last Edit: August 12, 2020, 01:53:21 am by dcolak »
Triumph 800XC, Royal Enfield 650GT


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #38 on: August 12, 2020, 03:22:24 am
Think I measured the runner length in the airbox at 9 1/2"with a total of 14" to the valves. Cut that total intake length to 11-12" and you get over 50hp without loosing anything (very little) on the bottom.

That HP curve is 99.8% because of the stock 14" intake length
Can you suggest any simple reversible way
to shorten the runner?
Steve
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #39 on: August 12, 2020, 05:00:48 am
Can you suggest any simple reversible way
to shorten the runner?
Steve
A rotary saw and JB Weld   8)
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #40 on: August 12, 2020, 10:09:51 am
A rotary saw and JB Weld   8)
Couldn’t just plug it somehow? Does the chamber have to be rigid?
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


Dr Mayhem

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
  • Karma: 0
Reply #41 on: August 12, 2020, 12:26:40 pm
Quote
Posted by: dcolak
« on: Today at 01:40:36 am »

    Insert Quote


Guys, are you aware that top torque of the original bike is at 5100 RPM?

Modified one gives you that same torque at 3500 RPM!

Modified bike at 6500 RPM still gives the max torque that original bike had at 5100 RPM!

That is simply AWESOME.

It transforms the bike from good to awesome, if you actually like to ride it and are not afraid to use the full RPM range  8)

Ah, and if you ride it like granny, you still get the benefit of having max torque at low 3500 RPM, which actually does not fall off afterwards but keeps rising (unlike the original after 5100 RPM).

P.S.
You do not do this kind of mod to get "3 HP on top."

You do it to get more useful torque all over the RPM range and actually keep the motor more relaxed.

YES!.. good advice!!

Quote
Quote from: Starpeve on Today at 03:22:24 am

    Can you suggest any simple reversible way
    to shorten the runner?
    Steve


Component parts all glued together so it would be a little involved

Guy
19 Conti GT in Dr Mayhem paint 08/24/2019
06 HD Street Bob
04 Buell XB12S Lightning


Bilgemaster

  • Just some guy
  • Global Moderator
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,386
  • Karma: 0
  • 2005 Bullet 500ES in "Mean Green" Military Trim
Reply #42 on: August 12, 2020, 01:39:49 pm
Here's another vote of thanks to the pile for 'Heavy Duty Mick' for going to the trouble to document his performance gains so masterfully. In fact, with my newly-acquired magical powers of "Global Moderator" I find that I was able to award him a well-deserved "Karma Point" for his efforts.

I may still be plodding along on an old Iron Belly thumper, but still find your modern 650 shenanigans fascinating. The Interceptor's at the top of a very short list of bikes built since the Reagan Administration that I'd like to own one day. So far I've only ever seen a single one "in the wild", an Orange Crush one that also makes it to those 'Bikes and Breakfast' shindigs in Clifton, VA. The only thing I find uninspiring about it is its overly subdued exhaust note. It's a little TOO restrained and "wheezy". Hard facts aside, the heart can't help wondering how "Heavy Duty Mick's" ride sounds with all those farkles. A little more full-throated, perhaps? I wouldn't want to rattle the neighbor's windows when I set off. Hell, my Bullet's still running stock pipes to keep it kind of subdued when need be. But just a little low-down bark when you give it a twist would be nice.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2020, 01:48:32 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.

(Legal enough to pass muster if they don't look too closely in Woodbridge, Virginia, where the buses don't run at night, holidays or weekends and I'm a contender for 'Village Idiot')


tooseevee

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,706
  • Karma: 0
  • A Simple Twist Of Fate
Reply #43 on: August 12, 2020, 02:32:11 pm
It's also emission standards. Not going to get into a flamey kind of discussion about all that, but Euro 4 and Euro 5 emission standards are tough for a reason, and they are the global standard (even more than EPA). Yes, bikes are a small percentage of overall vehicles on the road. Yes, diesel trucks and lawnmowers and any big ICE is going to be emitting more than any of our no-longer-compliant bike with a cat delete and re-tune.

Yes, bikers are notoriously independent and crotchety and hate to be told what to do  8).

All that does not change the fact that manufacturers are making bikes to meet emissions requirements. We're free to modify as we wish. But engineers have to design to standards that allow bikes to be sold.

           Well said.
'08 Black AVL Classic.ACEhead 9.8:1/manifold/canister. TM32/Open short bottle/hot tube removed. Pertronix Coil. Fed mandates removed. Gr.TCI. Bobber seat. Battery in right side case. Decomp&all doodads removed. '30s Lucas taillight/7" visored headlight. Much blackout & wire/electrical upgrades


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #44 on: August 12, 2020, 02:39:03 pm
Guys, are you aware that top torque of the original bike is at 5100 RPM?

Modified one gives you that same torque at 3500 RPM!

Modified bike at 6500 RPM still gives the max torque that original bike had at 5100 RPM!

That is simply AWESOME.

It transforms the bike from good to awesome, if you actually like to ride it and are not afraid to use the full RPM range  8)

Ah, and if you ride it like granny, you still get the benefit of having max torque at low 3500 RPM, which actually does not fall off afterwards but keeps rising (unlike the original after 5100 RPM).

P.S.
You do not do this kind of mod to get "3 HP on top."

You do it to get more useful torque all over the RPM range and actually keep the motor more relaxed.

This is a mistake, but do not worry many people do it. A WOT dyno run cannot be used to extrapolate part throttle or transient as you imply on your last sentence. Unless you get more displacement, the additional power at WOT is always the result of lesser power at part throttle.

The engine lost its harmonics scavenging systems both at the intake and exhaust to get more flow when it was limited, i.e. at high throttle opening and WOT. This means the engine will give more torque than stock, but only at that time; and it will give less when these systems were working. There is threshold on the throttle opening where the power is going to be worse than stock. Usually that is under around 60-70% throttle opening.

It means that when you are cruising, or giving a bit of gas, the engine will produce less torque than stock. the upgraded air filter gives better transient, which makes the butt dyno feel that you get more, but you do not. While this is great in racing condition, it also makes keeping the same speed harder; the bike becomes a bit more on/off.  It is similar to how stiffer suspensions can make its user believe he goes faster, as he feels more bumps and Gs. I had quite some passengers in my track car that said it felt slow compared to their car. They were very surprised seeing it was actually running 2 seconds a lap faster than them. Do not be deceived by your feelings !



Breezin

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 359
  • Karma: 0
  • Ireland; 2019 Interceptor
Reply #45 on: August 12, 2020, 06:20:40 pm
'Butt dyno'. Love it!
Thinking of taking a PhD in mechanical engineering... this discussion to be heavily cited!  ;D


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #46 on: August 13, 2020, 03:18:48 am
This is a mistake, but do not worry many people do it. A WOT dyno run cannot be used to extrapolate part throttle or transient as you imply on your last sentence. Unless you get more displacement, the additional power at WOT is always the result of lesser power at part throttle.

The engine lost its harmonics scavenging systems both at the intake and exhaust to get more flow when it was limited, i.e. at high throttle opening and WOT. This means the engine will give more torque than stock, but only at that time; and it will give less when these systems were working. There is threshold on the throttle opening where the power is going to be worse than stock. Usually that is under around 60-70% throttle opening.

It means that when you are cruising, or giving a bit of gas, the engine will produce less torque than stock. the upgraded air filter gives better transient, which makes the butt dyno feel that you get more, but you do not. While this is great in racing condition, it also makes keeping the same speed harder; the bike becomes a bit more on/off.  It is similar to how stiffer suspensions can make its user believe he goes faster, as he feels more bumps and Gs. I had quite some passengers in my track car that said it felt slow compared to their car. They were very surprised seeing it was actually running 2 seconds a lap faster than them. Do not be deceived by your feelings !
Fillings, nothing more than fillings....
Fillings, fillings of lurve....
Sorry, I got the music in me!😁😁👍
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


gizzo

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,370
  • Karma: 0
  • Live slow, die whenever
Reply #47 on: August 13, 2020, 04:02:55 am
This is a mistake, but do not worry many people do it. A WOT dyno run cannot be used to extrapolate part throttle or transient as you imply on your last sentence. Unless you get more displacement, the additional power at WOT is always the result of lesser power at part throttle.

The engine lost its harmonics scavenging systems both at the intake and exhaust to get more flow when it was limited, i.e. at high throttle opening and WOT. This means the engine will give more torque than stock, but only at that time; and it will give less when these systems were working. There is threshold on the throttle opening where the power is going to be worse than stock. Usually that is under around 60-70% throttle opening.

It means that when you are cruising, or giving a bit of gas, the engine will produce less torque than stock. the upgraded air filter gives better transient, which makes the butt dyno feel that you get more, but you do not. While this is great in racing condition, it also makes keeping the same speed harder; the bike becomes a bit more on/off.  It is similar to how stiffer suspensions can make its user believe he goes faster, as he feels more bumps and Gs. I had quite some passengers in my track car that said it felt slow compared to their car. They were very surprised seeing it was actually running 2 seconds a lap faster than them. Do not be deceived by your feelings !

It's OK, he's only going to be operating at the rev limiter in 1st anyway  ;)
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM


GlennF

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,470
  • Karma: 0
Reply #48 on: August 13, 2020, 05:58:11 am
'Butt dyno'. Love it!
Thinking of taking a PhD in mechanical engineering... this discussion to be heavily cited!  ;D

lol ...  be sure to talk lots about Carnot Cycle heat engines and entropy and enthalpy and thermodynamic system equilibrium cycles and reversible adiabatic expansion .. and, you know ...  stuff

... or you could just follow the modern trend of declaring anything hard to understand, especially if it involves math, as a conspiracy and hence obviously bad for you :D


dcolak

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 100
  • Karma: 0
Reply #49 on: August 13, 2020, 09:26:07 pm
This is a mistake, but do not worry many people do it. A WOT dyno run cannot be used to extrapolate part throttle or transient as you imply on your last sentence. Unless you get more displacement, the additional power at WOT is always the result of lesser power at part throttle.

The engine lost its harmonics scavenging systems both at the intake and exhaust to get more flow when it was limited, i.e. at high throttle opening and WOT. This means the engine will give more torque than stock, but only at that time; and it will give less when these systems were working. There is threshold on the throttle opening where the power is going to be worse than stock. Usually that is under around 60-70% throttle opening.

It means that when you are cruising, or giving a bit of gas, the engine will produce less torque than stock. the upgraded air filter gives better transient, which makes the butt dyno feel that you get more, but you do not. While this is great in racing condition, it also makes keeping the same speed harder; the bike becomes a bit more on/off.  It is similar to how stiffer suspensions can make its user believe he goes faster, as he feels more bumps and Gs. I had quite some passengers in my track car that said it felt slow compared to their car. They were very surprised seeing it was actually running 2 seconds a lap faster than them. Do not be deceived by your feelings !

If the fuel mapping is correct you will see better torque at all throttle openings. Why do you think ECU will restrict the fueling because of more air getting into the engine and being easier to get it out of the system through the new exhaust cans? It will compensate no matter what position throttle is in.

« Last Edit: August 13, 2020, 09:29:04 pm by dcolak »
Triumph 800XC, Royal Enfield 650GT


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #50 on: August 14, 2020, 07:46:58 am
If the fuel mapping is correct you will see better torque at all throttle openings. Why do you think ECU will restrict the fueling because of more air getting into the engine and being easier to get it out of the system through the new exhaust cans? It will compensate no matter what position throttle is in.
👍
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #51 on: August 14, 2020, 11:18:09 am
If the fuel mapping is correct you will see better torque at all throttle openings. Why do you think ECU will restrict the fueling because of more air getting into the engine and being easier to get it out of the system through the new exhaust cans? It will compensate no matter what position throttle is in.

No, you will not, as the problem is not fuel but air, and i never said that, thank you.

Like starpeve you believe the ECU does some kind of black magic. It does not, it will send whatever fuel is needed to reach the target AFR, this is not an alphaN system nor a carburetor.

The hard part in an engine that uses injection is getting air in and out. Fuel is not a limiting factor. The problem here is that less air is entering the cylinders for the same throttle position when at part throttle.

By removing the airbox cover, you are discarding the system that helps push air in the cylinders.
By removing the stock silencers and replacing them with a straight through, you are discarding the scavenging system that helps pump burnt gas out of the cylinders and replace it with fresh mixture when valve overlap happens.

Both these effects take place around a specific rpm and its first and second multiple (called second and third harmonics), on a race engine they will be set for high rpms (and you will lose top end power by changing the silencer and/or the airbox on that kind of bike. The only reason to ditch the silencer is weight gain).
On bikes like ours, that were never meant with top end power in mind, they are set to work at lower revs. They can restrict flow, and since they are not set for max power, this is why they get removed. Put  bigger exhaust cans and a bigger airbox, and these systems can be used without restricting the maximum amount of air that can enter the engine... but there is no room for that.

Anyway, removing these systems when they are not tuned for max power and restrict max engine flow allows more maximum flow, which is in effect when the throttle is opened a lot.

You will find countless pages of explanations regarding this on google, search for "airbox tuning" or "airbox resonnance" , and exhaust scavenging effect.



Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #52 on: August 14, 2020, 12:03:52 pm
No, you will not, as the problem is not fuel but air, and i never said that, thank you.

Like starpeve you believe the ECU does some kind of black magic. It does not, it will send whatever fuel is needed to reach the target AFR, this is not an alphaN system nor a carburetor.

The hard part in an engine that uses injection is getting air in and out. Fuel is not a limiting factor. The problem here is that less air is entering the cylinders for the same throttle position when at part throttle.

By removing the airbox cover, you are discarding the system that helps push air in the cylinders.
By removing the stock silencers and replacing them with a straight through, you are discarding the scavenging system that helps pump burnt gas out of the cylinders and replace it with fresh mixture when valve overlap happens.

Both these effects take place around a specific rpm and its first and second multiple (called second and third harmonics), on a race engine they will be set for high rpms (and you will lose top end power by changing the silencer and/or the airbox on that kind of bike. The only reason to ditch the silencer is weight gain).
On bikes like ours, that were never meant with top end power in mind, they are set to work at lower revs. They can restrict flow, and since they are not set for max power, this is why they get removed. Put  bigger exhaust cans and a bigger airbox, and these systems can be used without restricting the maximum amount of air that can enter the engine... but there is no room for that.

Anyway, removing these systems when they are not tuned for max power and restrict max engine flow allows more maximum flow, which is in effect when the throttle is opened a lot.

You will find countless pages of explanations regarding this on google, search for "airbox tuning" or "airbox resonnance" , and exhaust scavenging effect.
And yet you continue to deny or ignore my cpu example of the ls1 V8 example I’ve spoken off.
As I just posted elsewhere, are you aware the the 650’s cpu restricts fuel to the engine when it reads 5500 rpm from the crank angle sensor? Right where the torque drops off? For ‘engine protection’? I’m not talking about black magic, I’m talking about deliberate performance moderation on an engine which could possibly perform much better if allowed. Maybe not. But probably yes.
Steve
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


gizzo

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,370
  • Karma: 0
  • Live slow, die whenever
Reply #53 on: August 14, 2020, 12:30:01 pm
LS1's love a tune because they were tuned so sloppily from new. They run too rich and ignition curves are choppy and all over the place. Who you ask depends on whether it was on purpose or by mistake. Here's a good read. It's old now but LS motors are no spring chickens, either. Note the part where they mention the power gain with a failing fuel pump dropping pressure and leaning the AFR. (Disclaimer: I've never owned an LS, this is just what I've learned from reading and chatting with owners. My own carb fed SBC and I6 motors gained power/economy after cam, head, displacement, exhaust and carb changes).

https://www.oztrack.com.au/2013-09-27-06-14-12/ls1-tuning-explained

I think you're both right. A well tuned from factory engine needs more than a tune to make big power gains. But one hamstrung from the factory, there's room for improvement.
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM


9fingers

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 827
  • Karma: 0
  • From the New Hampshire part of New Jersey
Reply #54 on: August 14, 2020, 01:07:58 pm
What a fantastic torque curve! No wonder that bike is so easy and fun to ride.
9fingers
Currently own:

2016 Classic Chrome Maroon
2020 Moto Guzzi V7III Special
V Strom 650 ABS Adventure
Beta Rev 3 270
Honda TLR200 custom
Honda TL 250 TMI custom frame
Honda TL 125
Yamaha TY350


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #55 on: August 14, 2020, 01:58:39 pm
...
By removing the stock silencers and replacing them with a straight through, you are discarding the scavenging system that helps pump burnt gas out of the cylinders and replace it with fresh mixture when valve overlap happens.
I think you are describing that "back pressure" slows the pace of (lets call them) gulps of exhaust to better match the valve overlap. Is that true?

I noticed right away that the 650s don't use a cross-over pipe or it is so very small I don't see it.
While impractical for the RE, you can have it both. A variable EXUP valve is widely used now a days.
You can see a short but clear explanation here: https://www.yamahapart.com/exhaustultimatepowervalveexup

As a more sane approach, a small (7/8") pitot tube could be run between two replacement silencers. A thousand years ago I worked on a project that converted a Lycoming 036 aircraft engine to run on propane. We found that these small tubes worked better than the original full diameter cross over tubes.

I guess my point is that cyril31 isn't wrong but avoiding the goal of better performance isn't necessarily right and certainly not impossible.
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


Dr Mayhem

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
  • Karma: 0
Reply #56 on: August 14, 2020, 04:16:57 pm
And yet you continue to deny or ignore my cpu example of the ls1 V8 example I’ve spoken off.
As I just posted elsewhere, are you aware the the 650’s cpu restricts fuel to the engine when it reads 5500 rpm from the crank angle sensor? Right where the torque drops off? For ‘engine protection’? I’m not talking about black magic, I’m talking about deliberate performance moderation on an engine which could possibly perform much better if allowed. Maybe not. But probably yes.
Steve

Hmmm?.. and the wizards have no eyes, LoL

I see and easy 58-60 HP from this motor using the stock cams if you have a clue ;D

Guy
19 Conti GT in Dr Mayhem paint 08/24/2019
06 HD Street Bob
04 Buell XB12S Lightning


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #57 on: August 14, 2020, 04:33:31 pm
And yet you continue to deny or ignore my cpu example of the ls1 V8 example I’ve spoken off.
As I just posted elsewhere, are you aware the the 650’s cpu restricts fuel to the engine when it reads 5500 rpm from the crank angle sensor? Right where the torque drops off? For ‘engine protection’? I’m not talking about black magic, I’m talking about deliberate performance moderation on an engine which could possibly perform much better if allowed. Maybe not. But probably yes.
Steve

Yes, i ignore it because that engine has nothing to do with a twin 650cc SOHC bike engine.

No, i am not aware the ECU "restricts fuel", and neither are you. I am aware you claimed that in another thread, without giving any kind of evidence.

I am aware of your mindset, and i know you resent me each time i show your beliefs are either wrong or unproven. You are not the first, nor the last.
I cannot point you the crossroad and the path, but you will have to choose to walk it. But until you change your mindset to something more scientific and reasonable, you will improve your knowledge.

You are convinced the ECU cuts power, and that you will take every bit of information that seems to go toward your conviction as gospel that does not require any kind of proof. You will jump to conclusions in the same way, and you will discard every proof that shows you are wrong because it does not match what you believe. Case in point, you are ignoring the results of the thread owner here.


I am open to discussing your claim, but you have to realize that claiming something out of the ordinary requires solid proof and explanation.
Explain what you mean by "fuel restriction",give proof of its existence, and how this is a cause of limiting power. And then we will discuss. I do have a  pretty good idea of what you observed or were told though, and a very ordinary explanation of it already.

If you can prove your point I will believe you; i have no problem with accepting I am wrong. 

But right now, considering the complete absence of proof and explanation from you and your stance on the subject i hope you understand my doubts are pretty high.


Dr Mayhem

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
  • Karma: 0
Reply #58 on: August 14, 2020, 04:43:53 pm
Yes, i ignore it because that engine has nothing to do with a twin 650cc SOHC bike engine.

No, i am not aware the ECU "restricts fuel", and neither are you. I am aware you claimed that in another thread, without giving any kind of evidence.

I am aware of your mindset, and i know you resent me each time i show your beliefs are either wrong or unproven. You are not the first, nor the last.
I cannot point you the crossroad and the path, but you will have to choose to walk it. But until you change your mindset to something more scientific and reasonable, you will improve your knowledge.

You are convinced the ECU cuts power, and that you will take every bit of information that seems to go toward your conviction as gospel that does not require any kind of proof. You will jump to conclusions in the same way, and you will discard every proof that shows you are wrong because it does not match what you believe. Case in point, you are ignoring the results of the thread owner here.


I am open to discussing your claim, but you have to realize that claiming something out of the ordinary requires solid proof and explanation.
Explain what you mean by "fuel restriction",give proof of its existence, and how this is a cause of limiting power. And then we will discuss. I do have a  pretty good idea of what you observed or were told though, and a very ordinary explanation of it already.

If you can prove your point I will believe you; i have no problem with accepting I am wrong. 

But right now, considering the complete absence of proof and explanation from you and your stance on the subject i hope you understand my doubts are pretty high.

LoL  ;D

Quote
, are you aware the the 650’s cpu restricts fuel to the engine when it reads 5500 rpm from the crank angle sensor?

Lifted directly from the 650 service manual!!

Paranoid much??
Guy
19 Conti GT in Dr Mayhem paint 08/24/2019
06 HD Street Bob
04 Buell XB12S Lightning


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #59 on: August 14, 2020, 06:41:34 pm
Doubting and asking for proof is not paranoia, it is science.

Believing everything you read in a book is exactly what religious guys tell you.

I found the info page 620, 606 in the pdf.

copy / paste.

Quote
16. Crank Position Sensor
It provides an alternating electrical pulse to the ECU, to determine crankshaft speed and TDC position of the piston in
compression stroke. This input will help the ECU to optimize both fuel injection as well as Ignition advance required to
suit the crankshaft rotation speed (RPM).
In the event throttle is wide open, leading to crankshaft speed above 5500 RPM, the high frequency electrical pulses from
the crank position sensor will prompt the ECU to restrict fuel supply so that the crank speed reduces to safe levels. This is
a safety aspect to prevent damage to moving engine parts.

Read the bold part now. Doesn't it strike you as odd that something tells you it not justs restricts fuel, but it prevents the engine from revving doing so ? Because if that was true, the engine would well, not rev higher than 6000. and yet it does.


Which made me think there is an error in that book - and I know there are tons, like that chapter that tells to top up oil level with brake fluid. But since it is an unordinary claim, i searched for proof ...

And I found it, with a google search. That section is a copy/paste of euro4 single cylinders engines from royal enfield.

 pdf page 178, the very same text. Which makes sense, on a single 500cc engine ...

http://www.royalenfieldlesite.fr/spip/IMG/pdf/manuel-entretien-roayl-enfield-500.pdf

There is a slight change though:
Quote
n the event the throttle is held wide open with gears in neutral, leading to crankshaft speed above 5500 RPM, thehigh frequency electrical pulses from the crank position sensor will prompt the ECU to restrict fuel supply so that thecrank speed reduces below 5000 RPM. This is a safety aspect to prevent damage to moving engine parts.

My bet is whoever copied this forgot this part in bold.

« Last Edit: August 14, 2020, 06:45:14 pm by cyril31 »


Dr Mayhem

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
  • Karma: 0
Reply #60 on: August 14, 2020, 06:50:26 pm
Doubting and asking for proof is not paranoia, it is science.

Believing everything you read in a book is exactly what religious guys tell you.

I found the info page 620, 606 in the pdf.

copy / paste.

Read the bold part now. Doesn't it strike you as odd that something tells you it not justs restricts fuel, but it prevents the engine from revving doing so ? Because if that was true, the engine would well, not rev higher than 6000. and yet it does.


Which made me think there is an error in that book - and I know there are tons, like that chapter that tells to top up oil level with brake fluid. But since it is an unordinary claim, i searched for proof ...

And I found it, with a google search. That section is a copy/paste of euro4 single cylinders engines from royal enfield.

 pdf page 178, the very same text. Which makes sense, on a single 500cc engine ...

http://www.royalenfieldlesite.fr/spip/IMG/pdf/manuel-entretien-roayl-enfield-500.pdf

Aren't there forums strictly dedicated to arguing, one upmanship and related obnoxiousness?

Tell me how you would get 58-60 HP from this engine naturally aspirated while using the stock cams AND without taking any torque from the bottom. Tell me and you can prove to everyone what you do and do not know.

So far I'm thinking just another one who isn't aware of what he doesn't know.
Guy
19 Conti GT in Dr Mayhem paint 08/24/2019
06 HD Street Bob
04 Buell XB12S Lightning


mwmosser

  • Illegitimi non carborundum
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 945
  • Karma: 2
  • Austin, TX, USA
Reply #61 on: August 14, 2020, 07:09:06 pm

 pdf page 178, the very same text. Which makes sense, on a single 500cc engine ...

http://www.royalenfieldlesite.fr/spip/IMG/pdf/manuel-entretien-roayl-enfield-500.pdf

There is a slight change though:
My bet is whoever copied this forgot this part in bold.

ECU fuel restrictions in neutral - we had that on our 2008 Acura TSX 6-speed (European Honda Accord). Could not rev past 7000 in neutral. Absolutely could rev to 8100 in gear.
Not at all surprised that there are errors in the manual.
2019 RE INT 650 Mark Three


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #62 on: August 14, 2020, 07:25:56 pm
Aren't there forums strictly dedicated to arguing, one upmanship and related obnoxiousness?

Tell me how you would get 58-60 HP from this engine naturally aspirated while using the stock cams AND without taking any torque from the bottom. Tell me and you can prove to everyone what you do and do not know.

So far I'm thinking just another one who isn't aware of what he doesn't know.

There are places where believers meet, wank together, and band against anyone that would contradict them, yes. If your alpha ego cannot fathom getting contradicted or proven wrong, i suggest either joining one of these, or taking the time to check if whatever you are writing is not wrong. Avoid calling people paranoid when they ask for said proofs, and you will probably not be met with obnoxious answers when you get your errors pointed.

As for your question, why should I answer ? I never made such a claim. I have a couple of answers, but the quantity of work or the lack of reliability involved makes it a moot point. And if any of us need to provide proof of whatever he writes, that would be you, since you never did so far. Unlike me.



« Last Edit: August 14, 2020, 07:52:30 pm by cyril31 »


Dr Mayhem

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
  • Karma: 0
Reply #63 on: August 14, 2020, 08:05:47 pm


This is what i think too.

I do not know the characteristics of the OEM cams, but you can easily see the difference in cam profile in the pic:
http://www.ss119.id/shop/high-compression-111-piston-kit-royal-enfield-650-twins/

The shape show a much faster and longer valve opening. I am a bit surprised by the duration though, 216/222 still feels a bit short for a race cam on a bike... but since the stock cam allows for 50ish HP, even a "short-ish" cam should net quite the improvement without sacrificing too much low/middle range. I would not be suprised to see 60HP from that cam and a remap alone.

You look at the dyno curves of that cam and you say "I do not know the characteristics of the OEM cams"... LoL... I was giving you way much more credit than you deserve! You know absolutely nothing about building Hi-Po naturally aspirated engines  ::)
Guy
19 Conti GT in Dr Mayhem paint 08/24/2019
06 HD Street Bob
04 Buell XB12S Lightning


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #64 on: August 14, 2020, 08:19:52 pm

You look at the dyno curves of that cam and you say "I do not know the characteristics of the OEM cams"... LoL... I was giving you way much more credit than you deserve! You know absolutely nothing about building Hi-Po naturally aspirated engines  ::)

Yes, i cannot guess the lift and duration of a set of cams by looking at a dyno. Nor can you. Nor can anyone.

Do you realize you are making a fool of yourself, after i took the time to explain where you made a mistake and you called me paranoid and obnoxious ? Do we need to get a moderator involved so we can have a civil discussion without your ego getting in the way ?


Dr Mayhem

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
  • Karma: 0
Reply #65 on: August 14, 2020, 08:24:16 pm
Yes, i cannot guess the lift and duration of a set of cams by looking at a dyno. Nor can you. Nor can anyone.

Do you realize you are making a fool of yourself, after i took the time to explain where you made a mistake and you called me paranoid and obnoxious ? Do we need to get a moderator involved so we can have a civil discussion without your ego getting in the way ?

Get hold of yourself eh!.. You're sounding much more than a LITTLE like a dim-whit 12 year old girl
« Last Edit: August 14, 2020, 08:30:00 pm by Dr Mayhem »
Guy
19 Conti GT in Dr Mayhem paint 08/24/2019
06 HD Street Bob
04 Buell XB12S Lightning


Bilgemaster

  • Just some guy
  • Global Moderator
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,386
  • Karma: 0
  • 2005 Bullet 500ES in "Mean Green" Military Trim
Reply #66 on: August 14, 2020, 09:00:47 pm
Let's please keep the tone civil and productive, OK? I don't see myself as here to officiate over schoolyard quarrels, but other members ARE beginning to complain. What started out as a nice solid topic with fat juicy metrics is starting to devolve into something resembling one of those Siberian Slap Fight contests, but maybe not so "butch."


Keep it nice, folks.
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.

(Legal enough to pass muster if they don't look too closely in Woodbridge, Virginia, where the buses don't run at night, holidays or weekends and I'm a contender for 'Village Idiot')


Dr Mayhem

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
  • Karma: 0
Reply #67 on: August 14, 2020, 09:05:20 pm
Let's please keep the tone civil and productive, OK? I don't see myself as here to officiate over schoolyard quarrels, but other members ARE beginning to complain. What started out as a nice solid topic with fat juicy metrics is starting to devolve into something resembling one of those Siberian Slap Fight contests, but maybe not so "butch."


Keep it nice, folks.

fine by me. well taken!  ;D
Guy
19 Conti GT in Dr Mayhem paint 08/24/2019
06 HD Street Bob
04 Buell XB12S Lightning


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #68 on: August 14, 2020, 11:28:03 pm
LS1's love a tune because they were tuned so sloppily from new. They run too rich and ignition curves are choppy and all over the place. Who you ask depends on whether it was on purpose or by mistake. Here's a good read. It's old now but LS motors are no spring chickens, either. Note the part where they mention the power gain with a failing fuel pump dropping pressure and leaning the AFR. (Disclaimer: I've never owned an LS, this is just what I've learned from reading and chatting with owners. My own carb fed SBC and I6 motors gained power/economy after cam, head, displacement, exhaust and carb changes).

https://www.oztrack.com.au/2013-09-27-06-14-12/ls1-tuning-explained

I think you're both right. A well tuned from factory engine needs more than a tune to make big power gains. But one hamstrung from the factory, there's room for improvement.
My point. But the sloppy LS 1 tunes (  I’ve spent a fair bit of time on Oztrack, etc also) were probably by intent, as they already knew how to squeeze them through the Corvettes . Same engines, same hardware, more power.
Cheers mate, Steve
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #69 on: August 14, 2020, 11:32:47 pm
There are places where believers meet, wank together, and band against anyone that would contradict them, yes. If your alpha ego cannot fathom getting contradicted or proven wrong, i suggest either joining one of these, or taking the time to check if whatever you are writing is not wrong. Avoid calling people paranoid when they ask for said proofs, and you will probably not be met with obnoxious answers when you get your errors pointed.

As for your question, why should I answer ? I never made such a claim. I have a couple of answers, but the quantity of work or the lack of reliability involved makes it a moot point. And if any of us need to provide proof of whatever he writes, that would be you, since you never did so far. Unlike me.
I’m not sure if that post was aimed at you or me or both of us Cyril! BTW , not doubting your knowledge or skills at all. Just cogitating on possibilities!👍
Cheers Steve
PS I totally agree with the comments posted about nastiness- civility is everything.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2020, 11:36:02 pm by Starpeve »
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


Haggisman

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 487
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, Australia.
Reply #70 on: August 15, 2020, 12:11:01 am
I used to own a Dnepr 650 (Russian) motorbike with a 7 to 1 compression ratio,  the manual suggested to use good quality 72 to 74 octane petrol for best performance. I can't remember its power or torque figures (not much)
2019 Interceptor


twocoolgliders

  • Cookie
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,565
  • Karma: 1
Reply #71 on: August 15, 2020, 12:27:17 am
I'm with Cyril on this one....everything he says, he backs up.

BTW  ran my bike between 5000 and 6000 a few times today....she really pulls hard in that range!  (wouldn't do that without fuel!)

Cookie


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #72 on: August 15, 2020, 01:40:02 am
I'm with Cyril on this one....everything he says, he backs up.

BTW  ran my bike between 5000 and 6000 a few times today....she really pulls hard in that range!  (wouldn't do that without fuel!)

Cookie
Only quoting the beloved tech manual my friend!
Steve
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


Haggisman

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 487
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, Australia.
Reply #73 on: August 15, 2020, 02:32:20 am
I used to own a Dnepr 650 (Russian) motorbike with a 7 to 1 compression ratio,  the manual suggested to use good quality 72 to 74 octane petrol for best performance. I can't remember its power or torque figures (not much)
Looked it up, apparently the Dnepr made 45HP on better octane fuel!
2019 Interceptor


Starpeve

  • Starpeve
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,468
  • Karma: 0
  • Adelaide, South Aust- Conti GT 650 2019
Reply #74 on: August 15, 2020, 02:46:20 am

To quote Btitney-“oops Idid it again.“ !
I’d rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy...


cyril31

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
  • Karma: 0
Reply #75 on: August 15, 2020, 09:17:57 am
I’m not sure if that post was aimed at you or me or both of us Cyril! BTW , not doubting your knowledge or skills at all. Just cogitating on possibilities!👍
Cheers Steve
PS I totally agree with the comments posted about nastiness- civility is everything.

I am not a native english speaker so sometimes i have a hard time explaining myself, and some figures of speech do not translate well.

It is actually hard to reason, the human brain is not wired for that. It is wired to follow people that think the same, to create groups, because groups have a stronger chance at survival. Evolution takes time ...
This is a known process. When someone believes in something, he is more likely to accept whatever he reads or hear that support that belief, and only doubt what does not. I am no exception, it took a lot of work to doubt even when something goes my way, and sometimes stuff still goes past that mechanism. I have some videos that explain books about it, which really helped me to understand this, but they are in French so it will probably be useless to you. If you are interested i can try to get the key ideas and books the guy develops, there surely are other videos in english that do the same.

What I meant is that everyone should question stuff when it is said without any kind of proof, especially when it support your own belief, as this is the kind of stuff we tend to give a free pass.

We are humans, we all make mistakes, and I include myself in there. I have posted stuff that was wrong too. I believe there is no shame in getting something wrong, or saying "hey you are right i was wrong". It require putting the ego a bit to the side, which hurts, a lot the first time, less the next, and after some time it does not much.

Anyway this also applies to me; if i say stuff without backing it, or if the explanation I give feels incomplete, off, or if people just do not understand, do not hesitate to doubt and ask. Improving knowledge is all about removing what we think is wrong, and accepting new stuff (that can be proven wrong too later). What i mean is do not believe blindly  ;)



tooseevee

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,706
  • Karma: 0
  • A Simple Twist Of Fate
Reply #76 on: August 15, 2020, 11:51:30 am
I am not a native english speaker so sometimes i have a hard time explaining myself, and some figures of speech do not translate well.

It is actually hard to reason, the human brain is not wired for that. It is wired to follow people that think the same, to create groups, because groups have a stronger chance at survival. Evolution takes time ...
This is a known process. When someone believes in something, he is more likely to accept whatever he reads or hear that support that belief, and only doubt what does not. I am no exception, it took a lot of work to doubt even when something goes my way, and sometimes stuff still goes past that mechanism. I have some videos that explain books about it, which really helped me to understand this, but they are in French so it will probably be useless to you. If you are interested i can try to get the key ideas and books the guy develops, there surely are other videos in english that do the same.

What I meant is that everyone should question stuff when it is said without any kind of proof, especially when it support your own belief, as this is the kind of stuff we tend to give a free pass.

We are humans, we all make mistakes, and I include myself in there. I have posted stuff that was wrong too. I believe there is no shame in getting something wrong, or saying "hey you are right i was wrong". It require putting the ego a bit to the side, which hurts, a lot the first time, less the next, and after some time it does not much.

Anyway this also applies to me; if i say stuff without backing it, or if the explanation I give feels incomplete, off, or if people just do not understand, do not hesitate to doubt and ask. Improving knowledge is all about removing what we think is wrong, and accepting new stuff (that can be proven wrong too later). What i mean is do not believe blindly  ;)

            Well said, English speaker or not  :) :)
'08 Black AVL Classic.ACEhead 9.8:1/manifold/canister. TM32/Open short bottle/hot tube removed. Pertronix Coil. Fed mandates removed. Gr.TCI. Bobber seat. Battery in right side case. Decomp&all doodads removed. '30s Lucas taillight/7" visored headlight. Much blackout & wire/electrical upgrades


Heavy Duty Mick

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: 1
Reply #77 on: March 01, 2021, 02:44:33 am
Lots of differing opinions here.

I don’t care if anyone likes or dislikes what I have done.

This bike makes me smile every time I ride it and that’s all I care about.

If other people choose to use any info that I have shared, that’s another reason to smile.

If people choose to disagree, that’s good too. If we all agreed, it’d be a very boring world.

First post for seven months.

Looking at some of the posts made since then is ... errr ... interesting.

Update on my Interceptor.
Now fitted with S&S Cycle camshaft along with their 865cc kit.

Will from Revelry Cycles/Royal Enfield Sydney loaded a map into the Powertronics ECU to suit my stock, unmodified cylinder head and throttle bodies.

He recommended that I fit a Rekluse Torq Drive clutch at the same time but being stubborn, I didn't. Less than 50km later I realised why he had said that they include the clutch as a standard part of all 865 builds.

Before the clutch went zing, i found that the whole bike is just nicer to ride. More power everywhere.

Will update when new clutch is fitted.


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #78 on: March 01, 2021, 10:09:01 am
First post for seven months.

Looking at some of the posts made since then is ... errr ... interesting.

Update on my Interceptor.
Now fitted with S&S Cycle camshaft along with their 865cc kit.

Will from Revelry Cycles/Royal Enfield Sydney loaded a map into the Powertronics ECU to suit my stock, unmodified cylinder head and throttle bodies.

He recommended that I fit a Rekluse Torq Drive clutch at the same time but being stubborn, I didn't. Less than 50km later I realised why he had said that they include the clutch as a standard part of all 865 builds.

Before the clutch went zing, i found that the whole bike is just nicer to ride. More power everywhere.

Will update when new clutch is fitted.
Thanks for the update, I was wondering where you had gone. Sorry about your clutch.
I notice that Rekluse uses the term "and tunable to handle high horsepower engines". Didi you have options whthin your choice?
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


Jack Straw

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 953
  • Karma: 0
  • Prescott, Arizona
Reply #79 on: March 01, 2021, 03:35:12 pm
I think an 865 build with related upgrades would be a fabulous ride.

Where's the gripe with intelligently conceived and well executed hop ups?  I admire the commitment in time and resources.
 
I'm surprised that any one would object to such a build.  It's the OPs' bike, and his time/money.

One might suggest simply buying a more powerful bike at the outset but that narrow point of view ignores the entire history and intent of hot rodding.

I'd say any objections are out of envy.

Interceptor 650, Honda VT500 Ascot at present
Norton Commando, Ducati Diana Mk. III, CB 500/570, KLR 650, Ducati 250 Scrambler, CB 350, Honda S 90, YDS-3, SV 650 and a few others in the past.


Heavy Duty Mick

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: 1
Reply #80 on: March 10, 2021, 03:13:03 am
My 865 was raced at Sydney Dragway last week by Will from Revelry Racing/Royal Enfield Sydney.

With a Rekluse Torq Drive clutch pack fitted, it held all of the available power.

While it was on the bench being re-clutched, the 15-tooth countershaft sprocket was replaced by one with 16 teeth. Along with the clutch, I recommend this change.

Horsepower and torque figures are unknown at this stage. In fact, I don't really care about those numbers.

For those that understand drag racing, it ran a pair of 12.8s, a couple of 13.0s and a 13.1-second pass. All of these passes were at 99 or 100mph.

Then I rode it home.

My 865 Interceptor is a bloody good thing. It's now easier to ride than a stocker and is a lot more fun in traffic. Most importantly, it makes me smile.


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #81 on: March 10, 2021, 04:10:53 am
My 865 was raced at Sydney Dragway last week by Will from Revelry Racing/Royal Enfield Sydney.

With a Rekluse Torq Drive clutch pack fitted, it held all of the available power.

While it was on the bench being re-clutched, the 15-tooth countershaft sprocket was replaced by one with 16 teeth. Along with the clutch, I recommend this change.

Horsepower and torque figures are unknown at this stage. In fact, I don't really care about those numbers.

For those that understand drag racing, it ran a pair of 12.8s, a couple of 13.0s and a 13.1-second pass. All of these passes were at 99 or 100mph.

Then I rode it home.

My 865 Interceptor is a bloody good thing. It's now easier to ride than a stocker and is a lot more fun in traffic. Most importantly, it makes me smile.
Wicked great news !
Motorcycles are for the soul.
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


Jack Straw

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 953
  • Karma: 0
  • Prescott, Arizona
Reply #82 on: March 10, 2021, 02:46:32 pm
That's terrific news but how can a guy live without dyno read-outs? :)

Interceptor 650, Honda VT500 Ascot at present
Norton Commando, Ducati Diana Mk. III, CB 500/570, KLR 650, Ducati 250 Scrambler, CB 350, Honda S 90, YDS-3, SV 650 and a few others in the past.


wfdTamar

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 7
  • Karma: 0
Reply #83 on: March 12, 2021, 08:26:32 am
Does anyone know how the Rekluse clutch compares to the S&S one?

Mick, are the maps Revelry did for your bike uploaded to PowerTronic (can anyone get access to them)?
« Last Edit: March 12, 2021, 08:28:41 am by wfdTamar »


Heavy Duty Mick

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: 1
Reply #84 on: March 28, 2021, 05:54:03 am
Does anyone know how the Rekluse clutch compares to the S&S one?

Mick, are the maps Revelry did for your bike uploaded to PowerTronic (can anyone get access to them)?

S&S Cycle sell the Rekluse Clutch.

Yes, the map is uploaded to PowerTronic. Anyone who wants to pay Revelry to build their bike can have the same base map.
If you're asking will I share it? The answer is a definite no.

To complete the story, my bike needs to go back to Sydney Dyno for finetuning. Will I share that map? The answer is also no, but in capitals -- NO.


GordonH

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 20
  • Karma: 0
Reply #85 on: March 28, 2021, 04:09:42 pm
My 865 was raced at Sydney Dragway last week by Will from Revelry Racing/Royal Enfield Sydney.

With a Rekluse Torq Drive clutch pack fitted, it held all of the available power.

While it was on the bench being re-clutched, the 15-tooth countershaft sprocket was replaced by one with 16 teeth. Along with the clutch, I recommend this change.

Horsepower and torque figures are unknown at this stage. In fact, I don't really care about those numbers.

For those that understand drag racing, it ran a pair of 12.8s, a couple of 13.0s and a 13.1-second pass. All of these passes were at 99 or 100mph.

Then I rode it home.

My 865 Interceptor is a bloody good thing. It's now easier to ride than a stocker and is a lot more fun in traffic. Most importantly, it makes me smile.

Brilliant!


Effektor

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • Karma: 0
Reply #86 on: March 28, 2021, 07:51:13 pm
I think an 865 build with related upgrades would be a fabulous ride.

Where's the gripe with intelligently conceived and well executed hop ups?  I admire the commitment in time and resources.
 
I'm surprised that any one would object to such a build.  It's the OPs' bike, and his time/money.

One might suggest simply buying a more powerful bike at the outset but that narrow point of view ignores the entire history and intent of hot rodding.

I'd say any objections are out of envy.

This.

Not to mention, something like a Speed Twin is heavier, has more electronics, and is much more expensive both to buy and modify. Then in the end, you have a bike that still doesn't look as good.  8)

If you want a Speed Twin, buy one. If you don't want a Speed Twin it would be pretty foolish to buy one just because it has a few extra HP.


Marcsen

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
  • Karma: 0
Reply #87 on: March 28, 2021, 09:46:39 pm
Would love to do the big bore kit along with the cam and dyno tune . But sadly most RE mechanics around here can only do break pads and chain lube .

We have a HD dealer around the corner but they laughed at me when i said big bore and RE .
« Last Edit: March 28, 2021, 09:53:52 pm by Marcsen »
Isle of rügen, germany .
Wachau austria


BC AVIATION

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 193
  • Karma: 0
Reply #88 on: March 28, 2021, 10:07:53 pm


If 650 cc is the problem...

850cc ain't the solution!


Cookie


Would love to do the big bore kit along with the cam and dyno tune . But sadly most RE mechanics around here can only do break pads and chain lube .

We have a HD dealer around the corner but they laughed at me when i said big bore and RE .


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #89 on: March 28, 2021, 10:32:52 pm

If 650 cc is the problem...

850cc ain't the solution!
Cookie
What is the solution? Seriously.
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


Voun

  • So far so good ...
  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 98
  • Karma: 0
  • 2021 Interceptor
Reply #90 on: March 28, 2021, 10:55:26 pm
But is there a problem ???


Effektor

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • Karma: 0
Reply #91 on: March 28, 2021, 11:15:22 pm
Remember, this is the internet, where everyone is an expert on what everyone else needs. ;D


BC AVIATION

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 193
  • Karma: 0
Reply #92 on: March 29, 2021, 12:10:26 am
1000cc race bike....1200 cc Bonneville, 1800 cc whatever....2500 cc, 165 HP triumph rocket...200+ hp sport bike...

Blowing out a 650 to 850 is a fun exercise but hardly worth the trouble...

Cookie



What is the solution? Seriously.


olhogrider

  • 650 Interceptor and C5
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,653
  • Karma: 1
  • VEGAS!
Reply #93 on: March 29, 2021, 12:26:55 am
1000cc race bike....1200 cc Bonneville, 1800 cc whatever....2500 cc, 165 HP triumph rocket...200+ hp sport bike...

Blowing out a 650 to 850 is a fun exercise but hardly worth the trouble...

Cookie

This from a guy who flies planes with NO ENGINE!!! ;) Any power is already too much.


BC AVIATION

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 193
  • Karma: 0
Reply #94 on: March 29, 2021, 12:37:49 am
LOL....

Yes my glider is faster than my motorcycle....

Made a couple of fast runs yesterday at over 120 MPH...at 6000'  (It can go a LOT faster than that!)

Cookie





This from a guy who flies planes with NO ENGINE!!! ;) Any power is already too much.


Bagonne

  • Hudson Valley, NY
  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 496
  • Karma: 0
Reply #95 on: March 29, 2021, 02:33:05 am
I think there's a guy here that spent this same amount on suspension upgrades not really understanding what he was getting or why, and then not liking the results. 

Why do we do things?  because we are compelled to do things, and then we die, having done some of those things. 


BC AVIATION

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 193
  • Karma: 0
Reply #96 on: March 29, 2021, 03:17:44 am
I understood completely....


Cookie



I think there's a guy here that spent this same amount on suspension upgrades not really understanding what he was getting or why, and then not liking the results. 

Why do we do things?  because we are compelled to do things, and then we die, having done some of those things.


Effektor

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • Karma: 0
Reply #97 on: March 29, 2021, 03:20:22 am
1000cc race bike....1200 cc Bonneville, 1800 cc whatever....2500 cc, 165 HP triumph rocket...200+ hp sport bike...

Blowing out a 650 to 850 is a fun exercise but hardly worth the trouble...

Cookie
This is what I don't get. None of those things are the same as a punched out Interceptor, so there's no point in even comparing them. Ignoring the more absurd examples, even the 1200 Bonnie is merely "close" to what someone who wants a big bore Interceptor might be looking for. In my case, it wasn't close enough, so I didn't waste money or time on it. Now admittedly, I'll probably never get around to a big bore kit, but it is a heck of a lot more appealing to me than what Triumph has done with the Bonnevilles.

Then of course there is the most glaring issue, the "trouble" is the fun for folks who like to wrench on stuff.


BC AVIATION

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 193
  • Karma: 0
Reply #98 on: March 29, 2021, 03:22:19 am
Hey if you want to spend a year, and whatever money and get 10 or 20 HP, and you like doing that go for it....I said it is a fun project...(but pointless IMHO)

If you think a 60 HP bike is better than a 47 HP bike, then why not just  buy a 200 HP bike?

If you think a 100 mph bike is too slow, what is a 112 MPH bike doing for you?  Go buy a 186 mph bike!






I think there's a guy here that spent this same amount on suspension upgrades not really understanding what he was getting or why, and then not liking the results. 

Why do we do things?  because we are compelled to do things, and then we die, having done some of those things.


BC AVIATION

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 193
  • Karma: 0
Reply #99 on: March 29, 2021, 03:24:43 am
So your INT goes 112, and mine goes 100...ok you win!  Slow and slower compared to "fast" bikes out there....




Cookie


This is what I don't get. None of those things are the same as a punched out Interceptor, so there's no point in even comparing them. Ignoring the more absurd examples, even the 1200 Bonnie is merely "close" to what someone who wants a big bore Interceptor might be looking for. In my case, it wasn't close enough, so I didn't waste money or time on it. Now admittedly, I'll probably never get around to a big bore kit, but it is a heck of a lot more appealing to me than what Triumph has done with the Bonnevilles.

Then of course there is the most glaring issue, the "trouble" is the fun for folks who like to wrench on stuff.


Effektor

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • Karma: 0
Reply #100 on: March 29, 2021, 03:29:16 am
So your INT goes 112, and mine goes 100...ok you win!  Slow and slower compared to "fast" bikes out there....




Cookie
You seem to be the only one trying to turn it into a competition, I don't think anyone else cares. I ride my bikes, not yours.


gizzo

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,370
  • Karma: 0
  • Live slow, die whenever
Reply #101 on: March 29, 2021, 04:39:02 am
You seem to be the only one trying to turn it into a competition, I don't think anyone else cares. I ride my bikes, not yours.

Right on.
My mate has spent over $5k hotting up his Grom. Do I think it's a waste of money? Yep (so does he). Do I tell he's wrong? No way. It's his business and it's fun keeping up with his build.
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM


Blazingatom

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 230
  • Karma: 0
Reply #102 on: March 29, 2021, 11:05:46 am
Cookie stop being a troll, there are a few members that constantly put down peoples chosen upgrades and say what’s the point.

First off they earned the money so let them do what they want, second imagine how boring the forum would become if everyone rode stock bikes.Thirdly RE have clearly stated they designed the bike from the get go with the idea people would modify it else they would have partnered with S&S and carried out all the collaborations
Ex-REME aircraft technician
Current bike: Conti GT 650
Previous bikes: Aprilia RS50, Cagiva Mito Evo, zx7r, TL1000r featured in PB, zx6r, Fireblade


ace.cafe

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 14,298
  • Karma: 0
  • World leaders in performance/racing Bullets
Reply #103 on: March 29, 2021, 02:04:22 pm
I can jump in on this because, as an Enfield modder, I have been fielding this question for a decade.

Question:
Why not just buy a faster bike?

Answer:
Because my bike has certain style and characteristics which made me choose it over other bikes, and I want to keep it, but I'd like it to be a bit faster for wahatever reason. Other bikes don't suit my tastes, so they are not candidates just because they happen to have more power.
Home of the Fireball 535 !


CPJS

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 192
  • Karma: 0
Reply #104 on: March 29, 2021, 02:11:08 pm
I can jump in on this because, as an Enfield modder, I have been fielding this question for a decade.

Question:
Why not just buy a faster bike?

Answer:
Because my bike has certain style and characteristics which made me choose it over other bikes, and I want to keep it, but I'd like it to be a bit faster for wahatever reason. Other bikes don't suit my tastes, so they are not candidates just because they happen to have more power.

And I enjoy the process of working on it into what I see as a better bike that gives me more enjoyment.
And I can afford to spend my money how I wish.
Current bikes.
R E GT650
BMW R1200GS
Honda CRF250L
BSA B25SS

Still young enough not to care, too old to remember why.


Breezin

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 359
  • Karma: 0
  • Ireland; 2019 Interceptor
Reply #105 on: March 29, 2021, 02:58:29 pm
Why do we do things?  because we are compelled to do things, and then we die, having done some of those things.

Looking at time left on planet (TLOP), I think riding the Interceptor will have to come ahead of modifying!



Hoiho

  • Engorged Member
  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 483
  • Karma: 0
  • NZ - 2020 GT 650
Reply #106 on: March 29, 2021, 08:42:26 pm
Looking at time left on planet (TLOP), I think riding the Interceptor will have to come ahead of modifying!



True - TLOP is often over estimated...


Warwick

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 233
  • Karma: 0
Reply #107 on: March 29, 2021, 09:27:13 pm
Why do modifications on a bike? Because its fun  :)
cheers and beers
Warwick
2007 Bullet, 1999 Lightning, 1994 Honda CBR1000f, 2010 Honda VFR1200f, 2007 Kawasaki GPX 250, 2019 Interceptor


gizzo

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,370
  • Karma: 0
  • Live slow, die whenever
Reply #108 on: March 29, 2021, 09:54:51 pm
Cookie stop being a troll, there are a few members that constantly put down peoples chosen upgrades and say what’s the point.


The same cookie who spent 2k on suspension he didn't need. Should have bought a ducati....  ::)
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM


Jako

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: 0
Reply #109 on: March 29, 2021, 10:14:30 pm
I really admire  the way Heavyduty Mick shares his 865 build info with us but doesn't  waste his time defending his choices, very classy just like his bike. 
2020 Rav Red Interceptor (wife's bike) ,Interceptor 2019 bakers express


zimmemr

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,361
  • Karma: 0
Reply #110 on: March 29, 2021, 10:42:33 pm
Some guys see a new bike as a collection of parts, assembled by the OEM to make it easier for you to get it home where you can start tearing it down and build what you really want.

Other guys see a finished, "perfect" motorcycle.

Most of us are somewhere in between, but whatever anyone wants to do to his or her bike is their own business. If someone asks for your opinion, by all means you should provide it. If not... 8)


gizzo

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,370
  • Karma: 0
  • Live slow, die whenever
Reply #111 on: March 29, 2021, 11:22:15 pm
I really admire  the way Heavyduty Mick shares his 865 build info with us but doesn't  waste his time defending his choices, very classy just like his bike.
Yup.
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM


Heavy Duty Mick

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 34
  • Karma: 1
Reply #112 on: March 30, 2021, 02:31:01 pm
Just checked in for the first time since posting earlier this month.

You trolls should seriously fuck off and find another hobby.

Sitting in front of the screen and batting off while bagging everyone else's efforts is really very sad. And pointless.

As well as the 865, I also have a 124cube M8 Softail that makes me smile, and a Hayabusa dragbike that also makes me smile.

I build and modify bikes that make me smile. Not you. Me.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2021, 02:33:07 pm by Heavy Duty Mick »


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #113 on: March 30, 2021, 02:53:58 pm
Just checked in for the first time since posting earlier this month.

You trolls should seriously fuck off and find another hobby.

Sitting in front of the screen and batting off while bagging everyone else's efforts is really very sad. And pointless.

As well as the 865, I also have a 124cube M8 Softail that makes me smile, and a Hayabusa dragbike that also makes me smile.

I build and modify bikes that make me smile. Not you. Me.
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


zimmemr

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,361
  • Karma: 0
Reply #114 on: March 30, 2021, 04:52:43 pm
Just checked in for the first time since posting earlier this month.

You trolls should seriously fuck off and find another hobby.

Sitting in front of the screen and batting off while bagging everyone else's efforts is really very sad. And pointless.

As well as the 865, I also have a 124cube M8 Softail that makes me smile, and a Hayabusa dragbike that also makes me smile.

I build and modify bikes that make me smile. Not you. Me.

Well said.


Bentouttashape

  • 20 Interceptor
  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 3
  • Karma: 0
Reply #115 on: March 30, 2021, 10:52:16 pm
How about we talk about which oil is the best? a nice safe non-controversial subject like that???

Ive spent over 60 years riding, wrenching, restoring and hotrodding vehicles. And winning races and trophies.

I just bought an Interceptor because I can set the valves without tearing down the engine and investing in more tools.

Over the last 6 years I have owned and modded a Hyabusa, Suzuki 4 banger, BMW R75/6, , Triumph T100, Triumph T120, Moto Guzzi V7 etc etc etc wait a min lemme tell you about my Flathead Ford that I got from 90 HP to 170 HP .... now thats a labour of insanity... just buy a SBC V8 and be done... nope I did it because I like to. Same as the RE, its going to have the 2 - 1 pipe added plus a weight loss program to make it lighter and more like my old Triumph 500 Desert Sled. Some of you have lost your sense of humour.
Shiny Side Up


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #116 on: March 30, 2021, 11:15:44 pm
How about we talk about which oil is the best? a nice safe non-controversial subject like that???

Ive spent over 60 years riding, wrenching, restoring and hotrodding vehicles. And winning races and trophies.

I just bought an Interceptor because I can set the valves without tearing down the engine and investing in more tools.

Over the last 6 years I have owned and modded a Hyabusa, Suzuki 4 banger, BMW R75/6, , Triumph T100, Triumph T120, Moto Guzzi V7 etc etc etc wait a min lemme tell you about my Flathead Ford that I got from 90 HP to 170 HP .... now thats a labour of insanity... just buy a SBC V8 and be done... nope I did it because I like to. Same as the RE, its going to have the 2 - 1 pipe added plus a weight loss program to make it lighter and more like my old Triumph 500 Desert Sled. Some of you have lost your sense of humour.
Flathead Fords have soul. Welcome.
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


Jack Straw

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 953
  • Karma: 0
  • Prescott, Arizona
Reply #117 on: March 30, 2021, 11:31:18 pm
Good Lord, so much agida.
Interceptor 650, Honda VT500 Ascot at present
Norton Commando, Ducati Diana Mk. III, CB 500/570, KLR 650, Ducati 250 Scrambler, CB 350, Honda S 90, YDS-3, SV 650 and a few others in the past.


Effektor

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • Karma: 0
Reply #118 on: March 31, 2021, 01:17:47 am
lemme tell you about my Flathead Ford that I got from 90 HP to 170 HP .... now thats a labour of insanity... just buy a SBC V8 and be done... nope I did it because I like to. Same as the RE, its going to have the 2 - 1 pipe added plus a weight loss program to make it lighter and more like my old Triumph 500 Desert Sled. Some of you have lost your sense of humour.
You think that's bad, try building a Y-block these days! Talk a bout a labor of insanity!

I guess someone forgot to tell us we weren't supposed to be having fun.  8)

My 2 into 1 is sitting on the shelf right now waiting for a rainy day.


BlackIce619

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 82
  • Karma: 0
Reply #119 on: April 02, 2021, 12:07:15 am
I am just happy I joined this forum recently. I have a problem with not wanting to own any vehicle or motorcycle "stock". Ton of knowledge here... All that is missing is a couple beers between us.

Going to go spend some money on +1hp more.
2019 RE Continental GT 650 - Ice Queen


agagliardi

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
  • Karma: 0
Reply #120 on: April 02, 2021, 05:13:59 pm
Tough crowd. Mr. Cookie is getting a thrashing.  Jack Straw is already a rock star(racing Ducatis, Guitars, luthier), and he even uses Italian-agita. I am impressed.

But this agita is logical vs. emotional brain. Cookie is using the logical side of his brain- Why spend all that money and time on modification when for about the same money spent on these mods you could probably find a used 600cc  Jap sportbike that would trounce any modified RE 650 in every way? Logical brain. But most of us use our emotional brain, which sometimes gets us in trouble.  Ask all of us divorcees about that.

But emotionally when you start up that machine that you just successfully modified, and feel that extra speed or performance, there is nothing like that charge and satisfaction. Hey, maybe some even get they're rocks off and smoke a cigarette, I don't know.

I may get thrashed for playing psychologist!




1988 Super Magna, 2000 Harley Softail, 2004 Hayabusa,
2020 Royal Enfield Interceptor, 2004 Corvette


Effektor

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • Karma: 0
Reply #121 on: April 02, 2021, 05:39:13 pm

But this agita is logical vs. emotional brain. Cookie is using the logical side of his brain- Why spend all that money and time on modification when for about the same money spent on these mods you could probably find a used 600cc  Jap sportbike that would trounce any modified RE 650 in every way? Logical brain.
No thrashing intended, just offering a bit of perspective!  ;D
Logically, an used jap sport bike is excessive for what most riders can legally do with it, making even it an emotional choice. In the developed world, riding a motor cycle is almost always an emotional decision.

Having said that, the logic argument falls apart for another reason. The person trying to apply "logic" is looking at things from an illogical perspective. They're tying to apply their priorities to someone else's decisions. Wanting "more performance" doesn't mean "most performance". If that was the case, the argument would be to buy a BMW S1000RRM, which is an utterly absurd choice for someone that wants a classically styled bike with a moderate riding position for commuting, running up to the local for a pint and a burger, or cruising around the lakes at 35-45 for an afternoon.

The logical choice for someone who finds the almost perfect bike but wants a few more horsepower and a few fewer lbs is to throw a couple grand at it and making it perfectly suit their needs.  It's illogical to buy something completely different from what they want just because it has something the almost perfect bike doesn't have but can easily be added. It's like selling your dream house to move into an aging doublewide because you don't like the color of the carpet. ;D


zimmemr

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,361
  • Karma: 0
Reply #122 on: April 02, 2021, 05:51:02 pm
No thrashing intended, just offering a bit of perspective!  ;D
Logically, an used jap sport bike is excessive for what most riders can legally do with it, making even it an emotional choice. In the developed world, riding a motor cycle is almost always an emotional decision.

Having said that, the logic argument falls apart for another reason. The person trying to apply "logic" is looking at things from an illogical perspective. They're tying to apply their priorities to someone else's decisions. Wanting "more performance" doesn't mean "most performance". If that was the case, the argument would be to buy a BMW S1000RRM, which is an utterly absurd choice for someone that wants a classically styled bike with a moderate riding position for commuting, running up to the local for a pint and a burger, or cruising around the lakes at 35-45 for an afternoon.

The logical choice for someone who finds the almost perfect bike but wants a few more horsepower and a few fewer lbs is to throw a couple grand at it and making it perfectly suit their needs.  It's illogical to buy something completely different from what they want just because it has something the almost perfect bike doesn't have but can easily be added. It's like selling your dream house to move into an aging doublewide because you don't like the color of the carpet. ;D


All good points but I'd suggest that if you live in a developed country, i.e. one where a motorcycle is considered a sporting device as opposed to a country where they're used for basic transportation, very few motorcycle related decisions are based on logic. Hell, I'm 67 and have been riding for 54 years. I've yet to base a single decision related to riding on logic. ;) ;) ;)


NVDucati

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,689
  • Karma: 1
  • USA 2020 INT
Reply #123 on: April 02, 2021, 06:52:51 pm
My motorcycle modification logic starts and stops where my passion impinges on the supply of my basic needs such as food and shelter ;).
Member: AMA
Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT


zimmemr

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,361
  • Karma: 0
Reply #124 on: April 02, 2021, 07:09:51 pm
My motorcycle modification logic starts and stops where my passion impinges on the supply of my basic needs such as food and shelter ;).

Your logic is impeccable sir.  ;)

"I've made a lot of money in my life, a lot of which I spent on motorcycles, the rest I wasted on food and shelter." ANON.


Jack Straw

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 953
  • Karma: 0
  • Prescott, Arizona
Reply #125 on: April 02, 2021, 07:15:14 pm
OK guys, once again, breathe deep, then back away from the keyboards and ride your motorcycles.  It always helps. 8)
Interceptor 650, Honda VT500 Ascot at present
Norton Commando, Ducati Diana Mk. III, CB 500/570, KLR 650, Ducati 250 Scrambler, CB 350, Honda S 90, YDS-3, SV 650 and a few others in the past.


agagliardi

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
  • Karma: 0
Reply #126 on: April 02, 2021, 07:44:04 pm
That's why I enjoy  this forum so much.  Great comments.

And we are all old enough to remember Clockwork Orange!
1988 Super Magna, 2000 Harley Softail, 2004 Hayabusa,
2020 Royal Enfield Interceptor, 2004 Corvette


zimmemr

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,361
  • Karma: 0
Reply #127 on: April 02, 2021, 08:13:42 pm
OK guys, once again, breathe deep, then back away from the keyboards and ride your motorcycles.  It always helps. 8)

That was my game plan but it's too wet, too cold and too windy to ride here today. So I'm killing my time while waiting for the paint to dry on a honey-do project, by virtually flapping my gums. ;)


GravyDavy

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
  • Karma: 0
Reply #128 on: April 02, 2021, 11:35:18 pm
OK guys, once again, breathe deep, then back away from the keyboards and ride your motorcycles.  It always helps. 8)

Does anybody in any motorcycle forum actually ride?  According to some, we're all pimply millenials posting from our mom's basement!


Hoiho

  • Engorged Member
  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 483
  • Karma: 0
  • NZ - 2020 GT 650
Reply #129 on: April 03, 2021, 12:35:17 am
Does anybody in any motorcycle forum actually ride?  According to some, we're all pimply millenials posting from our mom's basement!

Gentlemen to bed, for tomorrow we ride. (Leaving at 2pm-ish)

https://youtu.be/K8BPP4ASQWo


zimmemr

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,361
  • Karma: 0
Reply #130 on: April 03, 2021, 01:28:52 am
Does anybody in any motorcycle forum actually ride?  According to some, we're all pimply millenials posting from our mom's basement!

Sunday morning 8 AM Putnam diner in Pawling NY, be there or be square. 8)


olhogrider

  • 650 Interceptor and C5
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,653
  • Karma: 1
  • VEGAS!
Reply #131 on: April 08, 2021, 12:44:26 am
Does anybody in any motorcycle forum actually ride?  According to some, we're all pimply millenials posting from our mom's basement!
Millennials are in their 30s. You know you're getting old when 30 year olds are punk kids. ;)

I think the term you're looking for is Gen Z. But that might be zombies for all I know.


Jack Straw

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 953
  • Karma: 0
  • Prescott, Arizona
Reply #132 on: April 08, 2021, 01:36:45 am
+1!!!!!!!!  I'm pretty sure I've come across a couple, three on this forum. ::)
« Last Edit: April 08, 2021, 01:40:16 am by Jack Straw »
Interceptor 650, Honda VT500 Ascot at present
Norton Commando, Ducati Diana Mk. III, CB 500/570, KLR 650, Ducati 250 Scrambler, CB 350, Honda S 90, YDS-3, SV 650 and a few others in the past.


GravyDavy

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
  • Karma: 0
Reply #133 on: April 09, 2021, 01:21:36 am
Millennials are in their 30s. You know you're getting old when 30 year olds are punk kids. ;)

I think the term you're looking for is Gen Z. But that might be zombies for all I know.

Hell, I was being kind. Pretty sure we're mostly a bunch of wrinkly Boomers.

But Aye, Lads, to bed! For we rise at daybreak!

and then pee and go back to bed for a couple of hours to let the Aleve kick in


Semanticks

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
  • Karma: 0
  • 2019 Interceptor Ravishing Red
Reply #134 on: April 09, 2021, 03:12:41 am
There are millennials amongst you.... But they're busy playing motorcycle racing games on their phones....

While the boomers wait for the Aleve, we'll be drinking fancy coffee and while you remember what bikes were like in the 60s, we try to capture what we imagine they were like. Skateboarding feels more dangerous now, so I ride to get that feeling back. I haven't loved riding anything this much since I was 20!
South Okanagan BC

2019 Interceptor Ravishing Red


gizzo

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,370
  • Karma: 0
  • Live slow, die whenever
Reply #135 on: April 09, 2021, 05:32:14 am
Hell, I was being kind. Pretty sure we're mostly a bunch of wrinkly Boomers.



My dad's a boomer. Gen X whipper-snapper, me. Too old for a skateboard but too young for a Mal (but ride both anyway).
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM


Breezin

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 359
  • Karma: 0
  • Ireland; 2019 Interceptor
Reply #136 on: April 09, 2021, 09:58:01 am
I'm a boomer (just), and my next task is to find out what the hell Aleve is!  ???


Morgan60

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 156
  • Karma: 0
  • NW USA
Reply #137 on: April 09, 2021, 11:16:49 am
Does anybody in any motorcycle forum actually ride?  According to some, we're all pimply millenials posting from our mom's basement!
Yes I do ride most every day year round. I’ve ridden my motorcycle in all fifty states and in all of the ten Canadian Provinces. With one exception Hawaii I rented a HD Street Glide for two days. For my long distance riding I’ve used a Moto Guzzi now retired, for the last ten years I now ride Harley Davidsons. Do I come to look or post on motorcycle forums every day or week? NO, I would rather ride than talk about riding.
REs I currently own:
2007 AVL Bullet Electra Gray
2010 Bullet G5 Deluxe Black
2017 535 GT Continental Red
2018 Himalayan White
2018 Pegasus Green
2019 650 Continental GT Ice Queen or white
2020 Trials 500 Green and Chrome


zimmemr

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,361
  • Karma: 0
Reply #138 on: April 09, 2021, 02:14:00 pm
Does anybody in any motorcycle forum actually ride?  According to some, we're all pimply millenials posting from our mom's basement!

I don't ride every day, but I do something related to motorcycles or riding every day.


viczena

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 369
  • Karma: 1
Reply #139 on: April 09, 2021, 02:23:41 pm
Its an old thread, but nearly 30% increase of low rpm torque is impressive. HP dont do much for fun and ridability, torque does.
www.enfieldtech.de
Harley CVO EGlide, Boss Hoss 502, BMW 1200 RT, Harley Panhead , Harley Davidson &Marlboro Man Bike BD2, Royal Enfield Trials. And some more.


wachuko

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 584
  • Karma: 0
  • '21 Continental GT 650
Reply #140 on: April 09, 2021, 02:32:05 pm
I am just happy I joined this forum recently. I have a problem with not wanting to own any vehicle or motorcycle "stock". Ton of knowledge here... All that is missing is a couple beers between us.

Going to go spend some money on +1hp more.

Welcome to the forum!!  Why not go for the full 5HP increase?   :D :D

Ride safe!
Wachuko
'19 BMW F 850 GS Adventure
‘21 Royal Enfield Continental GT 650


GravyDavy

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
  • Karma: 0
Reply #141 on: April 09, 2021, 02:35:55 pm
I'm a boomer (just), and my next task is to find out what the hell Aleve is!  ???
Naproxen sodium


Breezin

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 359
  • Karma: 0
  • Ireland; 2019 Interceptor
Reply #142 on: April 09, 2021, 02:48:11 pm
Naproxen sodium
Thanks. My education continues...


BlackIce619

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 82
  • Karma: 0
Reply #143 on: April 09, 2021, 03:41:07 pm
Does anybody in any motorcycle forum actually ride?  According to some, we're all pimply millenials posting from our mom's basement!

Yes! How else do you learn all the upgrades you want/need? I do have the interest to take this out to track or ride aggressively in the mountains. At the moment stock tires don't give me that comfort as of yet.
2019 RE Continental GT 650 - Ice Queen


GravyDavy

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 228
  • Karma: 0
Reply #144 on: April 09, 2021, 04:46:59 pm
Yes! How else do you learn all the upgrades you want/need? I do have the interest to take this out to track or ride aggressively in the mountains. At the moment stock tires don't give me that comfort as of yet.
The stock tires were clearly chosen strictly for the look. Nearly everybody reports that replacing them makes a clear improvement.


YellowDuck

  • Scooter
  • **
  • Posts: 21
  • Karma: 0
Reply #145 on: April 09, 2021, 05:19:40 pm
Great thread.  I've been on both sides of the fence.  Modded the **** out of a Ducati Sport Classic to try to turn it into a competent race bike (total suspension, steering damper, wheels, brakes, track bodywork, intake pods, exhaust, fuel map, pegs, controls, probably a bunch more stuff I have forgotten).  A bunch of that I would have done even if I wasn't racing it because honestly, at that time I enjoyed wrenching almost as much as riding.

This bike (once it arrives), is about just having a sweet little road bike to go riding on, mostly with my teenage daughter on her CBR250R.  No time for spinning wrenches these days really.  It will do exactly what I want it to do in 100% stock form, and look good doing it.

Both are perfectly legitimate ways of enjoying this hobby.  To each their own.

(But honestly, given my past irrational compulsion to needlessly modify perfectly good bikes, I may need to join a support group to stick to the above plan.  Can we start a thread for that?)

« Last Edit: April 09, 2021, 05:24:51 pm by YellowDuck »


olhogrider

  • 650 Interceptor and C5
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,653
  • Karma: 1
  • VEGAS!
Reply #146 on: April 10, 2021, 05:08:44 pm
Hell, I was being kind. Pretty sure we're mostly a bunch of wrinkly Boomers.

But Aye, Lads, to bed! For we rise at daybreak!

and then pee and go back to bed for a couple of hours to let the Aleve kick in
Damn! I thought I had the camera turned off on this computer!


CPJS

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 192
  • Karma: 0
Reply #147 on: April 10, 2021, 06:19:58 pm
Great thread.  I've been on both sides of the fence.  Modded the **** out of a Ducati Sport Classic to try to turn it into a competent race bike (total suspension, steering damper, wheels, brakes, track bodywork, intake pods, exhaust, fuel map, pegs, controls, probably a bunch more stuff I have forgotten).  A bunch of that I would have done even if I wasn't racing it because honestly, at that time I enjoyed wrenching almost as much as riding.

This bike (once it arrives), is about just having a sweet little road bike to go riding on, mostly with my teenage daughter on her CBR250R.  No time for spinning wrenches these days really.  It will do exactly what I want it to do in 100% stock form, and look good doing it.

Both are perfectly legitimate ways of enjoying this hobby.  To each their own.

(But honestly, given my past irrational compulsion to needlessly modify perfectly good bikes, I may need to join a support group to stick to the above plan.  Can we start a thread for that?)



Join that support group now, you will need it.
My bets are on you wanting to fix the suspension before the first service.
Current bikes.
R E GT650
BMW R1200GS
Honda CRF250L
BSA B25SS

Still young enough not to care, too old to remember why.


Jack Straw

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 953
  • Karma: 0
  • Prescott, Arizona
Reply #148 on: April 10, 2021, 06:38:26 pm
I've been modding my vehicles forever....since my first bicycle (it sure looked cool with that chopped front fender).  My present Interceptor is no exception but honestly the bike is so good I could happily go back to bone stock with the exception of the tires and
seat and be quite happy with it.
Interceptor 650, Honda VT500 Ascot at present
Norton Commando, Ducati Diana Mk. III, CB 500/570, KLR 650, Ducati 250 Scrambler, CB 350, Honda S 90, YDS-3, SV 650 and a few others in the past.