Author Topic: Front Wheel and HandleBar misalignment  (Read 331 times)

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thepankaj

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on: May 28, 2020, 06:25:52 am
I own 350 classic gun metal grey.
Few days back i got into a very small accident (35kmph) and my front wheel got slammed into the vehicle ahead.
it was a very small impact and bike didn't even fell on ground.
Since then I am facing the misalignment of the front wheel and handlebar. If I keep handlebar straight the front wheel is slightly tilted to the right and in order to ride bike straight handlebar tilts slightly to the left.
I went to service center but they were very ignorant and said they don't see any problem. They as well told me that it could be bent in the handlebar or the front forks. but i dont see any bent in handlebar with bare eyes.
I insisted them to check but even after that neither they find anything nor they cured.
I still suspect it could be front fork misalignment, but i just want to make sure if its that and service centre is being ignorant.


Bilgemaster

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Reply #1 on: May 28, 2020, 03:38:03 pm
If you think something is bent, then something is probably bent...maybe not much, but bent all the same. 35 kph is about 22 miles per hour, and more than just a "love tap". I'd suggest you find another garage or service center to look at it.

In the meantime, you're new here, so I'd also suggest you search this Forum for likely keywords such as "bent fork" to read what other members have experienced. After all, you're not the first Bulleteer to hit something! That knowledge may help inform your future discussions with mechanics about what they might look more closely at.

Best of luck sorting her out!
« Last Edit: May 28, 2020, 03:42:57 pm by Bilgemaster »
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Stanley

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Reply #2 on: May 28, 2020, 05:51:08 pm
Holding the front brake lever, press the handlebars down to compress the forks. A bent fork tube will bind in mid-stroke and will need replacement or straightening in a press. If they don't bind, loosen the bottom caps that hold the axle but leave them in place. Loosen the pinch bolts on the lower triple clamp that grip the fork tubes but leave them in place. Loosening the top fastenings is a bit involved so let's save that for later. Now try compressing the forks for a few times, pumping up and down as far as you can. This will settle the forks and axle into the "normal" position they were in before your collision. Tighten the fasteners and try riding it. Sometimes that's enough to correct alignment of a fork after a collision. I've bent a few forks but it takes a lot to bend them. If this doesn't help try removing the front wheel so you can spin the axle in its bearings to inspect for a bent axle. Also check the handlebars for wrinkles in the chrome plating that may signal bending.
Hope this helps.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2020, 05:54:40 pm by Stanley »


olhogrider

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Reply #3 on: June 07, 2020, 08:47:19 pm
Holding the front brake lever, press the handlebars down to compress the forks. A bent fork tube will bind in mid-stroke and will need replacement or straightening in a press. If they don't bind, loosen the bottom caps that hold the axle but leave them in place. Loosen the pinch bolts on the lower triple clamp that grip the fork tubes but leave them in place. Loosening the top fastenings is a bit involved so let's save that for later. Now try compressing the forks for a few times, pumping up and down as far as you can. This will settle the forks and axle into the "normal" position they were in before your collision. Tighten the fasteners and try riding it. Sometimes that's enough to correct alignment of a fork after a collision. I've bent a few forks but it takes a lot to bend them. If this doesn't help try removing the front wheel so you can spin the axle in its bearings to inspect for a bent axle. Also check the handlebars for wrinkles in the chrome plating that may signal bending.
Hope this helps.

Well said! Always start with the cheapest solution. If it doesn't work then you can start changing parts.


Arizoni

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Reply #4 on: June 23, 2020, 10:51:00 pm
Sounds like a case of a slightly twisted fork to me.

The old method of fixing this was to straddle the front wheel with one's legs while looking at the rear of the motorcycle.  Moving the legs together so they tightly fit against the wheel and fender, grasp both grips on the handle bar and give a forceful twist to the handle bar.
I might have this backwards but I would apply the twist by pulling with my right hand (that's holding the left handlebar grip) while pushing with my left hand (that's holding the right handlebar grip).
That little "tweek" should fix it.  If it doesn't, try loosening the bolts that tighten the lower steering head stock first and then doing the "twist" operation again.  If you do loosen the bolts, don't forget to re-tighten them before you take it for a test ride to see if it fixed the problem.
Jim
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hpwaco

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Reply #5 on: June 28, 2020, 03:52:36 am
Back in the OLDE days, used to find a tree or telephone pole and bang the front wheel against it until I was satisfied the alignment.  It was a lot easier on the knees!!!!!