Author Topic: Tappet adjustment and that evil rubber gasket  (Read 629 times)

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agagliardi

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on: May 23, 2020, 11:33:15 pm
Did the first valve tappet adjustment today. I'm not too proud to say there are some problems.  everything's pretty cool until trying to remove the valve cover. These engines are apparently assembled and then put into the frame, as expected. However, in britbike tradition, service is not an engineering priority. There is no room to slide the cover off. Going to the left is somewhat less painful. If you can do it without scratches/minor damage to the cover my hats off. I scratched the top, and did nick an area of the inner groove for the gasket. That brings us to that evil rubber gasket. I would say poor design. You can go nuts trying to get it to stay put during assembly. I tried every approach, and the "grease " trick, no luck. I finally smeared permatec blue gasket maker( what I had ) to hold the gasket on the headcover  while carefully squeezing it from the left into position. That was the only way possible that I could determine. I reviewed all the videos,  Stuart Fillingham , etc. If there is a trick to make head cover/gasket installation easier, Get it before doing the service.  All said, the job is done, no leaks, and no visible scratches( very minor one on the cover hidden by the tank).

Also the plug gaps were much greater than the specified .7 to .8.  .

And, I,  rotated the crank bolt/engine COUNTER CLOCKWISE
1988 Super Magna, 2000 Harley Softail, 2004 Hayabusa,
2020 Royal Enfield Interceptor, 2004 Corvette


Jako

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Reply #1 on: May 24, 2020, 01:14:00 am
I had similar experience , had to rotate the crank  to lower the rocker arms as I moved the cover into place. I will remove the horns next time, hopefully  that mIght provide more clearance.
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NVDucati

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Reply #2 on: May 24, 2020, 01:20:26 am
Did the first valve tappet adjustment today. I'm not too proud to say there are some problems.  everything's pretty cool until trying to remove the valve cover. ... There is no room to slide the cover off. Going to the left is somewhat less painful. If you can do it without scratches/minor damage to the cover my hats off. I scratched the top, and did nick an area of the inner groove for the gasket. That brings us to that evil rubber gasket. I would say poor design. You can go nuts trying to get it to stay put during assembly. I tried every approach, and the "grease " trick, no luck. I finally smeared permatec blue gasket maker( what I had ) to hold the gasket on the headcover  while carefully squeezing it from the left into position. That was the only way possible that I could determine. I reviewed all the videos,  Stuart Fillingham , etc. If there is a trick to make head cover/gasket installation easier, Get it before doing the service.  All said, the job is done, no leaks, and no visible scratches( very minor one on the cover hidden by the tank).
Glad you got it done and sorry it was so frustrating. But at least you still have that half-a-grand in your account.
I watched those same videos before I did mine, too. One thing that I noticed was that they were all doing it for the first time themselves. No black-belt valve adjusters in the batch that I watched. They all struggled with the valve cover and some fast forwarded the tape.

So having only done it once _ it wasn't so bad. Here is what I learned;
You really do have to remove the horns.
You really do have to unbolt the CPU tray. I used some just right wooden blocks to raise and hold it out of the way (no hands).
For me, the path to remove the cover was to "roll" it forward and down towards the front wheel.
Then slide it left to right out to the throttle side.
Do it slowly. I did drape a shop towel over the top of it, but it never touched.
Obviously, it goes back on in reverse. Slide back via the front of the engine from right to left.  And "arc" it back up and over.
AS for that gasket. Before I even tried _ I practiced mounting the cover once without it. That way I wasn't doing two things at once for the first time. I just used motor oil to hold it in place. But with the cover laying cavity side up, I used my finger to push it down all the way around in order to remove any air. That helps with "stick-tion".
Putting it on I reached my left arm under the backbone and held that half-round rubber plug with my ring finger. I used my right hand index finger and pinky to hold the corners of the gasket in place. My two thumbs held the shop rag across the top. I did loose a small section of the gasket (center/rear). I had kept my feeler gauges out and used a mid size to slide under the cover (barley lifting it at all) and put the gasket back into the grove.

So that was a little long winded, but I hope it can lower the frustration and hesitance.
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agagliardi

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Reply #3 on: May 24, 2020, 02:48:03 am
Thanks for the input, NV.  I had taken off the horns, they were not really an obstacle. I think when you rotated the engine to move rockers that was key and brilliant. Wish I had thought of that. Regardless it is a tricky affair. I am surprised there were not more comments and issues expressed by our fellow members. I suspect many of our riders may be having the work done by the "professionals". If so, I do't blame them!
1988 Super Magna, 2000 Harley Softail, 2004 Hayabusa,
2020 Royal Enfield Interceptor, 2004 Corvette


wildbill

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Reply #4 on: May 24, 2020, 04:52:25 am
I had a go at it and it wasn't a picnic- here's the clip I did on it

 https://youtu.be/qgGyJabfmiU


agagliardi

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Reply #5 on: May 24, 2020, 01:51:28 pm
Great work Wild Bill. You would think that the designers would have made the groove to hold the gasket below on the head instead of the head cover considering uh gravity(?)

My 88 Magna is a similar nightmare times 20, but what those clever Japanese did is to make the head cover in 2 pieces and groove the lower surfaces, with  2 similar (to the RE) rubber gaskets, even with the 1/2 moon but the stay in place, 2 thinner sections are workable. I have adjusted the 16 screw and locknut rockers every 8k up t0 55K.

Anyways, it is what it is. Minor abrasions and nicks in the head cover are going to happen, I'm sure even if performed by the "pros". You just won't notice! AHH ignorance is truly bliss.
1988 Super Magna, 2000 Harley Softail, 2004 Hayabusa,
2020 Royal Enfield Interceptor, 2004 Corvette


BRG-BIRD

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Reply #6 on: May 24, 2020, 02:23:56 pm
There’s no doubt that gasket is fussy to get installed properly. :)


olhogrider

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Reply #7 on: May 25, 2020, 01:39:18 am
Wow! I didn't move my horns and while it's a bit fiddly I had no trouble putting the cover in place. The gasket can be glued to the cover. I used 3M spray adhesive because that's what I had. Do that before you start adjusting and it will be ready when you are ready to put it back on. Yes, they should have designed it with the groove in the head but it's easy if you use glue. Did you loosen the brake module and lift it out of the way? That is key!


wildbill

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Reply #8 on: May 25, 2020, 02:03:05 am
true. I had a lot of trouble getting the tank unclipped and far more drama getting that gasket back on the head and a far greater bit of luck the bike actually worked afterwards and still does ;D


20MarkIII

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Reply #9 on: May 25, 2020, 02:47:29 am
A few scratches on the valve cover are inevitable IMO. I had a can of 'Never Dull wadding polish' at home and though it takes a couple of applications does work and works well on the engine side cases too.


fjrwheels

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Reply #10 on: May 28, 2020, 07:14:24 pm
I have also done the tappers on my Int650.
I picked up a tip from somewhere that really works. Losses the three bolts and remove, that hold the ABS in place.
 Carefully lift and hold in place with a wedge, I used the handle of a screwdriver, and slide the cover out forward and to the left.
I used black gasket RTV, works a treat holding it in place.
Hope this helps


BRG-BIRD

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Reply #11 on: May 29, 2020, 03:29:48 am
I just did the inspection again last weekend for something to do and I was curious if the valve clearances had changed in the 1,000 since the initial check/adjustment, no change.

I suspect the gasket will become easier to work with in time as it forms to the shape of the cover. I was able to get the gasket back in place without removing the gasket and breaking the half moon seal.

It was fiddly and took some time but went easier than the first. The first adjustment it had to be removed and a small amount of sealer used to hold it in place for installation.


Bassman1

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Reply #12 on: May 31, 2020, 12:11:10 am
I has a struggle getting the main fuel line unclipped when removing the tank (why do they make those push buttons so difficult to access and almost impossible to press unless you have tiny fingers ?! I also had trouble getting the gasket to stay in place when refitting the cover, and ended up using a thin covering of gasket sealant all around the grooves to hold it in place.  But the biggest problem i had, was when i removes the 4 rocker cover bolts? only the front 2 bolt holes had seal-washers in place, and the rear 2 bolts nothing, just a dab a sealant around the thread of the bolt. I thought it didn't look right, but as it was a new bike (well,ex demo bike that i'd bought from a dealer with only 59 miles on the clock) and i was doing the first 300 mile service tappet adjustment,  i stupidly just assumed that the rear 2 bolt holes must have been designed not to use washers. Big mistake - when i started the bike up after re-assembly, oil was seeping out of the top of the rocker cover via one of the rear rocker cover bolt heads.  So either the factory forgot to fit seal-washers to the rear 2 bolts at point of manufacture, or someone (the dealer ?) must have had the rocker cover off during the first 59 miles (no idea why ?) and lost the washers and decided to dab a bit of sealant around the thread instead ?!  Also, i found that all 4 tappets were very 'tight' and needed slacking off to achieve the correct clearances (so looks like the original factory or dealer setup, was very wrong anyway ?!).  Anyway, unfortunately i've had to order some washers via Moto UK, but they're on back order (awaiting shipment from India in 2 to 4 weeks) so annoyingly, i now can't use the bike at all until the replacement washers arrive !


Richard230

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Reply #13 on: May 31, 2020, 01:31:52 am
I has a struggle getting the main fuel line unclipped when removing the tank (why do they make those push buttons so difficult to access and almost impossible to press unless you have tiny fingers ?! I also had trouble getting the gasket to stay in place when refitting the cover, and ended up using a thin covering of gasket sealant all around the grooves to hold it in place.  But the biggest problem i had, was when i removes the 4 rocker cover bolts? only the front 2 bolt holes had seal-washers in place, and the rear 2 bolts nothing, just a dab a sealant around the thread of the bolt. I thought it didn't look right, but as it was a new bike (well,ex demo bike that i'd bought from a dealer with only 59 miles on the clock) and i was doing the first 300 mile service tappet adjustment,  i stupidly just assumed that the rear 2 bolt holes must have been designed not to use washers. Big mistake - when i started the bike up after re-assembly, oil was seeping out of the top of the rocker cover via one of the rear rocker cover bolt heads.  So either the factory forgot to fit seal-washers to the rear 2 bolts at point of manufacture, or someone (the dealer ?) must have had the rocker cover off during the first 59 miles (no idea why ?) and lost the washers and decided to dab a bit of sealant around the thread instead ?!  Also, i found that all 4 tappets were very 'tight' and needed slacking off to achieve the correct clearances (so looks like the original factory or dealer setup, was very wrong anyway ?!).  Anyway, unfortunately i've had to order some washers via Moto UK, but they're on back order (awaiting shipment from India in 2 to 4 weeks) so annoyingly, i now can't use the bike at all until the replacement washers arrive !

I bet you could find a replacement washer at your local hardware store. Just take one of the proper washers to the store and find a couple of washers that match those.  Washers are a dime a dozen and come in every size and thickness imaginable.
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NVDucati

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Reply #14 on: May 31, 2020, 01:39:06 am
I has a struggle getting the main fuel line unclipped when removing the tank (why do they make those push buttons so difficult to access and almost impossible to press unless you have tiny fingers ?!...
  Anyway, unfortunately i've had to order some washers via Moto UK, but they're on back order (awaiting shipment from India in 2 to 4 weeks) so annoyingly, i now can't use the bike at all until the replacement washers arrive !
- I'm with ya about that fuel line clip !!! Awful. I ended up cutting off the a finger and thumb of a rubber glove and stuffing two little nuts I had in that kitchen draw in them at my finger tips.
- As for the washers: Surely you (or your dealer) can take one of the ones you still have and fashion two more from neoprene or a o-ring, etc.  2 to 4 weeks with a new bike staring at you is too cruel.
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