Author Topic: 2014 Continental GT fork oil replacement  (Read 1863 times)

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KD5ITM

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on: April 14, 2020, 08:23:59 pm
I've got a copy of the service manual for the Continental GT. I've been a forklift mechanic for the past 12 years. But have never remove the forks from a motorcycle.

I know from experience working on equipment that is built in other countries and trying to use the dodgy service manual. Is the Continental GT manual spot on when it comes to removing and replacing the fork oil or should I be looking for a second opinion?

Better yet, is there a link to a video that shows how to change the fork oil from start to finish? I have done a quick search on YouTube and found a few videos but nothing for the Continental GT.
2014 Continental GT - red
1979 Hurst/Olds W-30 - whit and gold
1964 Volvo PV544 - desert sand
1961 Willys Jeep Utility Wagon - saturn yellow
2014 Trek Madone 5.9
2013 Specialized Carve Pro


hpwaco

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Reply #1 on: April 15, 2020, 03:46:10 am
Service manual worked for me on my 14GT, although whole process is a pain.   Amount of oem "oil" in each tube was different and really nasty.   Refill with quality fork oil ( brand and weight of your choice ) in amount specified.  I used 10w.    Be sure to reinstall springs with the ends with fewer coils upward.   Hitchcock's did offer adjustable caps.  Hope all goes well.    Cheers.   HP


JerryGT

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Reply #2 on: April 15, 2020, 11:56:50 pm
To replace that stinky factory fork oil, just follow the manual, it´s not that difficult.
Separating the inner and outer Tubes is a pain in the Butt and you will need a special tool.


Jerry
Teaching a pig how to fly is counterproductive and most of the time it results in a pissed-off pig.

Continental GT 535


gizzo

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Reply #3 on: April 16, 2020, 01:15:21 am

Separating the inner and outer Tubes is a pain in the Butt and you will need a special tool.



Yeah, a nut gun and a sharpened broomstick?
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM


hpwaco

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Reply #4 on: April 16, 2020, 03:17:21 am
Separating what inner and outer tubes and why???????


gizzo

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Reply #5 on: April 16, 2020, 05:22:54 am
Separating what inner and outer tubes and why???????

Good point. Only do this if you're changing fork seals. Fork oil only is a no brainer.
simon from south Australia
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KD5ITM

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Reply #6 on: April 20, 2020, 07:33:11 pm
So I'm a forklift mechanic and used to working on hydraulic cylinders. Rule of thumb is you always replace the seals. When changing the fork oil, do you have to remove any part of the forks in a way that would require replacing the seals or can the fork oil be changed without needing to replace the seals. All of my seals are still in good condition.
2014 Continental GT - red
1979 Hurst/Olds W-30 - whit and gold
1964 Volvo PV544 - desert sand
1961 Willys Jeep Utility Wagon - saturn yellow
2014 Trek Madone 5.9
2013 Specialized Carve Pro


Richard230

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Reply #7 on: April 20, 2020, 10:25:18 pm
If the GT's forks are anything like the forks of my Bullet, you just turn them upside down, dump out the old oil and dump in the new oil.  No seals need to be disturbed.  :) The only hard part was loosening the fork caps. That was a major operation for me.  :(
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


hpwaco

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Reply #8 on: April 21, 2020, 01:30:52 am
Probably mentioned in service manual, but be sure to loosen the fork tube caps first.


gizzo

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Reply #9 on: April 21, 2020, 02:26:19 am
I've got a copy of the service manual for the Continental GT. I've been a forklift mechanic for the past 12 years. But have never remove the forks from a motorcycle.

I know from experience working on equipment that is built in other countries and trying to use the dodgy service manual. Is the Continental GT manual spot on when it comes to removing and replacing the fork oil or should I be looking for a second opinion?

Better yet, is there a link to a video that shows how to change the fork oil from start to finish? I have done a quick search on YouTube and found a few videos but nothing for the Continental GT.

You could try using the search function. There's been plenty of discussion about fork oil on this forum, including some input from your good self where you sounded like you were speaking from experience. Maybe you were talking about forklift forks though?  ;)
https://forum.classicmotorworks.com/index.php?topic=26017.msg299847#msg299847

Seriously it's not a hard job even for a forklift mechanic.
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM


Farmer_John

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Reply #10 on: April 23, 2020, 11:58:11 pm
You could try using the search function. There's been plenty of discussion about fork oil on this forum, including some input from your good self where you sounded like you were speaking from experience. Maybe you were talking about forklift forks though?  ;)
https://forum.classicmotorworks.com/index.php?topic=26017.msg299847#msg299847

Seriously it's not a hard job even for a forklift mechanic.

Gizzo, some things never change. It’s almost like I never took a break.
"It's not what you know, it's how well you reference what you don't"

"Ain't no hill too high for a mountain climber"

Words to succeed by...


gizzo

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Reply #11 on: April 24, 2020, 04:36:27 am
Good morning,  FJ. How you been?
simon from south Australia
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Farmer_John

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Reply #12 on: April 24, 2020, 01:11:11 pm
I’m good man. Just tryin to stay sane in a not so sane world.
"It's not what you know, it's how well you reference what you don't"

"Ain't no hill too high for a mountain climber"

Words to succeed by...


JerryGT

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Reply #13 on: April 29, 2020, 01:00:46 pm
I read and hear very often that a SAE 10W fork oil is recommended, when changing the GTs fork oil.
But you should know that a 10W from one manufacturer doesn't even come close to that of another manufacturer.
Important when comparing fork oil is the kinematic viscosity in Centistroke cSt or mm² / s at 40 ° C or 100°F.
If you compare oils under this information, you can see very large differences.

For example:
Castrol Mineral fork oil 10W is indicated with 32 cSt, Castrol Synthetic fork oil 10W with 42 cSt, the latter is almost 10% heavier, despite the same SAE and 42 cSt is also the viscosity of a Liqui Moly Motorbike Fork Oil 15W heavy Synthetic.

You can see that you should not rely on the SAE number, but always look in the data sheet of the respective oil.
By the way, a fork oil with about 22-25 cSt has turned out to be ideal for me.


Jerry
Teaching a pig how to fly is counterproductive and most of the time it results in a pissed-off pig.

Continental GT 535


gizzo

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Reply #14 on: April 29, 2020, 01:13:02 pm
Good info. Thanks for sharing. 8)
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM