Author Topic: Turn over,freeing pistons  (Read 1352 times)

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Mike flanagan

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on: February 10, 2020, 01:27:42 am
So i ordered a socket,per hitchcocks info,1.9/16.too small for spocket nut.This socket was big,but not enough.How the hell does this come off!!?I wanted to try to free pistons to remove cylinders.


Bilgemaster

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Reply #1 on: February 10, 2020, 04:33:13 am
So i ordered a socket,per hitchcocks info,1.9/16.too small for spocket nut.This socket was big,but not enough.How the hell does this come off!!?I wanted to try to free pistons to remove cylinders.

Just to clarify, are you trying to say that you ordered a 19/16ths inch (or 1-3/16ths inch) socket from Hitchcocks or on their recommendation, and it is too small? If so, and you live in the States, I've two suggestions: 1) measure the nut in question, and then swing on by your local auto parts joint or joints. They often offer free loaner tools like sets of those larger-sized impact sockets with a deposit. See if they've got a set with a socket that measures up, or failing that, 2) buy one to match from Home Depot or somewhere. The URREA line from Home Depot run anywhere from $3 to $15 a pop, depending on size.

Harbor Freight also sells kits as well as individual sockets. For example, the very next larger SAE size from what I can only presume may be your 1-3/16" already in hand would be this 1-1/4" one for the princely sum of about 4 bucks, or closer to 3 with a 20% off coupon. They've also got a 25% off coupon on breaker bars good 'til the end of February. And why not grab yourself a nice freebie while you're at it?
« Last Edit: February 10, 2020, 05:14:22 am by Bilgemaster »
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Mike flanagan

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Reply #2 on: February 10, 2020, 11:39:26 am
I ordered a 1 and 9/16 th socket,US spec ,that i saw speced(the nut) on hitchcocks parts list for my meteor minor.This is a big socket,biggest ive seen.I suspect it must be british standard.I could not find this socket on Hitch.site via search query.Im going to measure w calipers,but meantime im going to try to leaver the barrels off with heat.They have been soaking long.I bought a new seafoam product,deep creap,we will see.I really want to salvage as many original parts as possible,though ive already found my combustion chambers look like swiss cheese.The skirts go so deep into the cases i know this will be a heart breaker..


Adrian II

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Reply #3 on: February 10, 2020, 01:33:20 pm
This might be some important info for you.

https://www.samstagsales.com/whitworth_table.htm

A.
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grumbern

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Reply #4 on: February 10, 2020, 03:54:36 pm
I just used a 52mm socket. Those are much cheaper here and better to obtain ;)
As for the "how": With a lot of oil and waiting.


Bilgemaster

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Reply #5 on: February 10, 2020, 05:37:32 pm
This might be some important info for you.

https://www.samstagsales.com/whitworth_table.htm

A.

Ah yes..."Whitworth"...the bane of American owners of classic British vehicles. Unfortunately, many Whitworth sizes have no direct SAE or metric equivalent. For example, the 1/4 Whitworth (also known as 5/16 BS or "British Standard") is awkwardly between a 1/2" and 9/16" or a 13mm and 14mm such that even trying the 9/16" or 14mm is almost guaranteed to round out and ruin a 1/4 Whitworth fastener, and my old Norton is festooned with the goddamned things.

One problem with Whitworth tools is that you really pay a premium for them, when you can find them at all. They're such specialty items that you often end up paying Rolls Royce money for a Walmart tool that you might then end up using once every couple of years, if that. That's why nothing quite makes this old cheapskate's heart skip a beat so joyfully as when I stumble across some old Whitworth wrench or socket when pawing through a thrift store tool bin. That's my "happy place" while the wife scans those clothes racks like a Terminator (cue the "duh-dump dump duh-dump" beat).

This is just a hunch, but if your 1-9/16" (or 1.5625") socket is just a hair too small for that nut (say a tenth of an inch or so across the flats), then you could well be looking at a 1. Whitworth (or 1-1/8 BS), which measures 1.670", just a hair over 1-2/3", or 42.42 mm across the flats. Sadly, that's one of those awkward Whitworth sizes, but also kind of a likely one. But instead of paying close to 200 bucks for a proper 1. Whitworth socket, you might get away with a 43 mm metric one for about a tenth of the cost if you stuffed a piece of paper and maybe a dab of valve grinding paste into the socket to take up only about that 1/2 mm of slop. Then a 43 mm might grip just fine. You'll also likely need a little drive adapter, since 43 mm sockets are typically available only in those larger 3/4 or 1 inch drive sizes. Here's a 43mm with 3/4" drive on Amazon for less than $20.

So, go ahead and measure that nut. I'm curious to know what you've got there.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2020, 05:43:50 pm by Bilgemaster »
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grumbern

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Reply #6 on: February 10, 2020, 05:59:44 pm
52mm (2" across) it is ::)



ERC

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Reply #7 on: February 10, 2020, 06:02:56 pm
52 mm is the correct size for that nut.   ERC
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Bilgemaster

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Reply #8 on: February 10, 2020, 06:07:27 pm
I just used a 52mm socket. Those are much cheaper here and better to obtain ;)
As for the "how": With a lot of oil and waiting.

Ahhhh....So maybe that's a 1-1/4 Whitworth. That 52mm would be a better and snugger "close equivalent" for it than a 43mm for a 1 Whitworth, so that would be good. Here's a 52mm on Amazon for 28 bucks, but you might be able to do better than that "out there".

Update: Yup!...Here's one for $19.65 with free shipping, and it's a 1/2" drive one to boot.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2020, 06:57:42 pm by Bilgemaster »
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Mike flanagan

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Reply #9 on: February 11, 2020, 04:31:25 am
52mm it measures.You are correct.tnx grumbern.


cyrusb

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Reply #10 on: February 13, 2020, 09:06:08 pm
The cylinders can be rebored, that makes the pistons worthless. Either way they are worthless. Take a chisel to them and get on with it. Bringing a mill back from that state is not for the faint of heart. Always be on the lookout for more twins.
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grumbern

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Reply #11 on: February 14, 2020, 08:37:05 am
I wouldn't recommend a chisel, because the liners are pretty thin and can break easily, if too much force is applied. This will make the barrel close to worthless. I'd try a combination of oil and heat to free the pistons and light force with a mallet and a pice of hard wood to the dome of the pistons.


cyrusb

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Reply #12 on: February 14, 2020, 02:11:50 pm
I agree, If there were liners. Remember this is old tech. Thats a cast iron lump. Stay away from the walls and bust out the centers. Or not....
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grumbern

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Reply #13 on: February 14, 2020, 02:18:30 pm
Well, then call it sleeves, or whatever it's called. I'm not a native speaker, so there's some terms not picked quite right, sorry! :-[ If the pistons are corroded and stuck to the barrel, you might easily break the thin sleeve that sticks into the crank case. Then the only option would be to press in an actual liner and that's a lot of trouble, compared to so more time consuming, but more gentle removal technique. You might even damage the con rods, if not performed carefuly. :o

Andreas
« Last Edit: February 14, 2020, 05:36:31 pm by grumbern »


cyrusb

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Reply #14 on: February 14, 2020, 03:22:08 pm
Those thin sections that enter the crankcase are called spigots, and yes you can damage them if you are not careful. Not a native speaker? Where do you hail from?
2005E Fixed and or Replaced: ignition, fenders,chainguard,wires,carb,headlight,seat,tailight,sprockets,chain,shocks,fork springs, exhaust system, horn,shifter,clutch arm, trafficators.