Author Topic: Pinging  (Read 3164 times)

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gizzo

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on: December 20, 2019, 12:02:08 pm
Today going to work in the heat, the CGT was pinging taking off from the lights or accelerating at rpms it's usually happy with. Had to be pretty gentle and use more revs than usual to get a ping free getaway. Coming home after the cool change had hit, it was back to normal. Temp going to work was 45 deg c,  so prolly a bit warmer on the road. Coming home was much nicer at around 34 deg. 
Just an observation. Maybe the PC V needs a hot weather map with retarded ignition.
simon from south Australia
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ace.cafe

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Reply #1 on: December 20, 2019, 02:00:03 pm
Try some premium fuel or octane booster.
Xylene(the paint thinner) works good with a 5% add mix. Same with toluene. Both should be available at paint/hardware stores at lower cost than pre-bottled octane boost products that are weak and overpriced. I recommend limiting it to 5% add mix. Theoretically you can do a bit more, but probably not a good idea.

Both of those chemicals are actually commonly used as octane additives in premium gasoline formulas that you get at the pump.
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gizzo

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Reply #2 on: December 20, 2019, 05:32:43 pm
That's a great idea. I even have some xylene in my shed. Use it for thinning Goop. I'll give it a try. Hopefully I don't have to go riding in that stupid hot weather though. We just had 5 days over 40 deg.  I'm not into it.
simon from south Australia
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jez

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Reply #3 on: December 21, 2019, 12:41:47 am
If that doesn't work try a colder plug


gizzo

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Reply #4 on: December 21, 2019, 02:44:52 am
It's all good. It doesn't get ridden very often in that kind of heat. Thanks for the input though. I could probably get away with putting a tank of 98 in it on those days.
simon from south Australia
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SSdriver

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Reply #5 on: December 21, 2019, 02:31:31 pm
If it hasn't been doing this before, Could just be water in fuel?
Just a thought...Jimmy
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gizzo

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Reply #6 on: December 21, 2019, 03:55:13 pm
Not that. I'm pretty sure it was just the excessive temperature that day.
But you raise a point: if there was water, how would you get it out? We can't run the tank on reserve to let any water drain away. My wife's monster had an extremely rusty tank from the water sitting in there for so long. Until the side of the tank rusted through. Was a big job rebuilding that.
simon from south Australia
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ace.cafe

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Reply #7 on: December 21, 2019, 04:38:29 pm
Not that. I'm pretty sure it was just the excessive temperature that day.
But you raise a point: if there was water, how would you get it out? We can't run the tank on reserve to let any water drain away. My wife's monster had an extremely rusty tank from the water sitting in there for so long. Until the side of the tank rusted through. Was a big job rebuilding that.

Gas dryer additive.
It is basically a gas line anti-freeze product consisting of alcohol, which is hygroscopic and absorbs water from the gasoline. It then passes thru more normally.
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Richard230

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Reply #8 on: December 21, 2019, 04:41:45 pm
Gas dryer additive.
It is basically a gas line anti-freeze product consisting of alcohol, which is hygroscopic and absorbs water from the gasoline. It then passes thru more normally.

So should we be happy that a lot of the gasoline in the U.S. contains at least 10% ethanol?   ::)
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ace.cafe

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Reply #9 on: December 21, 2019, 05:27:52 pm
So should we be happy that a lot of the gasoline in the U.S. contains at least 10% ethanol?   ::)
For a winter formulation, there are some advantages to the alcohol. Cold weather causes water to condense out of the air.
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KD5ITM

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Reply #10 on: December 21, 2019, 07:21:39 pm
I would avoid ethanol gas at all cost. It doesn't do anything to improve gas mileage. It destroys rubber fuel lines and carburetor seals. It also creates moisture in gasoline and lowers the shelf life of gasoline.

In my GT I use stable ethanol formula each fill up.

In my 61 Willys wagon, 64 Volvo, and 79 Hurst/Olds I run down to the local Municipal Airport where I have access too low lead 100 Avgas without the people complaining. Low lead 100 have gas has no ethanol and has a much much longer shelf life. All of my hot rods only get driven on the weekends and to and from car shows so paying five bucks a gallon isn't that bad when I'm only feeling up every 3 to 6 months. I'm not sure load LED 100 Avgas wouldn't be practical for the GT. So I just add stabil ethanol treatment along with using premium gas.
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gizzo

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Reply #11 on: December 22, 2019, 09:20:45 am
Gas dryer additive.
It is basically a gas line anti-freeze product consisting of alcohol, which is hygroscopic and absorbs water from the gasoline. It then passes thru more normally.
Ah, right. I doubt that's even a thing here. It never goes below freezing, thank goodness. We do have e10 so I  could run a tank of that once in a while I guess.

I did the experiment a whole ago with a jar of petrol with some water, just to see how much gets the alcohol can absorb. It's not much, right?  But as an ongoing thing, it would probably work.  The monster, though, it had about 3litres of water below fuel pump level. Need more than a tank of e10 to soak that up  ;D .the water drain is fixed now, so it shouldn't happen again.

We have e85 here now, too. The street machine crowd have embraced it.
simon from south Australia
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Pantah
Monster
DR250
DRZ400SM


gizzo

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Reply #12 on: December 22, 2019, 09:36:32 am
I would avoid ethanol gas at all cost. It doesn't do anything to improve gas mileage. It destroys rubber fuel lines and carburetor seals. It also creates moisture in gasoline and lowers the shelf life of gasoline.


I'm not too worried about the odd tank of e10 in my bike. It would only be there for a few hours. 
simon from south Australia
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ace.cafe

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Reply #13 on: December 22, 2019, 01:44:27 pm
Ah, right. I doubt that's even a thing here. It never goes below freezing, thank goodness. We do have e10 so I  could run a tank of that once in a while I guess.

I did the experiment a whole ago with a jar of petrol with some water, just to see how much gets the alcohol can absorb. It's not much, right?  But as an ongoing thing, it would probably work.  The monster, though, it had about 3litres of water below fuel pump level. Need more than a tank of e10 to soak that up  ;D .the water drain is fixed now, so it shouldn't happen again.

We have e85 here now, too. The street machine crowd have embraced it.
One of the more popular ones here in the USA is "Heet". It was once basically methanol, but now they have an isopropyl formula.

For 3 liters of water, naturally that would not be solved with an additive. Additives are for small amounts of water condensed out of the atmosphere on cold days.

E85 is great for hot rods because you can run much higher compression and get more power. It might not be so convenient though, if your vehicle is not Flex-Fuel, and has a fixed tune for E85, if fuel stations aren't everywhere.
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Reply #14 on: December 22, 2019, 11:58:36 pm
I think with a motorcycle that is built in India, made to run in the high temperatures that are found in much of India, on Indian gasoline which isn't the best stuff, the most likely cause of pinging on the Royal Enfield UCE's is the rider is "lugging" the engine while trying to accelerate.

I've often ridden in 108 degree F temperatures using 87 octane gasoline and the only time I've heard a hint of a ping, shifting down a gear before accelerating solved the problem.
Jim
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