Author Topic: Winter Accessories for my C5  (Read 3126 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

axman88

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Karma: 0
  • Vintage Motorcycle Fan
on: November 11, 2019, 01:21:05 am
I installed my winter accouterments on my 2012 C5 Desert Storm today.

I'm afraid I gave up a little visual cool, in exchange for what I hope will be a little less physical chill for me, and a very few dollars spent.
 
Included is a small windscreen, some quilted handlebar muffs, and a pair of lowers I made for my engine guard.  Here's how it looked beforehand:

The windscreen came from Amazon, shipped for around $40.
 https://www.amazon.com/Windshield-Kawasaki-Davidson-Sportster-Boulevard/dp/B0192KW3VC/ref=sr_1_29?crid=18YE00Z847FVV&keywords=motorcycle+windscreen&qid=1573430249&sprefix=motorcycle+wind%2Caps%2C218&sr=8-29

It comes with all the hardware, but the handlebar clamps don't really grip the bar tightly enough to be secure, so I added struts to stabilize to the fork clamp bolts.  These were made of .050 5052 aluminum, bent to a 3/4 x 1/2 channel with an flange at the bottom end.  I also wrapped two layers of adhesive backed .040 rubber sheet around the bars to give a more secure mount at the handlebar.  With this extra fussing, the windscreen is secure, but still on the small side.

The mitts were mine for less than $10, including shipping, from a seller in China.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Waterproof-Motorcycle-Handlebar-Gloves-Hand-Muffs-Motorbike-Thermal-Warm-Mitts/372747742880?hash=item56c97f2ea0:g:yi4AAOSwPg9cEIUz


The lowers I fabricated from two 10 x 20 cutoffs of .050 5052 aluminum sheet that I rescued from the scrap pile at my employer.  if I wasn't so fortunate as to work for an employer with a metal shop, I could have bought the aluminum online for around $25.  https://www.onlinemetals.com/en/buy/aluminum/0-05-aluminum-sheet-5052-h32/pid/7127, but I would probably have used the 1/8" thick HIPS plastic sheet that I already had and used to create a pattern.  I might even have tried corroplast.
 
The lowers are just nylock strapped to the engine guard, and have to be considered as disposable, extending as they do, beyond the guard.  This is they first year I've put on winter gear.  I'm not expecting a whole lot of comfort for my $50, but I expect it will help.
The stock EFI engine in my machine, definitely doesn't care much for the cold, it's a little harder to start, sometimes taking up to 3 kicks, and misses badly at 1/4 throttle until it's warmed up.  Once it is good and warmed up though, it seems to run as strong as ever and quieter than in summer.


9fingers

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
  • Karma: 0
  • From the New Hampshire part of New Jersey
Reply #1 on: November 11, 2019, 03:37:25 am
Interesting ideas. I like the hand grip muffs, kind of dorky but warm hands are good! How does your bike like the extra wind resistance? That is a lot of surface area you are pushing. Also, it would look a lot better if you painted the engine shields desert tan.
9fingers
Currently own:
2016 Classic Chrome Maroon
V Strom 650 ABS Adventure
Beta Rev 3 270
Honda TLR200 custom
Honda TL 250 TMI custom frame
Honda TL 125
Yamaha TY350


axman88

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Karma: 0
  • Vintage Motorcycle Fan
Reply #2 on: November 11, 2019, 04:36:55 am
How does your bike like the extra wind resistance? That is a lot of surface area you are pushing.

It doesn't actually add much to the overall square footage, compared to ME plus the bike but it does move the center of effort of the wind resistance forward.  I figure I'm in the vicinity of 9 sf seated on the bike.  The windscreen is around 1.8 sf, but this is all area that my torso is occupying anyways.  The lowers are about 2.5 sf, and the majority of that is added area.

The bike didn't handle any different with the windscreen that I noticed.  I haven't ridden it with the lowers yet, nor at speed above 60 with the windscreen, so we'll see.  The C5 isn't a fast bike to begin with, and the bulk of my riding is on city streets at less than 50, so it's kind of a moot point, but I'll find out.

There's some bad weather coming, and I didn't want to delay installing the stuff any longer, so I didn't bother painting.  Maybe next year, after the lowers prove their worth, and if they survive, they'll get painted, or I might even try banging some 3 dimensional shape into them.  By that time, they'll be surface oxidized and more receptive to paint.  For now they still have that peel and stick plastic on the forward face, protecting the silver anodize.


mattsz

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,518
  • Karma: 0
  • moto-gurdyist
Reply #3 on: November 11, 2019, 10:49:32 am
The mitts were mine for less than $10, including shipping, from a seller in China.

You could have carved up those old wellies buried in the back of the closet and saved yourself a few bucks:



I found that image here: https://www.motorang.com/motorrad/winterfahrer_tips.htm.  I can't read it, but there's some very interesting photographs of some cold-weather mods, including for riding on ice and snow.

FWIW, axman, I've heard "stories" of bar mitt users having trouble with wind pushing the mitts against the controls, causing things like dragging front brakes and other apocalyptic scenarios.  But I think guys on the forum who have used them report no issues.  Just something to be on the lookout for?


Richard230

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,140
  • Karma: 0
Reply #4 on: November 11, 2019, 02:11:01 pm
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Bilgemaster

  • Just some guy
  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,535
  • Karma: 0
  • 2005 Bullet 500ES in "Mean Green" Military Trim
Reply #5 on: November 11, 2019, 11:37:42 pm
How about a summer accessory.    ::)   https://electricmotorcycles.news/motosola-develops-solar-canopies-for-light-electric-vehicles/

Sure! I could always use more adorable Chinese gals whizzing around on solar-canopied electric scooters any time of year! Bring 'em on!


And for chilly newcomers to the Forum, or those who want a refresher tour of the winter gear others here like, check out last year's Year of the Polar Vortex "Winter" Thread.

Just a little update on one of the items I had discussed: Those battery-powered ultra-cheapo WarmSpace Battery Heated Gloves I'd linked to on eBay are currently found here for as little as $20.76 if you buy three. I used mine yesterday to get to that Bikes & Breakfast thing in Clifton, Virginia. It was in the high 30s when I set off, and my mitts were toasty warm the whole way. Admittedly, they're not the sturdiest or safest motorcycle gloves, but they do get the job done for a couple-few hours through the "moderate chillies" and are easily rechargeable with my onboard Dual USB Charger/12 Volt Ciggy Lighter Outlet doodad for under $5 that I can unreservedly recommend. Mine's on the frame rail under my sprung saddle. Turns out that WarmSpace brand makes a whole line of heated gear, including knee pads, body belts, insoles and balaclavas.



« Last Edit: November 11, 2019, 11:52:12 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.


axman88

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Karma: 0
  • Vintage Motorcycle Fan
Reply #6 on: November 15, 2019, 04:59:50 pm
Enough snow melted off by today to let me ride to work this morning and test out my windshield and lower covers.  It was 26 deg F and overcast when I set out.  The windshield did a nice job of breaking up the wind.  My torso felt quite adequately warm.  The lower covers did a decent job of keeping the wind off my lower legs and feet. 

My knees, up next to the tank, still suffered.  I wonder if anyone has tried making something like a kayak skirt, fastened around one's waist and clipping to the engine guard, a shield from the direct wind blast and holding in some of that warm air from the engine?  If I use some plaid polyester, I can claim it's a kilt.

I didn't lace on the handlebar muffs, choosing instead to try out a pair of thinsulate-lined motorcycle gloves I bought for $17 via Ebay.  I shouldn't have believed the claim that they were cowhide, they feel more like goat or lambskin.  They were not impressively warm, my thick cowhide army surplus trigger finger mitts with the wool liners are warmer, as are ski gloves.  I'll try the handlebar mitts with thinner gloves next.  Also have a pair of silk glove liners en route, which might be a winner.  I'm resisting the idea of electrical clothing, but I might "knuckle under".

How does your bike like the extra wind resistance?

I noticed no difference in handling up to around 55, which is about as fast as I can manage on the city streets during rush hour.


mattsz

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,518
  • Karma: 0
  • moto-gurdyist
Reply #7 on: November 16, 2019, 10:02:39 am
And for chilly newcomers to the Forum, or those who want a refresher tour of the winter gear others here like, check out last year's Year of the Polar Vortex "Winter" Thread.

Wow, that thread did ramble on, didn't it?

Quote
Just a little update on one of the items I had discussed: Those battery-powered ultra-cheapo WarmSpace Battery Heated Gloves I'd linked to on eBay are currently found here for as little as $20.76 if you buy three.

For those truly internet challenged, here's the correct link to Bilgemaster's heated gloves...

https://www.ebay.com/itm/4000MAh-Winter-Warmer-Electric-Heated-Motorcycle-Gloves-Battery-Rechargeable/193183714263?hash=item2cfaa58bd7:g:yj8AAOSwmnFduX4g

I'm reminded of my concerns about how protective they'd be in a crash... how about this?  As long as you can get those gloves in a size large enough to fit what would probably be a somewhat thick glove "liner" inside, add a pair of these to the mix:

https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop/tools/apparel-and-safety-gear/gloves/72972-cut-resistant-gloves



100% knit DuPont KevlarTM fiber!  Cinch those ski-gloves tight enough around the wrist to hold these puppies on as well, and drag your hands down the highway to your heart's content!  You probably won't be able to feel any controls at all through all the layers, but you know without looking which button beeps your horn, don't you?


9fingers

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
  • Karma: 0
  • From the New Hampshire part of New Jersey
Reply #8 on: November 17, 2019, 02:19:51 pm
"My knees, up next to the tank, still suffered." I would try a pair of thick wool hiking socks, with the foot section cut off......just pull them all the way up and over your knees.
9fingers
Currently own:
2016 Classic Chrome Maroon
V Strom 650 ABS Adventure
Beta Rev 3 270
Honda TLR200 custom
Honda TL 250 TMI custom frame
Honda TL 125
Yamaha TY350


9fingers

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 619
  • Karma: 0
  • From the New Hampshire part of New Jersey
Reply #9 on: November 17, 2019, 02:35:23 pm
You guys inspired me and I just ordered a pair of these. Couple bucks more but I wanted black and the non slip palm seemed like a good idea as well.
Anything below 45F and I will most likely ride my V Strom as it has a good sized aftermarket windscreen......the stock one TOTALLY sucks, and the engine gives off enough heat to keep the legs a bit warmer, though it is annoying in summer. Getting closer to selling it for an Interceptor or Conti GT. Will report back on the gloves.
9fingers

https://www.ebay.com/itm/163910447764
Currently own:
2016 Classic Chrome Maroon
V Strom 650 ABS Adventure
Beta Rev 3 270
Honda TLR200 custom
Honda TL 250 TMI custom frame
Honda TL 125
Yamaha TY350


axman88

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Karma: 0
  • Vintage Motorcycle Fan
Reply #10 on: November 17, 2019, 09:44:35 pm
Having large hands, I'm leery of anything that doesn't have size listed.  If it's one size fits all, it won't fit me.  Maybe Matt's suggestion of wearing boots on my hands isn't such a bad idea.

My commute is so short, just 20 minutes, that I would much rather put stuff on the bike, and not on myself several times a day.   There's also the aspect of image, I occupy a fairly respectable position, and prefer to give the impression that everything is under control.  Showing up already in my work attire vs. "a costume" is a plus, since there's often an impromptu meeting with management waiting for me when I stroll in. 


Desi Bike

  • Grand Gearhead
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,164
  • Karma: 2
Reply #11 on: November 18, 2019, 11:18:05 pm
You mentioned that it runs like crap for the first few minutes. May i suggest using a hotter spark plug.
میں نہیں چاہتا کہ ایک اچار
میں صرف اپنی موٹر سائیکل پر سوار کرنا چاہتے ہیں


axman88

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Karma: 0
  • Vintage Motorcycle Fan
Reply #12 on: November 19, 2019, 08:52:39 am
May i suggest using a hotter spark plug.

Yeah, I'm going to get my hands on a Champion RN12YC instead of the NGK BPR6ES I've been using, which has been fine down to about freezing, but isn't cutting it in the real cold.  I did an online purchase of a BPR5ES and a BPR7ES when I bought the bike, to do a little experimenting, but unfortunately when they arrived they were the dreaded -11 versions, with the non-removable nipple.


Haggis

  • Bulleteer
  • ***
  • Posts: 190
  • Karma: 0
Reply #13 on: November 19, 2019, 01:02:52 pm
The -11 is the plug gap, nothing to do with a removable terminal cap or not.
Easy enough to swap plug caps if you have bought plugs with a fixed terminal.
Off route, recalculate?


axman88

  • Grease Monkey
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
  • Karma: 0
  • Vintage Motorcycle Fan
Reply #14 on: November 19, 2019, 03:32:44 pm
The -11 is the plug gap, nothing to do with a removable terminal cap or not.
Easy enough to swap plug caps if you have bought plugs with a fixed terminal.

Easy to switch caps when you have a different cap available.  I struck out at three places when I went looking for a replacement when my OEM cap went bad, and was so glad to finally find one so I bought three.  I have a lifetime supply and they are all for the threaded stud. I'd rather throw away a $2 plug than a $6 plug cap.  I'm not crazy about threading and unthreading that coarse threaded prong into the high tension lead every time I change plugs either.  It's molded onto the coil at the other end, and you can only shorten it so many times. 

So, if -11 means gap, and I see it does, ... and thanks for telling me, ... there seems to be no way to know, via the part number, if one is buying a plug with threaded post / removable nipple, or fixed nipple plugs?