Author Topic: Himalayan compass  (Read 2611 times)

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snailracer

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Reply #15 on: November 22, 2019, 01:48:13 AM
I know I'm a little late to this thread, but according to the owner's manual, you have to do a couple of figure 8"s to re-orientate the compass.


GSS

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Reply #16 on: November 23, 2019, 09:11:45 PM
You are correct. It will start flashing a symbol when it gets further out of sync, and after a figure 8 mine got reasonably well oriented and the symbol disappeared.
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Bilgemaster

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Reply #17 on: November 24, 2019, 01:48:47 AM
I don't have a Himi, but I do have a couple of those Timex Expedition watches with compass, tide clock and temperature functions, one black and one silver. They can be super useful for sailing, especially that tide clock. It makes launching and landing at the ramp just that much easier. Although both my sailboats have cockpit compasses either on a binnacle or mounted next to the companionway hatch, I'll sometimes tap the Timex compass just to get that simple northward needle. Mostly I sail on the Potomac, just randomly zig-zagging about. The river flows more or less north to south, but is wide enough that after a bit I may not recall which way I'm headed. In fact, sometimes I'll strike sail and just drift along with a book. A turning tide means it's maybe best to head back, and "more or less north" will do. I won't set off for a daysail without one of those Timexes on my wrist. For just a hundred bucks and change, I'd say it's one of the best little tools you can have on board. I'm led to understand that its compass, barring ambient magnetic fields, is accurate to within about 5 to 10 degrees, compared to 45 for the Himi's compass. Also, the Timex can be adjusted for local variation in the magnetic field. Still, plus or minus 45 should be good enough to get one headed in the right "general" direction at some crossroad. It certainly would have been sufficiently accurate the last time I actually used my Timex's compass for navigation while driving. Out in the middle of a maze of rural Indiana farm roads somewhere west of the Ohio line coming back from a huge scooter rally my phone's GPS maps acquisition signal decided to take a little holiday. But breaking out some ancient Rand McNally Road Atlas from like the Clinton Administration I was still able to find my way back to Celina, Ohio, where I was staying. Frankly, even just a general notion of "roughly eastward" would have also served me well enough under the circumstances.

So yeah, if I had a Himi with a compass, even a vague one, I'd be pretty happy with that. It might well be "just good enough". But if you feel you need something with a little snappier performance for real off-the-beaten-track or orienteering hijinx, then here is a report that might interest you from the world of hiking and camping gear: 8 Best Compass Watches in 2019. Sure, the Timex is described, but maybe knowing the tides ain't so important to you, and you'd rather have a barometer to keep an eye on that weather, or maybe an altimeter for mountain travels. You'll likely find something there to suit your needs.

Of course, you can use any  analog watch as a compass on a reasonably sunny day. Here's how to do it in both the northern AND southern hemispheres. Daylight savings time in summer can bugger up the simplicity of it all a wee bit, but relax and just just subtract an hour there, Magellan!
« Last Edit: November 24, 2019, 03:07:36 AM by Bilgemaster »
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mattsz

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Reply #18 on: November 24, 2019, 01:09:01 PM
I don't have a Himi, but I do have a couple of those Timex Expedition watches with compass, tide clock and temperature functions...

I'd have one of those in a heartbeat - if  it was offered as a kind of fob watch rather than a wristwatch, which I hate wearing.

My mother's late-model Honda CRV has an electronic dashboard compass that's always on - it flashes when it's trying to calibrate, which is very irritating, as it's not very good at calibrating!  Even though it always seems to be displaying the correct data, the display flashes for about an hour - every  time she starts the car...


Richard230

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Reply #19 on: November 24, 2019, 01:42:40 PM
What is wrong with a magnetic compass?  I had one that I brought from Aerostitch years ago mounted on the handlebar of my Triumph and it seemed to work OK.  Personally, I don't get those electronic compasses like the Himalayan has.  It seems like a gimmick to me and I can't recall anyone who owned a Himalayan that ever said that the thing worked very well. If you really need to know which way is north, just buy a magnetic compass and stick it on to the face of the Himalayan's compass.   ;)

Does the sun still rise in the east and set in the west?   ::)
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Bilgemaster

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Reply #20 on: November 24, 2019, 04:31:55 PM
I'd have one of those in a heartbeat - if  it was offered as a kind of fob watch rather than a wristwatch, which I hate wearing.

[...snip!]


Actually, with its sturdy screw-type band fasteners shown in the attached photo (instead of just flimsy spring-loaded pins), one of those silver Timex Expeditions might lend itself particularly well for use as a pocket watch with an Edwardian leather fob similar to the bespoke and foppish fob with sterling silver bits described here and shown in use just below. Surely eBay should provide an embarrassment of alternatives that won't cost more than the watch itself.



A few careful minutes with a grinder, dremel tool and a bit of polish should take care of the redundant wristband mount at 6 O'Clock.

As for pocket watches, I like 'em fine, and eBay again offers what seems like a near infinite variety of garish "steampunk" designs. Just for a gag I grabbed a particularly garish one with a silvery chain fob for what was less than the cost of a six pack of Guinness to bling out my Belstaff waxed cotton jacket, as shown in the attached photos. Remarkably, it actually keeps decent time and is still hanging in there some years later. Being mechanical I'll never need to find a battery for it, and I do enjoy watching its works swinging merrily through its little window. Analog can  be inspiring.
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mattsz

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Reply #21 on: November 24, 2019, 09:07:56 PM
Well, I was thinking more of something like this...



But if your idea is good enough for Jeeves and Wooster, it should be good enough for me!


Bilgemaster

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Reply #22 on: November 25, 2019, 01:53:03 AM
Well, I was thinking more of something like this...



But if your idea is good enough for Jeeves and Wooster, it should be good enough for me!


Well, great minds, similar circles, and all that. Have a gander at the attached photo of the keychain fob of my ancient RV's keys. I think I may have picked it up back in the early 2000s in the 'Notions and Knicknacks' aisle of a Ross store while half-watching my wife rifle singlemindedly through the clothing racks. Sadly, the watch decided to part company with the rest of the assembly years ago, but its silly little inset compass is still there! I should, however, point out that in that photo it is pointing in almost exactly the opposite direction to where North actually is. If tapped or sort of rocked it'll eventually wheel around the right way...sort of. I offer it here merely as a demonstration of concept that the "something like this"  you were thinking of might just be found with a compass too--though preferably not one quite as craptastic as mine.
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mattsz

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Reply #23 on: November 25, 2019, 11:44:57 AM
Well, great minds, similar circles, and all that. Have a gander at the attached photo of the keychain fob of my ancient RV's keys. I think I may have picked it up back in the early 2000s in the 'Notions and Knicknacks' aisle of a Ross store while half-watching my wife rifle singlemindedly through the clothing racks. Sadly, the watch decided to part company with the rest of the assembly years ago, but its silly little inset compass is still there! I should, however, point out that in that photo it is pointing in almost exactly the opposite direction to where North actually is. If tapped or sort of rocked it'll eventually wheel around the right way...sort of. I offer it here merely as a demonstration of concept that the "something like this"  you were thinking of might just be found with a compass too--though preferably not one quite as craptastic as mine.

The little plastic compass on that now-watchless clip seems to be ubiquitous - they're on flashlights, watch bands, every "survival" gimmick... even my wife's walking poles, with one embedded in the top of each hand grip.  Naturally, they each indicate magnetic North in entirely different directions.  They often seem random enough that any one could be used for a fun-filled cartographic version of spin the bottle.  Reminds me of checking out cheap outdoor dial thermometers in the hardware store or home center - there's a shocking range of temperatures right there on one rack!  I guess it's best to check them all and just choose whichever one is displaying the temperature closest to the average reading.

And this puts me in mind of my early 1980's 2-door Mitsubishi "Montero" SUV (they called it a "Pajaro" in many non-USA markets), which had a cool(!) airplane-inspired inclinometer on the dash.  It included a little disclaimer tag stuck right to it: "Warning on Inclinometer: Accurate only when completely stopped."  Always got a kick out of that one... "Hmm, is this incline steep enough to roll my car over? I don't know, better stop and check the inclinometer!"