Author Topic: Ace GT Head Project  (Read 136318 times)

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JerryGT

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Reply #660 on: January 19, 2020, 11:01:12 am
Thank you all for your Thoughts and Replies.

Yes, the "ticking" could be heard louder after the installation and I think that's normal because of the higher forces in the valve train. But it didn't get louder or changed in any other way over time.
It was absolutely inconspicuous during the season, the engine ran great, I figured it out because when the oil was due to be replaced, the magnets and the old oil was full of tiny shavings.
So I removed the right engine cover and everything still looked great.
The cam wheels had sufficient play, but the bearings of the cam wheels and the inner ring of the "Carberry vibration reduction plate" showed excessive wear.

You know, I usually drive on small roads in remote mountain regions, not looking for top speed, but I love the agility of this narrow and light motorcycle and I like to drive the engine at high revs, between 4-6000 rpm with a secondary gear ratio of 17/38, this configuration with the performance kit fits perfect to my riding style here in the mountains.

Anyway, I will replace the defective parts now and have a look what it shows after another 2000 miles.


Regards,

Jerry
Teaching a pig how to fly is counterproductive and most of the time it results in a pissed-off pig.

Continental GT 535


jez

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Reply #661 on: January 20, 2020, 09:05:02 am
If the bearings had worn surely the meshed gears couldn't be tight. However with new bearings and without adjustment of the eccentric spindles they could be. I've heard of the whole engine being seized and destroyed due to mechanics getting this wrong.
It's not something you generally have to do on pushrod singles, but the unit engine has the timing gears cut into the crank itself, not as as normal  a larger timing gear with more meshing teeth slotted over the crank.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2020, 09:10:06 am by jez »


gashousegorilla

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Reply #662 on: January 20, 2020, 09:06:36 pm
Thank you all for your Thoughts and Replies.

Yes, the "ticking" could be heard louder after the installation and I think that's normal because of the higher forces in the valve train. But it didn't get louder or changed in any other way over time.
It was absolutely inconspicuous during the season, the engine ran great, I figured it out because when the oil was due to be replaced, the magnets and the old oil was full of tiny shavings.
So I removed the right engine cover and everything still looked great.
The cam wheels had sufficient play, but the bearings of the cam wheels and the inner ring of the "Carberry vibration reduction plate" showed excessive wear.

You know, I usually drive on small roads in remote mountain regions, not looking for top speed, but I love the agility of this narrow and light motorcycle and I like to drive the engine at high revs, between 4-6000 rpm with a secondary gear ratio of 17/38, this configuration with the performance kit fits perfect to my riding style here in the mountains.

Anyway, I will replace the defective parts now and have a look what it shows after another 2000 miles.


Regards,

Jerry

   Just MY own personal observations....

  If you noticed on those Cams you installed... there is an extra layer of case Harding applied to them.  Over the already VERY hard stock gear teeth.   I believe those cams  are regrinds , which is fine .  And if they are, they certainly do not need any extra layers of case hardening. Particularly on the gear teeth. .    A champagne colored  Nitriding I believe it is.  This takes up extra mils of space between the gear teeth, and makes them fit  and mesh together tighter then the stocks ones I have found.  So it becomes a bit more difficult to fit the gears together with the proper gear lash... they fit TIGHT.   And this creates more noise.  And add to that a bush that does not hold as much oil as the stock ones do... and it adds to the noise.

  As far as the anti vibration plate goes.   I would  not use it with any kind of performance mod.     The bearing in there .... the one I had at least... WAS only rated up to 4000 rpm's.  And the custom made inner race for it, had a  hardening  treatment put on it that wore through .  Quickly !   I heard bearing whine at around a thousand miles , and got rid of the thing.  It may be OK for a stock bike at lower rpm's, and puttering around ?   And I think that is what it was designed for.   But if your going to rev it ?  I wouldn't .. personally !... use it.
An thaibhsí atá rattling ag an doras agus tá sé an diabhal sa chathaoir.


JerryGT

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Reply #663 on: January 21, 2020, 09:39:21 am
If you noticed on those Cams you installed... there is an extra layer of case Harding applied to them.......This takes up extra mils of space between the gear teeth, and makes them fit  and mesh together tighter then the stocks ones I have found.  So it becomes a bit more difficult to fit the gears together with the proper gear lash... they fit TIGHT.   And this creates more noise.  And add to that a bush that does not hold as much oil as the stock ones do... and it adds to the noise.
That does make sense to me.
The noise, I talked about wasn`t a whine, more that "ticking" an "chirping" of the gears backlash and from the push rods, the rockers and their tolerances. Just louder than stock.

 
Quote
As far as the anti vibration plate goes.   I would  not use it with any kind of performance mod.     The bearing in there .... the one I had at least... WAS only rated up to 4000 rpm's.  And the custom made inner race for it, had a  hardening  treatment put on it that wore through .  Quickly !   I heard bearing whine at around a thousand miles , and got rid of the thing.  It may be OK for a stock bike at lower rpm's, and puttering around ?   And I think that is what it was designed for.   But if your going to rev it ?  I wouldn't .. personally !... use it.

Absolutely right.
When I saw that the thin hardened layer had chipped off, it was clear to me that it would not be replaced.


Greets,

Jerry
Teaching a pig how to fly is counterproductive and most of the time it results in a pissed-off pig.

Continental GT 535


Guaire

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Reply #664 on: February 28, 2020, 06:19:57 pm
Cams are installed.
  I need to wire in the second DynaTek coil. The Fireball head is a twin spark.
  While switching to 520 sprockets and chain, I pulled the rear wheel and disengaged the rear brake line from the caliper. Gotta do a brake fluid change.
  I'm going to change the sprag gear as well.
  The right side crankcase cover is back on. I did some grinding on the oil filler screw in filter. The stator wires are in the way.
  The two wire sets, one is the stator are very difficult to unplug and plug. To unplug them, I disconnected the rear/left motor mount plate. Looks like I'll stick to that. I don't want to add wire length and extra connectors, especially to the stator output wires. It's too easy to lose or melt a connection with that power. I know it sounds silly to talk about output from our little stators!
Cheers,
Bill G.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2020, 06:31:24 pm by Guaire »
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