Recent Posts

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Campfire Talk / Re: classic barn find
« Last Post by AzCal Retred on Today at 11:09:26 am »
@ # 23: " all our government employees pay income tax "
That's so cute...you really aren't paying attention, are you? Whilst we all are supposed to pay our "fair share", having a large income can buy you dispensation via tax lawyers. I've never had a tax lawyer myself, I just paid what was deemed fair. Apparently "45", the self described billionaire, feels no such obligation. He believes it's all good to have others carry your water.

I like the "dollars left over" income analysis. Assume it takes $5,000 yearly to keep a person reasonably fed. Another $2000 or so for clothes. Maybe $6,000 a year for a safe place to sleep. A baseline of maybe $15,000 keeps you in clothes, food & shelter, no medical or savings. I grew up with folks raising 3-5 kids on a $7000 yearly income, so it's doable. Unpleasant, but doable.

For a single person making $12 - $15 hourly, working regularly, their yearly after tax income is maybe $20K - $25K. That leaves maybe $5K - $10K surplus, or "discretionary" income, for medical, magazines, transportation, etc.

For a single person making "real" money, say $50 - $100 per hour, Yearly after tax becomes $75K - $150K. The baseline expense is probably higher, maybe $20K. That guy would have maybe $55K to $130K "discretionary" income for fun stuff like health insurance, car payments, maybe some toys, etc.

Now look at a guy pulling down $250K yearly. Still takes only about $25K for his basics, and his yearly after tax would be around $175K. The discretionary portion becomes about $150K.

All these guys are folks you might work with. Let's look at Management level numbers.

A corporate manager can make $1,000K. If he paid full tax, which he wouldn't, take home is around $700,000. It takes the same $25K to feed, house & clothe this guy. Often there are perks like free company cars, housing, etc. Even with nothing extra, this manager's discretionary portion goes to $675K. And there's no shortage of corporate folks making $10M - $20M yearly.
 
The guy with $675K in yearly discretionary money can afford a higher tax rate than the idiot setting there at $12 per hour, there's just more slack. And for truly stratospheric incomes, the numbers get even more extreme. Tax rates for the cognoscenti in the 1950's were higher than today and there was still no shortage of millionaires. None of the top 1% ever missed a meal at a 40% - 45% tax rate, and we had roads & bridges that weren't 3rd world.

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650 Twin - Interceptor/GT / Re: Notchy Clutch Cable
« Last Post by BC AVIATION on Today at 10:39:51 am »
Uh...It IS the Royal Enfield Forum!  What would you expect!

I'm sure you could find a Triumph forum somewhere.


Cookie






Jesus christ, all of you need to get a grip. Every single forum post here descends into petty arguments and people justifying why they bought the RE over a triumph....
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Campfire Talk / Re: Thai Thruxton
« Last Post by AzCal Retred on Today at 09:54:38 am »
I guess I'm missing the part where we actually use the terrific performance of these fabulous machines at great speed ( < 120 MPH/ 200 KPH ) for awhile and don't just use them as something to polish up or run out for a loaf of bread on. Are we saving money putting $60 tyres on our bargain Panigale's? No. Running the chains until they lift 5mm up off the sprocket teeth? Again No. Forces applied to the motorcycle at 120+ are at least 4x those at 60. Things that don't much matter at 60 can rapidly become very exciting at double that. A 110 HP machine is a tire & chain eater if you actually use it. If not...?

There are a lot of 150 MPH 600 class machines with mind-numbing HP figures from only about 36 Cubic Inches of squish. For the most part they are predictably high revving ( 12,000 - 14,000 RPM ) to coax GP HP levels out of a coffee mug sized displacement. Good bikes for 25 - 35 year old testosterone infused riders. Eventually they learn that there's always a faster and usually much more expensive bike out there.
https://www.hotcars.com/fastest-600cc-sportbikes-money-can-buy/

I'm with you on the Ducati twin though. The Desert Sled 800cc Scramblers look like a lot of fun with nice, real-world performance numbers. 6-speed, 75 HP, maybe 120 MPH top speed. There is apparently even a 400cc version...? Anyway - they look like they'd make a good ride that you'd enjoy for many years. Keeping your machine constantly "on the cam" to go anywhere gets old.
https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/ducati/ducati_scrambler_desert_sled_17.htm

Your well-sorted 535GT seems to offer everything a reasonable fellow might want. Even 30 HP will stuff you into a bridge abutment at 95 or so if you're careless or unlucky, but a lighter, good handling machine seems a safer overall platform to me. The great midrange makes a days ride pleasant, not an exercise in rowing the shifter corner to corner.
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Tech Tips / Re: Classic 500 Ecu short
« Last Post by Freddy1 on Today at 09:05:07 am »
Unfortunately it is possible ECU in short circuit.
Try to disconnect ECU, if the fuse doesn't burn surely ECU is KO.
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650 Twin - Interceptor/GT / Re: Notchy Clutch Cable
« Last Post by chunkybutt on Today at 08:25:56 am »
Jesus christ, all of you need to get a grip. Every single forum post here descends into petty arguments and people justifying why they bought the RE over a triumph....
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650 Twin - Interceptor/GT / Re: LED Headlights for RE650
« Last Post by Mav on Today at 07:34:41 am »
Just a warning to UK riders.

Conversion LED bulbs in standard headlamps will fail their MOT.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/mot-inspection-manual-for-motorcycles/4-lamps-reflectors-and-electrical-equipment


So it will be a case of having to fit the standard bulb for the test.  ;)
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I love that village!!  Looks like the island of Sumba a little.

Also love your wife tickling the whale's chin!

Here's a few pics from our Friday day ride to Moeraki  - small fishing village and Maori pa site (and whaling station in 1830s)  90km north of Dunedin. Very pleasant ride; 25C, light winds and hardly any traffic. Crayfish & chips, a couple of ales and a nap on the grass...
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650 Twin - Interceptor/GT / Re: Out and about on your INT/GT: 2021 Edition
« Last Post by Hoiho on Today at 04:54:08 am »
Here's a few pics from our Friday day ride to Moeraki  - small fishing village and Maori pa site (and whaling station in 1830s)  90km north of Dunedin. Very pleasant ride; 25C, light winds and hardly any traffic. Crayfish & chips, a couple of ales and a nap on the grass...
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Anyone else get out and about this weekend?
Yeah, I took the RE over hills and through the woods on Saturday (yesterday). I was going to see a friend who has a small shop / home shop for machining. He is providing adult supervision on a project I'm doing. The long way there crosses a couple of ridge lines and two narrow valleys. This was the first time I had been on this route since the fries in September. One of the things it took a while to notice is that most of the steel arnco guard rails are sitting on the ground along the roads. All the wooden posts have burned up. The asphalt is impregnated with dirt from the run off. On the sunny dry sections you leave a dust trail and in the shadows you do the squirm. Heartbreaking to see the houses that are now reduced to just the chimney.
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650 Twin - Interceptor/GT / Re: Dan Dan The Fireman
« Last Post by agagliardi on Today at 03:54:21 am »
Lets face it, motorcycling is one of the most exciting things you will ever do, and maybe one of the more dangerous. I have had three accidents in my 47+ years of riding. Two of which were clearly my error, misjudgment, AND daydreaming. One was my, and another idiot's simultaneous error.

Youth and motorcycling often does not mix. I doubt any of you can look back and not say, by the grace of God go I! We are both logical and emotional creatures, and easily succumb to the thrill of speed aggression.  I admit that I often ride too aggressively, especially on my Hayabusa.

There is no doubt that a more stringent system of licensing is necessary. And I agree with the idea of limiting the type of bike/HP  until a rider has had a few years riding time. We all  dislike regulations and governmental control, but in these times of congestion, wild west driving, cell phones, drug use, and generally negative human evolution, more regulation/education/and enforcement would save lives. It makes sense to at least try to protect inexperience riders from killing themselves or others. The US is clearly lacking.

We hope that when we get on that bike, we remember we are riding a motorcycle, pause for a moment, and pledge 100% focus. All that skill means nothing if your mind wanders.  I would consider practicing focus equally as important as skill at our stage in life/motorcycling.

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