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Continental GT Cafe Racer / Classic Bikes of Maryland
« Last post by Guaire on Today at 10:13:47 am »
Got there on my GT, the fairgrounds of Mt Airy, MD. Jeremy and Matt of Cycles of Silver Spring rode out a 535 GT and the twins.
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Continental GT Cafe Racer / Re: 1964 Royal Enfield Crusader test
« Last post by Richard230 on Today at 08:04:44 am »
The British RE machines performed much better than their lethargic, Indian counterparts. Bob Currie, who was no slip of a lad, got 88 mph from a 500 Redditch Bullet and suggested it might do more with the air filter removed and jetted up. Road tests back then were done with timing equipment over a measured distance, indeed, speedometer inaccuracies would also be given in the specs with such road tests. I don't know about 88 mph for a 350, though, but I have seen tests where the high seventies were recorded.
 B.W.

I have a British road test by the "Blue 'Un" (whatever that is) from their April 1959 issue where they tested a 350 Bullet and obtained a one-way top speed of 88 mph. The subtitle of the test said: "An Exciting, High-performance Mount with Strong Appeal to the Discriminating Sporting Rider". However that bike might have been a "ringer".   ;) The top speed average was 81 mph and the quarter mile was covered in 19 seconds at 68 mph. The conditions were stated as: "light following wind; rider wearing two-piece riding suit and overboots".  ::)

(I posted a photo of the road test in the vintage forum a couple of years ago, if I recall correctly.)
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Speedo inaccuracy, and/or tailwind.

The best advantage that they had back then was a decent flowing exhaust system and proper jetting. That is a good advantage, but it doesn't bridge the gap between a 250cc and a 500cc from the same maker.
The British RE machines performed much better than their lethargic, Indian counterparts. Bob Currie, who was no slip of a lad, got 88 mph from a 500 Redditch Bullet and suggested it might do more with the air filter removed and jetted up. Road tests back then were done with timing equipment over a measured distance, indeed, speedometer inaccuracies would also be given in the specs with such road tests. I don't know about 88 mph for a 350, though, but I have seen tests where the high seventies were recorded.
 B.W.
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Continental GT Cafe Racer / Re: Primary drive - the Great Escape
« Last post by gavinfdavies on Today at 02:27:14 am »
Hi Gavin, I appreciate that this happened a few years back, but I've had exactly the same thing happen to my bike. Can I ask when they replaced the engine under warranty, did they say anything about the air filter mod you've done to your bike? I've done something similar and removed the air box replacing it with a cone filter so I just wondered whether they mentioned it at all? Also did you have to take the bike to an approved RE service centre or could you choose where you had the work done?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Sorry for the VERY late reply. Don't come on here often. Haven't touched the bike in a year or two. I took mine to an independent but approved RE dealer in Taunton. Most RE dealers are owned by the importer, and hence have a vested interest in not paying out. My independent RE dealer (key point being that he's approved) didn't mind the mods, as it wasn't his money! :-) Hope it all got sorted. They should fix it anyway, as there is no way an airbox mod would make a primary chain snap!
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Bullet Iron Barrel / Re: Where do you buy parts?
« Last post by Grant Borden on Yesterday at 09:37:05 pm »
If you ask they will ship a slower method for less money.

Grant
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Bullet Iron Barrel / Re: Bullet 500 Help Needed
« Last post by ace.cafe on Yesterday at 09:33:24 pm »
Thanks so much for the great responses.

This is what I suspected.

Pretty crappy that a gasket thickness can control a critical tolerance. Adding an additional gasket is a concern because the potential of too much slop.

I didn't realize there were different sizes of shim washers. I just used the ones that were in there since the engine was stock.

I will do some measurements and see what's up. I think I can use a dial indicator to figure out the interference.
When the bikes were made, there were different thicknesses of gaskets, and the engine builder selected what was needed from his parts stock.
After they were no longer being made, aftermarket gasket kits were just made the right general shape, and no real concern about thickness of the timing cover gasket.
When I was coaching people doing Fireball builds, I would always try to get them to carefully remove the timing cover, so as to hopefully not destroy the gasket. The black rubber ones were almost impossible to find.

It is important to remember that this is a design from around the 1930s, and engines were built by "fitters" that hand assembled the parts according to fit of the various parts that were not very precisely manufactured. In India, they just continued to build them in the old ways.
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650 Twin - Interceptor/GT / Re: interceptor 650 handle bar risers
« Last post by Dr Mayhem on Yesterday at 09:25:35 pm »
I couldn't ride a Interceptor with the stock bars, bars way too low in relation to the seat height. Lower the seat or raise the bars is the only way.

I like to sit back from the tank to be relaxed and comfortable riding but it's not possible with those low bars.

I was wondering why all the video I've seen of Interceptors being ridden have the rider jammed up against the tank. Now I know

Damn that must be torture!!
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650 Twin - Interceptor/GT / Re: Continental GT handlebar ?
« Last post by Dr Mayhem on Yesterday at 09:02:48 pm »
So, true. I spent a good hour today measuring the RE twins and a Ducati scrambler.

The Scrambler rims will go on the conti with not too much difficulty.

I'm anticipating an offset trans sprocket to make it all work, but not a problem
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650 Twin - Interceptor/GT / Re: Continental GT handlebar ?
« Last post by Kevin Mahoney on Yesterday at 08:38:03 pm »
I am pleasantly surprised. The bike isn't all that light but good for RE. Great think about Americans is that they can never leave leave anything like it was.
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650 Twin - Interceptor/GT / Re: Continental GT handlebar ?
« Last post by Dr Mayhem on Yesterday at 08:16:05 pm »
I can now confirm that the conti's handlebar risers are indeed aluminum, forged aluminum to be exact  ;D

With my butt slid back against the little step in the seat the pegs and bars are exactly where they should be for me,
like it was a custom made just for me.

Hate the small diameter and texture of the grips though. Couldn't live with them five minutes!





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