Author Topic: Altering the meteor's ergonomics  (Read 433 times)

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gzrfox

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on: June 11, 2024, 10:02:45 am
Hello everyone

So, a small prologue; I've had spinal fusion surgery on my cervical spine and still have multiple herniated discs, which makes riding... well, a little difficult. Moving on...

The meteor's riding position forces every bump on the road to go up my spine and I'm starting to feel the effects. Therefore, since there's been no interest in my for sale ad, I've had an idea.

From what I've seen, most structural parts of the meteor are interchangeable with the classic. Which means I can swap the lower cradle of the classic to my meteor and have the footpegs a touch back, effectively altering the riding position to one where I can use my legs to absorb some of those bumps.

So I'm just trying to verify here. Apart from the footpegs and the rear brake pedal, would I need to change anything else to achieve that?

Many thanks!


SquatosaurusRex

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Reply #1 on: June 11, 2024, 01:47:57 pm
I've actually considered this before. I just couldn't figure out where to source the lower cradle from the classic 350.

You might need the gear shifter linkage too since you're moving the pegs backwards.


MMRanch

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Reply #2 on: June 11, 2024, 04:23:01 pm
gzrfox

Sorry you having that problem  but good for you working on a solution !   :)

Hay , the Hunter here in the USA is only $3500.   Have you check on trading you Meteor ?   It's always nice to have a new bike and the 3 year protection plan that comes with it !   ;)
Your trading in a bike still under the protection plan ... it may be worth more than you think ?   ???
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gzrfox

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Reply #3 on: June 11, 2024, 05:07:12 pm
I've actually considered this before. I just couldn't figure out where to source the lower cradle from the classic 350.

You might need the gear shifter linkage too since you're moving the pegs backwards.

I've found a couple on ebay and I'm fairly certain dealerships can order those for you so it should be fairly easy sourcing the things. Nice thinking on the linkage, didn't even consider it, thought the heel/toe could be a straight swap. I'm also thinking I might need different handlebars but we'll cross that bridge when we get to it.


gzrfox

Sorry you having that problem  but good for you working on a solution !   :)

Hay , the Hunter here in the USA is only $3500.   Have you check on trading you Meteor ?   It's always nice to have a new bike and the 3 year protection plan that comes with it !   ;)
Your trading in a bike still under the protection plan ... it may be worth more than you think ?   ???


Thanks man! A trade in was my first thought, back when the bike only had less than 500km on it but the dealership wanted near two grand on top and I'm not giving these [expletive] another cent of my money! Other dealerships haven't even responded so selling privately seems to be the only way. I've still got the ad up but there has been literally zero interest and I'm not willing to go uber low for a practically new bike!


Pellow1971

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Reply #4 on: June 11, 2024, 05:52:17 pm
Tec Bike parts do some bolt on footpegs that fit the Meteor further back on the frame
 You keep the standard pegs.


Dexter

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Reply #5 on: June 11, 2024, 06:02:12 pm
selling privately seems to be the only way. I've still got the ad up but there has been literally zero interest and I'm not willing to go uber low for a practically new bike!

When you drive a new car off the dealer's lot, you have just lost 30% of the price you paid for it, so I imagine the same would hold true for a new motorcycle. I'm not sure what year your bike is, but that 30% off what you paid should be your starting point and take best offers from that.

If you price it right, someone will buy it. You need to consider how much you will spend on buying all these parts to "rebuild" your bike into the equation too. If you can find a used Classic for sale as well, that would save you the rip off dealer experience and would likely incur less overall loss from your original investment.
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Marti

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Reply #6 on: June 11, 2024, 06:11:05 pm
Have you tried lifting yourself on the Meteor? True, the foot pegs are too much forward to make it comfortable, but is still is possible pulling on the handlebars.  I do it all the time when driving over a speed bump. Or only at the end of the speed bump, because going up isn't so bad, but going down can hurt. When the bike goes down, it is relatively easy to lift oneself up a bit.


OREO

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Reply #7 on: June 11, 2024, 09:27:12 pm
I actually moved the passenger pegs forward about where the classic pegs are.
I was able to make a bracket out of steel strap and mount to the muffler support and on the otherside there is a hole in the frame just about in the same place. Use the pegs/shifter till I get on the open road then have several places to move for comfort.I don't have any photos. Not good with that stuff. I'm lucky I can do this. ::)
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Siamese

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Reply #8 on: June 12, 2024, 01:30:38 am
If ergonomics are critical enough, an adventure or dual purporse bike can't be beat.  The Kawasaki KLX 300 puts you in the correct position.  I don't know how the stock seat is, but Seat Concepts sells a replacement for the cover and foam that goes on the stock pan.  Their seats are always great because they get the sit angle right, and they have great foam.   

Ankles, hips and shoulders all on the same plane is where comfort lives. 


gzrfox

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Reply #9 on: June 12, 2024, 08:14:35 am
Tec Bike parts do some bolt on footpegs that fit the Meteor further back on the frame
 You keep the standard pegs.

I considered those first but I'd like to have the controls available at all times, considering our roads here don't really give you much of a break when it comes to potholes, rough cobblestone, bumps and ruts and everything inbetween! Plus the cradle and the misc. stuff aren't that much more expensive, honestly.


When you drive a new car off the dealer's lot, you have just lost 30% of the price you paid for it, so I imagine the same would hold true for a new motorcycle. I'm not sure what year your bike is, but that 30% off what you paid should be your starting point and take best offers from that.

If you price it right, someone will buy it. You need to consider how much you will spend on buying all these parts to "rebuild" your bike into the equation too. If you can find a used Classic for sale as well, that would save you the rip off dealer experience and would likely incur less overall loss from your original investment.

The 30% is not viable, especially considering the used prices over here which are plain ridiculous. I got it for about 5k euros, selling for 4k. Sure it'd probably go tomorrow if I priced it at 3.5k but considering I've only got it for 3 months, I'd rather keep it and mod it. I'd consider going lower if I could find a used classic but there are none.


Have you tried lifting yourself on the Meteor? True, the foot pegs are too much forward to make it comfortable, but is still is possible pulling on the handlebars.  I do it all the time when driving over a speed bump. Or only at the end of the speed bump, because going up isn't so bad, but going down can hurt. When the bike goes down, it is relatively easy to lift oneself up a bit.

That's what I'm doing at the moment but it's movements like those that make me "lock up" painfully so I'd rather find a better solution.


If ergonomics are critical enough, an adventure or dual purporse bike can't be beat.  The Kawasaki KLX 300 puts you in the correct position.  I don't know how the stock seat is, but Seat Concepts sells a replacement for the cover and foam that goes on the stock pan.  Their seats are always great because they get the sit angle right, and they have great foam.   

Ankles, hips and shoulders all on the same plane is where comfort lives. 

True enough. I bought it without test riding on the assumption that it wouldn't bother me that much but alas, I was proven wrong pretty quickly. We don't get the KLX over here but I was considering bikes like the Himalayan or the CF Moto 450MT but the whole reason I went RE was the fact that I'd been riding dual sports for many years and don't really like them, to be honest. I'd like to be able to look back after I get off and really just ogle the machine! I know you can't have it all but... yeah... The Himalayan seems like a good deal though, quite a supple ride.


longstrokeclassic

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Reply #10 on: June 12, 2024, 10:00:39 am
Try rolling the bars forward so you’re less upright. I have several herniated discs and having to reach for the bars worked for me.
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