Author Topic: classic 500 normal operating temp  (Read 315 times)

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Rad Rich

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on: July 19, 2022, 05:13:05 pm
Hello, I bought one of those little temp gauges that replaces the oil fill knob.  I'm just curious as to if anyone knows what the normal operating temp of a 2017 Classic 500 would be?


Richard230

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Reply #1 on: July 19, 2022, 10:22:07 pm
I used to have an air cooled 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100 and on which I installed a temperature gauge with a dipstick replacing the oil filler cap. The oil temperature would range between 180 degrees F and 230 degrees, depending upon the ambient air temperature and the speed that I was riding at. The higher temperature would be riding at 100 degrees and 80 mph. I guess that was why Triumph recommended using Mobil 1 full-synthetic "Racing Oil". 
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MannP

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Reply #2 on: July 20, 2022, 10:39:32 am
Hello, I bought one of those little temp gauges that replaces the oil fill knob.  I'm just curious as to if anyone knows what the normal operating temp of a 2017 Classic 500 would be?

I have the same on my 2018 C5, it runs at about 80 degrees under normal operating temps. Its only measuring air temperature in the case though as the dipstick doesnt reach all the way to the oil.


Rad Rich

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Reply #3 on: July 20, 2022, 05:56:04 pm
mannp,
You say it runs about 80 degrees under normal operating temp.  What is normal operating temp please?


MannP

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Reply #4 on: July 21, 2022, 09:26:01 am
mannp,
You say it runs about 80 degrees under normal operating temp.  What is normal operating temp please?

Mine gets to about 80 after a 10 minute run at variable speeds and then stays at 80 there regardless how much more i ride


axman88

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Reply #5 on: July 21, 2022, 04:18:18 pm
I can't answer the oil temp. question, but I was looking at head temperatures using a non-contact thermometer, and getting numbers in the high 300s F with the bike just idling.

I was thinking about getting a oil sump thermometer, but they are slow to react, and difficult and rather unsafe to read while riding.  Only a small fraction of oil is circulated into the head and cylinder, where heat related issues are likely to have the most consequence.  I decided that a thermocouple mounted under the spark plug would be a lot more valuable and might allow me to actually react to an emerging problem before something failed.  http://thesensorconnection.com/cht-sensors/cht-sensors/cht-cylinder-head-temperature-12-and-14-mm


dickim

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Reply #6 on: July 26, 2022, 02:19:38 am
Slightly lateral, but when I built a Guzzi engined JZR trike I tapped the sump plug to take an oil temp sender, and a  gauge, worked well👍 pwr to gauge and then down to sender.....
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suitcasejefferson

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Reply #7 on: August 05, 2022, 06:48:07 pm
The best way to cool down a late model air cooled bike is to richen up the air/fuel mixture. Late model bikes are set way too lean. If you have EFI, there should be some kind of electronic tuner for it.
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