Author Topic: Mods when fitting hack  (Read 832 times)

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Hog Head

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on: August 08, 2021, 04:16:41 am
I have been working on a Cozy sidecar for my 650 Interceptor
The sidecar needed a few mods to cure shoddy engineering and craftsmanship.  18" front Interceptor alloy rim, new swingarm with axle, disc brake, Brooklands screen, better mount to the bike, paint and powdercoat......... plus a few important mods to the bike

I installed YSS .9 kg/mm linear rate fork springs, and a cartridge emulator to fix the dive.  Rear shocks are YSS fully adjustable cartridge units fitted with a progressive rate spring suited to my weight.  Still not happy with the Cozy car shock, and working on a solution now that will likely involve yet another swingarm, revised geometry, and a more suitable shock with a progressive rate spring

A 200mm YSS steering damper cured the shakes.  The better solution is to make different yokes or a leading link fork, but needs more test riding.
I may well make new yokes and fit a better front brake at the same time, as wider yokes would allow a 4 pot calliper

I could literally see the forks flex in hard cornering so made a proper fork brace.  The stock "brace" while looking the business is no more than a glorified mudguard, made from cheap cast aluminium with the tensile strength of cheddar cheese. 
I made this brace to fix that problem.  Billet 6061 T-6 aluminium for tensile strength.  Slotted fixing bolts to insure proper fork alignment, and to a lesser degree, addressing any manufacturing tolerance stack up, both of which cause fork stiction.
I made a couple of extras if anyone needs one

All fairly straightforward, but for the sidecar suspension that still is a work in progress
Ducati Supersport S
Harley XR1200
Triumph T-120 Bonnie (Hinkley)
RE 650 Interceptor
Harley XL1200R


Kevin Mahoney

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Reply #1 on: August 22, 2021, 10:58:50 pm
Hog Heads,
I've got a couple of questions if you don't mind. If you bought your sidecar in the US it would have come from me.  The units that I've gotten over the past decade have been brilliant. You would have a 5-year warranty from me and if you have issues please let me know.

My RE 650 mounting kit is a rigid 5 strut arrangement. It is custom designed and manufactured for the 650. Are you having trouble with one of mine? I stand behind everything that I sell so please contact me if you are having trouble.

Although the RE's that I sell today all come with steering dampers, most customers don't use them for the 650. If you are experiencing wobble I would suggest that you fine-tune your alignment. Most sidecars have some sort of low speed wobble but the 650 does not. That's a whole other conversation with many variables depending on the bike

Does your car not have suspension or are you just wanting to modify it?

The alloy wheel is something that I'd like to sell.  I have seen too many Indian alloy wheels fail with disastrous results. I would be OK with wheels made by RE but until RE brings them to the US I won't sell them. When they make a wheel for their US bikes they will have to be DOT approved and only then will I sell them.

Best Regards,
Kevin Mahoney
www.cyclesidecar.com


Hog Head

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Reply #2 on: August 23, 2021, 04:23:48 am
Hog Heads,
I've got a couple of questions if you don't mind. If you bought your sidecar in the US it would have come from me.  The units that I've gotten over the past decade have been brilliant. You would have a 5-year warranty from me and if you have issues please let me know.

My RE 650 mounting kit is a rigid 5 strut arrangement. It is custom designed and manufactured for the 650. Are you having trouble with one of mine? I stand behind everything that I sell so please contact me if you are having trouble.

Although the RE's that I sell today all come with steering dampers, most customers don't use them for the 650. If you are experiencing wobble I would suggest that you fine-tune your alignment. Most sidecars have some sort of low speed wobble but the 650 does not. That's a whole other conversation with many variables depending on the bike

Does your car not have suspension or are you just wanting to modify it?

The alloy wheel is something that I'd like to sell.  I have seen too many Indian alloy wheels fail with disastrous results. I would be OK with wheels made by RE but until RE brings them to the US I won't sell them. When they make a wheel for their US bikes they will have to be DOT approved and only then will I sell them.

No I am in Thailand and this sidecar was imported about 8 years ago directly from Cozy India, and I presume a domestic market version.  I bought it used, as no sidecars available here other than local fiberglass copies of a copy, and not the sort of craftsmanship that I would be happy with. 
Nothing to do with your company, and possibly not the same US approved version as you import.

I did not like the 19" wheel as supplied, and as  RE 17" wheel conversions are popular here, I bought a low km, stock 18 x 2.5 alloy front Interceptor rim; and using stainless spokes, laced it to a Honda hub, with disc brake.  This necessitated changing the front mount to retain the stock mudguard.  I am still tempted to cut off that inordinately heavy rear guard mount and design something more aesthetically pleasing to my eye.

I hear what you are saying about the alignment, and this needs a bit more work, requiring more experience with sidecar mounting than I can provide.  Buying a proven mount is very expensive to import given the weight, Covid freight rates, and about 50% import costs.  I have no alternative but to figure it out for myself.

Now that I have the 200 USD YSS unit, I will keep it mounted as a bit of high tech bling, as even low speed shakes give me the shakes.

The sidecar suspension is still a work in progress.  I changed the swingarm pivot to a bearing design, a new stub axle design, and cut a new swingarm from a single 10mm plate.  I used the same swingarm geometry and shock mounting arrangement, and in retrospect could have done it a bit differently.  I am now pondering the shock mount, spring rate, and damping. 

BTW, it was me that emailed you last week about a replacement shock, and the spring rate.

Ducati Supersport S
Harley XR1200
Triumph T-120 Bonnie (Hinkley)
RE 650 Interceptor
Harley XL1200R


Kevin Mahoney

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Reply #3 on: August 23, 2021, 04:11:17 pm
It all makes sense now. You're one of those guys that can't leave well enough alone!! I applaud you for digging into this so deeply. Sorry that I couldn't answer your question about spring rate. It was a good question
Best Regards,
Kevin Mahoney
www.cyclesidecar.com


Hog Head

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Reply #4 on: August 23, 2021, 04:25:05 pm
It all makes sense now. You're one of those guys that can't leave well enough alone!! I applaud you for digging into this so deeply. Sorry that I couldn't answer your question about spring rate. It was a good question

It is a disease
Ducati Supersport S
Harley XR1200
Triumph T-120 Bonnie (Hinkley)
RE 650 Interceptor
Harley XL1200R