Author Topic: What’s everyone’s stable like  (Read 494 times)

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Oldleathers

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on: November 28, 2022, 01:35:45 am
So what other types of bikes do we find in your stable then? 
  Myself, I cannot lie, the red one makes me ride as I am a teenager, full of vinegar and on my way to my girlfriends house while her parents aren’t home. 
   The Continental makes me ride like the distinguished, salt and pepper bearded gentleman that I aspire to be. 
   Then there’s  that green one. 
   Ohhhhhh how she makes my knees and Back ache.   


Karl Childers

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Reply #1 on: November 28, 2022, 04:27:20 am
Bikes come and go in my life, so many motorcycles so little time. If I was wealthy I would have kept them all. Beside my Bullet  I have my GSA  and My Softail Slim, The Slim satisfies my weakness for big American V twins of which I've owned a number over the years and the Beemer scratches my dualsport travel itch. [/img]


Richard230

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Reply #2 on: November 28, 2022, 02:47:50 pm
Here are a couple of photos of my bikes in 2016. The yellow 2014 Zero was replaced with a silver 2018 model. Both the yellow Zero and the Triumph Bonneville were given to my daughter who now rides both bikes. A separate photo shows my 2020 KTM 390 Duke. And then we have the mid-1970's Honda Kick-and-Go (and then fall over).  ::)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


gizzo

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Reply #3 on: November 30, 2022, 01:13:58 pm
Here's the current lineup in my shed.
CX500 Cafe racer
RE CGT 535 single
XT225 (hers)
DR250
Ducati Monster (also hers)
Ducati Pantah
The 2 black ones in the corner are his and hers track bikes : his is a drz400sm, hers is a 300 Ninja with gsxr rear shock and sv1000 front brake. It's hilarious. They both are.
PW50 (hers, from 8th Christmas)
Honda SL125 SE (a maybe one day project. The offspring mentioned doing it yesterday so maybe I'll give it to her).

All these bikes work. Except the SL. Obviously.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2022, 01:50:43 pm by gizzo »
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
DR250
DRZ400SM
GSX250E


gizzo

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Reply #4 on: November 30, 2022, 01:51:57 pm
Here are a couple of photos of my bikes in 2016. The yellow 2014 Zero was replaced with a silver 2018 model. Both the yellow Zero and the Triumph Bonneville were given to my daughter who now rides both bikes. A separate photo shows my 2020 KTM 390 Duke. And then we have the mid-1970's Honda Kick-and-Go (and then fall over).  ::)
Kick-and-Go is cool. Haven't seen that before...
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
DR250
DRZ400SM
GSX250E


Richard230

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Reply #5 on: November 30, 2022, 02:34:27 pm
I think the Kick and Go was sold by Honda in the mid-1970's. I bought mine new when I bought a 1977 Honda CB550K for my 7-year old daughter to ride. I was intrigued by its method of propulsion. Honda only sold the scooter for a year or two. It was kind of expensive for what you got and was also somewhat unstable when trying to lean it around corners. It definitely worked best on smooth, level pavement. My guess it was likely withdrawn from the market either by slow sales or after Honda was sued by the first little kid to fall over and hit his head on the pavement. (There were no warning stickers telling you to wear a helmet and knee pads, or any other cautions to take while riding the scooter, other than the maximum rider weight being 130 pounds.)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


gizzo

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Reply #6 on: December 01, 2022, 04:29:23 am
I think the Kick and Go was sold by Honda in the mid-1970's. I bought mine new when I bought a 1977 Honda CB550K for my 7-year old daughter to ride. I was intrigued by its method of propulsion. Honda only sold the scooter for a year or two. It was kind of expensive for what you got and was also somewhat unstable when trying to lean it around corners. It definitely worked best on smooth, level pavement. My guess it was likely withdrawn from the market either by slow sales or after Honda was sued by the first little kid to fall over and hit his head on the pavement. (There were no warning stickers telling you to wear a helmet and knee pads, or any other cautions to take while riding the scooter, other than the maximum rider weight being 130 pounds.)
Wow. that looks very similar in concept to a bike my partner's grandpa built in the 50's (I'm guessing). He replaced the bottom bracket and cranks with a pair of sliders, like drawer slides, and a pair of springs situated vertically, parallel with the seat tube. An opened up bike chain wrapped around the back sprocket, along the chainstay to where the bottom bracket should be, and connected to the slider thing. The idea was that you just pumped the slide down, the chain turned the sprocket and on the spring assisted return stroke, the freewheel let the chain go forward again. Something like that. It was a long time ago that I saw that device.

IRL, you pumped the "pedals" down and rose up off the seat, but it was fun to fool around on.
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
DR250
DRZ400SM
GSX250E


Leofric

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Reply #7 on: January 07, 2023, 12:59:24 am
2017 Kawasaki VN900 Classic special edition and 2022 Royal Enfield Classic 350 Euro 5 ,dark gunmetal grey.