Author Topic: My YSS shocks setup.  (Read 369 times)

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CPJS

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on: January 12, 2022, 02:55:14 pm
I have just had a measure of my YSS shocks, it is still a work in progress, but I think it is in the ballpark for my 73kg weight. The setup out of the box, for me, had too much of everything and felt solid and jarring.

 Set the dynamic sag correctly and leave it there unless you put someone one the back or do heavy weight touring then you need to reset the sag and the damping to suit, probably a couple of clicks of each.

Preload. 19mm of thread above the locking collar to give me 26mm of sag, you need an extra pair of hands for this.
Damping, clicks from minimum.
Rebound       4 clicks
Compression 7 clicks

Once you have your base setting WRITE IT DOWN. If you make a change WRITE IT DOWN then after you get used to the new setting go back to the base setting again then you get a better feel of the changes you make as people tend to notice things being taken away more than being added.
Only make changes to one thing at a time, then WRITE IT DOWN. did I say WRITE IT DOWN?
Most of us here like to think 'i'll remember it was two clicks of rebound and three of comp'. Shit happens and a month later you are cursing, was it 2 of this and 3 of that or 3 of this and 2 of that. Ask me how I know.
Current bikes.
R E GT650
BMW R1200GS
Honda CRF250L
BSA B25SS

Still young enough not to care, too old to remember why.


YellowDuck

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Reply #1 on: January 12, 2022, 03:09:45 pm
I installed mine recently and got the sag set in the garage, and set the rebound in the ballpark with a bounce test (too wintry her for a ride).  But honest to Pete I couldn't see any effect of the compression adjustment no matter what I did, from full in to full out.  32 clicks and no discernible change in a bounce test.  What was your experience with the compression adjustment?


NVDucati

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Reply #2 on: January 12, 2022, 04:11:36 pm
I installed mine recently and got the sag set in the garage, and set the rebound in the ballpark with a bounce test (too wintry her for a ride).  But honest to Pete I couldn't see any effect of the compression adjustment no matter what I did, from full in to full out.  32 clicks and no discernible change in a bounce test.  What was your experience with the compression adjustment?
You shouldn't expect a garage bounce test to display much regarding compression because the early part of the stroke is happening way too slowly. Think of it as filling a paper bag with air and popping it. And then trying to pop it, slowly.
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Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT, '06 ST1300P


CPJS

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Reply #3 on: January 12, 2022, 06:04:31 pm
I installed mine recently and got the sag set in the garage, and set the rebound in the ballpark with a bounce test (too wintry her for a ride).  But honest to Pete I couldn't see any effect of the compression adjustment no matter what I did, from full in to full out.  32 clicks and no discernible change in a bounce test.  What was your experience with the compression adjustment?
Because the base setting was so firm I wound right off and started off from there adding a click at a time.
I ride very hard and I am a suspension botherer, If you don't ride hard try with four clicks of comp from minimum as a start.
Make sure that sag is correct, if you did it by yourself it is probably wrong. It needs to be measured near the shock as possible .

The shock stroke ( if it is the same as stock) is only 88mm, I worked on 30% sag that only leaves 62mm of stroke if you hit a bump, not a lot of room to play with.
This suspension is never going to be a magic carpet ride with that short travel so setup is quite important to find that Goldilocks setting between bottoming out and breaking your back and no movement at all and throwing you out off the seat.
With a short stroke shock people sometimes mistake bottoming out for being too harsh and soften off the preload making it worse, if you seem to going round in circles go back to base and start again. It is a process of elimination, you will find a setting that does the least harm to your butt.
Patience, experimentation and the base settings for when you end up in a muddle. The final setting will be a compromise to accomodate 70% of your riding, the other 30% you will just have suck it up.

Just to add add another thing to the mix is ride height, to be honest on the RE it doesn't seem to make any difference to the handling to me. I have it set to the max of 10mm of thread showing as I want as much ground clearance as I can get.
 At first I was grounding the TEC 2-1 headers, I loosened them off and re jiggled them maybe gaining a MM or two and with the ride height maxxed out front(Andreani Fork Cartridge Kit) and rear, plus Conti Road Attack 100/90 and 130/80 rear, that should give 20mm over stock. I have not yet ground the headers on the road with this setup, I may do a classic trackday this year then we will see!
Current bikes.
R E GT650
BMW R1200GS
Honda CRF250L
BSA B25SS

Still young enough not to care, too old to remember why.


whippers

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Reply #4 on: January 12, 2022, 06:29:43 pm
Grounding the TEC 2-1 seems to be quite an issue? I have seen a few YouTube videos where it seems to ground at not an especially quick pace. I find the ground clearance quite good on my bike with the leg feelers removed and only very rarely touch the centrestand in a right hander but that was before I increased preload on the stock shocks from 1 to 3 and haven’t had a problem since.
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2007 Ducati Monster S4RS

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NJ Mike

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Reply #5 on: January 12, 2022, 07:40:57 pm
I installed mine recently and got the sag set in the garage, and set the rebound in the ballpark with a bounce test (too wintry her for a ride).  But honest to Pete I couldn't see any effect of the compression adjustment no matter what I did, from full in to full out.  32 clicks and no discernible change in a bounce test.  What was your experience with the compression adjustment?

I found with my YSS shocks, when I backed off the compression settings I had to ride a bit, maybe a few minutes/miles before I noticed a difference. I don't know what mechanism they use, but with backing off, it seemed to take a while to settle in.
Been riding since 1980. Live in Bloomfield, NJ.

Current Ride: 2019 RE Conti GT 650

Past Rides: 2002 SV 650, 2001 Moto-Guzzi V11 Sport, 1985 BMW K75, 1992 Honda 750 Nighthawk, 1982 Yamaha Vision, 1981 Kawasaki GPZ 550, 1978 Honda 750F, 1980 Honda 650


YellowDuck

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Reply #6 on: January 13, 2022, 04:00:32 pm
You shouldn't expect a garage bounce test to display much regarding compression because the early part of the stroke is happening way too slowly. Think of it as filling a paper bag with air and popping it. And then trying to pop it, slowly.

That's kind of what I was thinking as well, but on the other hand with the Penske on my Duc I and definitely feel the difference between full hard and full soft on compression, just by bouncing the bike.


NVDucati

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Reply #7 on: January 13, 2022, 05:21:41 pm
That's kind of what I was thinking as well, but on the other hand with the Penske on my Duc I and definitely feel the difference between full hard and full soft on compression, just by bouncing the bike.
Not sure which Duc you have. Could it be a mono-shock with a link/lever connection? The finer graduation is why they exist.
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Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT, '06 ST1300P


YellowDuck

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Reply #8 on: January 14, 2022, 12:03:15 am
Not sure which Duc you have. Could it be a mono-shock with a link/lever connection? The finer graduation is why they exist.

No, 2006 sport 1000 sport classic.  No linkage.


NVDucati

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Reply #9 on: January 14, 2022, 02:02:28 am
No, 2006 sport 1000 sport classic.  No linkage.
Ahh, those are such cool motorcycles. Sometimes I still think I should have bought one.
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Current Rides: '14 DL1000 ADV, '06 SV650N, '93 900CBRR, '74 Ducati 750GT, '06 ST1300P


BlackIce619

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Reply #10 on: January 14, 2022, 04:14:16 pm
Ahh, those are such cool motorcycles. Sometimes I still think I should have bought one.

My buddy has one which is quite modified. Great motorcycle! I just realized we also have one for sale in the area for about $9,500.

https://sandiego.craigslist.org/csd/mcy/d/san-diego-2007-ducati-sport-classic-gt/7427901151.html

2019 RE Continental GT 650 - Ice Queen


YellowDuck

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Reply #11 on: January 14, 2022, 07:22:41 pm
My buddy has one which is quite modified. Great motorcycle! I just realized we also have one for sale in the area for about $9,500.

https://sandiego.craigslist.org/csd/mcy/d/san-diego-2007-ducati-sport-classic-gt/7427901151.html

That's the GT, which has the dual-sided suspension.  Mine is a 2006 monoposto, single sided suspension with curved swingarm.  It as been a track bike only since 2013 or so...in fact I won the Battle of the Twins lightweight class on it in our local series in 2015.  I had an online blog for two and half seasons, if you are interested in a lot of writing and photos and videos showing what club racing looks like in Canada. 

https://prairiedogracing282.blogspot.com/2015/07/round-4-your-jedi-mind-tricks-dont-work.html