Author Topic: adding lightness  (Read 13640 times)

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him a layin

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Reply #105 on: February 07, 2024, 09:24:25 pm
another lovely day for a foray to the pond. heron, canada geese and something i think was a grebe. then down to my credit union atm, and up to the plaza to practice serpentines, which went well. some A.H. ran a stop sign but i managed to dodge him.


NJ-Brett

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Reply #106 on: February 12, 2024, 01:01:10 pm
I had a Himalayan in the past and sold it as being too heavy for me in the sand around here.
When looking for this years bike I went to all the dealers around sitting on bikes, and one had the scrambler and Himalayan
next to each other along with the Classic 350 and all the other models.
The Scrambler felt MUCH lighter (less top heavy) then the Himalayan or even the Classic, the Hunter felt light.
Off road, its still over 400 pounds, but feels better then the Himalayan.
Looking at the bike, not a lot of weight can be removed without spending a lot of money.
Lighter silencer/exhaust, battery.
Lighter wheels/tires will cost a LOT.
The bike is sturdy, its got thick spokes, solid rims, steel frame and swingarm, 4 gallon gas tank and a heavy engine.
And its a big bike, not a little thing.
If you want light, this is not the bike for you off road.
It IS light for a street bike.


zimmemr

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Reply #107 on: February 12, 2024, 01:30:42 pm
I had a Himalayan in the past and sold it as being too heavy for me in the sand around here.
When looking for this years bike I went to all the dealers around sitting on bikes, and one had the scrambler and Himalayan
next to each other along with the Classic 350 and all the other models.
The Scrambler felt MUCH lighter (less top heavy) then the Himalayan or even the Classic, the Hunter felt light.
Off road, its still over 400 pounds, but feels better then the Himalayan.
Looking at the bike, not a lot of weight can be removed without spending a lot of money.
Lighter silencer/exhaust, battery.
Lighter wheels/tires will cost a LOT.
The bike is sturdy, its got thick spokes, solid rims, steel frame and swingarm, 4 gallon gas tank and a heavy engine.
And its a big bike, not a little thing.
If you want light, this is not the bike for you off road.
It IS light for a street bike.

+1 I love my Himalayan and it's a fine bike for poking around on dirt roads, but it's no more of an off-road bike than my Interceptor.  ;D


him a layin

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Reply #108 on: February 13, 2024, 10:35:18 am
i've dropped pokey twice now, once in slick clay and once on wet grass. no, it's not a dirt bike. and i've had bigger more powerful road bikes that weigh about the same, i think the real diff is the weight distribution. the himalayan (maybe all ADV bikes?) seems top-heavy.

the desire to strip off or swap out for less weight is strong, as is the desire to go big-bore or other performance improvements, but for now it's going to stay stock or nearly so. i'm 70 years old and this is my return to motorcycles after 35 years away, and as a re-learner bike i'm very satisfied, it gets me around to interesting places with less temptation to do stupid chit that could get me kilt. it still makes me nervous to go over 50 mph. at some point i may feel confident enough to get something with more giddy-up, i have a grail bike in mind, and the continental gt 650 is visually appealing.


AzCal Retred

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Reply #109 on: February 13, 2024, 04:08:37 pm
These have always intrigued me. They really hold their price too, so people like them. Light and capable in dryer conditions, not snotty power sucking mud. The tires allow for excellent flotation in sand. The 18 or so ponies are enough for the weight. Nice package.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamaha_TW200
https://www.motorcyclistonline.com/reviews/yamaha-tw200-review-2023/
https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/yamaha/yamaha_TW%20200%2018.htm
« Last Edit: February 13, 2024, 04:12:12 pm by AzCal Retred »
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zimmemr

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Reply #110 on: February 13, 2024, 06:40:45 pm
These have always intrigued me. They really hold their price too, so people like them. Light and capable in dryer conditions, not snotty power sucking mud. The tires allow for excellent flotation in sand. The 18 or so ponies are enough for the weight. Nice package.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamaha_TW200
https://www.motorcyclistonline.com/reviews/yamaha-tw200-review-2023/
https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/yamaha/yamaha_TW%20200%2018.htm

A couple of guys in our off-road club have them and I'm always amazed at how competent they are. Really nice bikes, especially if you're not in a rush. ;)


NJ-Brett

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Reply #111 on: February 14, 2024, 08:57:40 pm
I have had three TW200's and may have another at some point.
They are great in the sand and mud, great at a lower pace off road, very comfortable and easy to ride off road.
Under 280 pounds, low seat, fat tires, replace the poor front tire with something better, the stock one is no good on street or dirt.
You can upgrade the suspension to go faster in the rough, air down the tires to 5 or 6 psi, change the very low gearing so it can hit 70 mph, get a big gas tank and many other goodies.
Its a reliable solid bike.


him a layin

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Reply #112 on: Yesterday at 09:42:03 pm
at last, another lovely day. did my serpentines, noticed my fuel was low. 2.9 gallons, cashier let me slide on the 8 cents. then to the pond and down to the next town to visit.