Author Topic: Work shop manual  (Read 5680 times)

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SAM+TUCKER

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on: September 22, 2021, 01:33:50 pm
I have a new meter 350 here in Indiana USA anyone know when we can get a workshop manual or all of the technical information we need my dealer will not supply it to me he says he can’t even get it unless he goes into his computer I’ve always worked on all of 30 + motorcycles don’t allow others to work on them  for me I like to understand everything about my motorcycle engine schematics  everything
HELP when we get this information


Dexter

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Reply #1 on: September 22, 2021, 04:38:54 pm
I have a new meter 350 here in Indiana USA anyone know when we can get a workshop manual or all of the technical information we need my dealer will not supply it to me he says he can’t even get it unless he goes into his computer I’ve always worked on all of 30 + motorcycles don’t allow others to work on them  for me I like to understand everything about my motorcycle engine schematics  everything
HELP when we get this information

For whatever reason, Royal Enfield likes to keep owners in the dark when it comes to the technical information usually found in a factory service manual. Maybe this is intended to help support the maintenance side of their developing dealer network. Even the Owner's Manual is light on many basic service requirements.

Certainly a departure from the norm in the m/c industry, where service manuals are generally available to buy as soon as a new model hits the showrooms.

Hitchcock's website does have RE manuals for older models and even for the 650 models that have been out for almost 4 years now, so if one becomes available for the Meteor, this is the most likely place that we will find it.

Here's a link to some info that RE has provided on some Meteor 350 jobs.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLT1BEDU54E1SKBG28gF49AclawHddstLm
« Last Edit: September 22, 2021, 04:43:20 pm by Dexter »
Past rides:
1966 Honda 65 Sport
1967 Honda CB160
1973 Honda CB750
1982 Honda V45 Magna - the most uncomfortable bike I ever did a cross country tour on!
1983 Honda CB1000
1995 Honda ST1100

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1996 Honda ST1100
2021 Royal Enfield Stellar Blue Meteor 350


Keef Sparrow

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Past: CB125-T2, T500, GT500, Speed Triple, 955i Daytona. Now: Royal Enfield Bullet Trials 500


glencoeman

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Reply #3 on: September 22, 2021, 07:38:45 pm
https://www.royalenfield.com/uk/en/support/owners-manual/
Yes, that's the owners manual - the one that come with the bike - not a workshop manual.


GSS

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Reply #4 on: September 23, 2021, 01:15:50 am
The original US distributor, Classic Motor Works used to sell nice bound books before PDFs for all REs showed up online.  It is only a matter of time before the Meteor manual shows up as well.

Meanwhile the Himalayan and Interceptor manuals are a reasonable starting point for basic stuff like torque settings etc.
2021 Meteor 350 Supernova Blue
2019 Himalayan Snow
2019 Interceptor 650 - Chrome...off the first boat!
Previous REs:
2014 Continental GT 535 - Red...lowest VIN off the first boat!
2010 Classic 500 - Teal Chrome


Indobiker

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Reply #5 on: October 14, 2021, 11:29:09 am
Anyone heard any update on the existence/availability of a workshop manual for the Meteor? I live too far away from my dealer (1,100km) so I need to use a local mechanic who's worked on RE bikes in the past. But even he would like to see a copy of the manual since the Meteor has a brand new engine.
Meteor 350 Supernova Brown


SAM+TUCKER

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Reply #6 on: October 22, 2021, 08:09:47 am
Set a email to Haynes asking them if they had any plans for a future service manual for the new Meteor 350 with the new J series engine.

Replied.    Not on their list for the future.



Dexter

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Reply #7 on: October 22, 2021, 05:05:10 pm
Set a email to Haynes asking them if they had any plans for a future service manual for the new Meteor 350 with the new J series engine.

Replied.    Not on their list for the future.

Since you have some initiative in this quest, maybe you could contact Clymer too, to see if they have one in the works? Actually, a consensus of the service manuals available for the Honda ST1100 has shown that Haynes ranks last, with Clymer in second place and the Honda manual being tops. I suspect this could hold true for all brands.
Past rides:
1966 Honda 65 Sport
1967 Honda CB160
1973 Honda CB750
1982 Honda V45 Magna - the most uncomfortable bike I ever did a cross country tour on!
1983 Honda CB1000
1995 Honda ST1100

Current rides:
1996 Honda ST1100
2021 Royal Enfield Stellar Blue Meteor 350


Carlsberg Wordsworth

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Reply #8 on: October 22, 2021, 09:03:38 pm
It took a few years for Haynes to bring one out for the Bullet.

You'd think though, given the rise in R.E popularity, and that they lend themselves well to the home mechanic, that they'd be on it pdq.


SAM+TUCKER

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Reply #9 on: October 23, 2021, 06:15:20 am
Since you have some initiative in this quest, maybe you could contact Clymer too, to see if they have one in the works? Actually, a consensus of the service manuals available for the Honda ST1100 has shown that Haynes ranks last, with Clymer in second place and the Honda manual being tops. I suspect this could hold true for all brands.


I attempted to do that however it looks as if Clymers is associated with Haynes manuals somehow they’re connected or one and the same company. Clymers only list one book for motorcycles a vintage book that includes  many different brands and it has been discontinued


Indobiker

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Reply #10 on: November 10, 2021, 01:56:41 pm
Recent update from my dealer... Royal Enfield will NOT provide (for sale or otherwise) a workshop manual for owners of the Meteor 350. It seems that the new Royal Enfield business model is that owners are to be locked into their local authorised service centre for maintenance and repairs. It's kind of like the luxury watch business model, where expensive routine service that can only be done by the dealer is often necessary to keep your investment working properly. Personally, I find this appalling, especially since I live 1,100 kilometres away from the nearest service centre (for some reason, Royal Enfield has been dramatically shrinking its network in Indonesia). Food for thought for any wannabe owner of a Meteor. Be prepared to pay your local service centre to do everything for you, or else make guesses about the technical specifications (eg torque settings) for maintaining, repairing or accessorising your motorbike if you want to DIY. While I love my Meteor, given that in Indonesia the one and only authorised dealer isn't able to provide vehicle licensing for at least four months after purchase (which they conveniently neglect to mention at the time of sale) and then expect you to use them for service even if you are a thousand kilometres away, has given me major buyer's remorse. Anyone from Indonesia reading this should really re-consider buying a Royal Enfield Meteor 350, it's not worth the hassle given the bike's USD 8,000 price tag here. In the meantime, fingers crossed for a brave soul in an official RE workshop somewhere in the world to post the manual online...
Meteor 350 Supernova Brown


Bilgemaster

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Reply #11 on: November 10, 2021, 03:42:51 pm
It took a few years for Haynes to bring one out for the Bullet.

You'd think though, given the rise in R.E popularity, and that they lend themselves well to the home mechanic, that they'd be on it pdq.

Haynes may have squeezed out a manual for the UCE Bullets, but we original model "Iron Barrel" owners are still waiting for ours. How long's it been since the longest continuously-produced and virtually unchanged model of vehicle ever manufactured first saw the light of day? Seventy years or so? And we're still waiting? Maybe those new Meteor owners shouldn't hold their breath for a so-called Haynes Book of Lies. (Actually, I adore my Norton Twins one)

I like the new Meteors. I really do. Yet, unlike the still reasonably fresh crop of newfangled 650s, for which a service manual is readily available, I'd find it very hard to unreservedly recommend purchasing a Meteor or its Classic sibling if Royal Enfield has decided to suppress access by owners to even the most basic means of maintaining it. Even the apparent closely-held mystery regarding something so mundane as the proper type spark plug to use in it is also troubling.

Perhaps all that closely-held secrecy and blunt advisories to "See your authorized Royal Enfield Service Center" may make some sillyass kinda sense in their home market, where dealerships may abound, but as others have already pointed out, all self-reliance and "bootstrappiness" aside, such dismissive highhandedness just to drive business their way may not be an entirely feasible notion in locales where one's nearest dealership may be several hundred kilometers or even miles distant.

Until the veil is lifted, I personally wouldn't even consider buying a Meteor new or used any more than I might some mongrel Chinese scoot for which parts and service info are basically inobtainable.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2021, 06:40:52 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India. Yet it squeaks by here in Virginia.

 


20MarkIII

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Reply #12 on: November 10, 2021, 03:56:22 pm
Kind of ties in with RE's instruction to take your Meteor to a dealer to have fasteners properly torqued as seen on their Maintenance Tutorials. WTH? You do the work but still have to pay a dealer torque fasteners? SMH... ::)


Fubars

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Reply #13 on: November 10, 2021, 04:17:32 pm
Personally it doesn't bother me, I have a brand new bike with three years warranty so I'm covered for the first three years.

After that if I keep it and don't px it, I plan on getting it regularly serviced by a RE dealership so again not my problem.

My only problem then is to decide where to go for a ride  ;).
Past rides
MT 50
RD125LC
FS1E
Katana 650
BSA Bantam D7
RD250LC
XJR 400
RD250D
RD250B
Suzuki B120 x2
CD175 x2
Tricity 125
Inazuma 250
Burgman 400
Nightwing 250


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Meteor 350 Fireball Red


Dexter

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Reply #14 on: November 10, 2021, 04:50:15 pm
Personally it doesn't bother me, I have a brand new bike with three years warranty so I'm covered for the first three years.

After that if I keep it and don't px it, I plan on getting it regularly serviced by a RE dealership so again not my problem.

My only problem then is to decide where to go for a ride  ;).

Yes, you ARE covered for three years, should some component fail, as we all are, but you are not covered for all the routine maintenance costs that you see listed in your owner's manual and those services, (shop rate @ $80 - $100.00 per hour), which many of us are capable of doing ourselves, will cost you a bundle over three years and for as long as you own the bike.

Stories of bungled work done on owner's bikes by dealers abounds on any m/c website you can find, hence, those that are capable like to do it themselves to ensure it is done right, according to the factory service manual in many cases.

Right to repair legislation is being looked at by governments right now, as this corporate money grab, by holding vehicle specifications hostage by the manufacturer and dealers, is an overreach of their authority over the vehicles they sell.

If you are happy to spend hundreds, or thousands of dollars over the course of many years of owning a vehicle, that is your right, but most of us would prefer to save that money for trips and fuel and buying just those parts that we need to keep our bikes in fine working order.

In 26 years of owning a Honda ST1100, I have saved literally tens of thousands of dollars by doing all the work on this bike myself, except for tire changes, thanks to having the factory service manual from Honda.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2021, 04:56:12 pm by Dexter »
Past rides:
1966 Honda 65 Sport
1967 Honda CB160
1973 Honda CB750
1982 Honda V45 Magna - the most uncomfortable bike I ever did a cross country tour on!
1983 Honda CB1000
1995 Honda ST1100

Current rides:
1996 Honda ST1100
2021 Royal Enfield Stellar Blue Meteor 350