Author Topic: Tyre repair  (Read 565 times)

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ioukaa

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on: June 20, 2021, 02:45:42 pm
Stupid question but I just don't know - how you would repair your tyre on the road, what product do you use? As its tubeless but with a tube in I am a little confused!


Jack Straw

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Reply #1 on: June 20, 2021, 03:06:51 pm
Repair of the tubed tire on the road is a pretty big project. You'll need a good patch kit, likely another tube of the right size,  quality tire irons, tools to remove the wheel, a way to support the bike, a compressor to run off your battery or lacking that several co2 cartridges.  Assuming you have all that with you the next thing you need is the practical experience to accomplish this job.

It's a major hassle which is why some of us have converted our spoke wheels to run tubeless which will allow most puntures to be repaired with a simple plug kit and an air source eliminating the need to de-mount the tire from the rim.



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Karl Fenn

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Reply #2 on: June 20, 2021, 03:27:54 pm
I think the recovery truck is the best idea under the circumstances.


Suncoast

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Reply #3 on: June 20, 2021, 05:46:02 pm
I wonder if a flat would fall under the 3 years road side assistance offered as part of the warranty? I haven't seen any paperwork on the assistance portion of out warranty.
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Bilgemaster

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Reply #4 on: June 20, 2021, 06:43:51 pm
I think the recovery truck is the best idea under the circumstances.

I concur with Karl! Especially if you're tooling around on a 650, presumably with  still-valid 3 year Roadside Recovery Service. Me? For my various vehicles I've got AAA+ with the added RV service required for free motorcycle towing up to 100 miles, with just $1 per mile beyond that. Back when I lived in the UK, several decades ago, I had the similar RAC (Royal Automobile Club) service. It was great too. Hope it's just as good nowadays.

Of course, my old Bullet is blessed with rather easy-to-remove wheels. In fact, the rear can be pulled off without even disturbing the brake assembly. Do the 650s still have that "easy rear wheel release" setup, I wonder? Probably not, what with all that disky-ABS goodness. But yeah, I'd just get the whole plot schlepped home or to a shop. I generally carry along enough tools to get my wheels off on longish tours, but you're no longer likely to see me patching up a tube roadside. However, just getting off the wheel yourself would typically save you $100 or so at a shop.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2021, 06:57:35 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.

(Legal enough to pass muster if they don't look too closely in Woodbridge, Virginia, where the buses don't run at night, holidays or weekends and I'm a contender for 'Village Idiot')


Jack Straw

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Reply #5 on: June 20, 2021, 11:01:49 pm
The 650 rear wheel can be an absolute monster to re-install even in a nice clean, well-lit, comfortable shop as a few members can attest.  Wrestling with it on the side of the road in heat, wind, cold, traffic whizzing by, and all that is not something anyone would fancy.

I suppose if one lives and rides mostly in cities and built up suburban areas it would be best to call your preferred recovery service.
For those of us who ride "out there" phone service is frequently absent.

This is why the supreme being gave us tubeless tires and good patch kits.
Know-it-alls and blowhards will please go elsewhere.


gizzo

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Reply #6 on: June 20, 2021, 11:53:02 pm
Stupid question but I just don't know - how you would repair your tyre on the road, what product do you use? As its tubeless but with a tube in I am a little confused!

I wouldn't call that a stupid question at all. It's been discussed before but thread drift makes info hard to find even if you go looking.

Me: If I'm close to home (in the local hills or down the coast) I'd ask a friend or my other half to come rescue me. I'd do the same for them. If I'm touring I take tyre mending gear with. It's not super bulky. A pair of michelin levers, a tube, a small patch kit and a compact bike pump. Crossed fingers I never need them but if it happens, I'm good to fix it myself. I guess it would depend how far I was from help. The closer I was to help, the more likely I'd take advantage of that. Roadside recovery here could take all day. I completely understand other rider's reluctance to do the same though. It can be a challenge. Those Enfield rims are pretty difficult to get tyres off of. A tubeless conversion is really worth considering. It'd make life a lot easier.

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ioukaa

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Reply #7 on: June 21, 2021, 09:38:02 am
Thank you for the detailed replies everyone. I think I'll cross my fingers and hope nothing happens then, maybe a tubeless conversion one day... Thank you!


fireypete

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Reply #8 on: June 21, 2021, 12:39:53 pm
Hey Jack...you mentioned some of you have converted to tubleless. Is that applying silicone and stuff to the rim
? Does it work? Would like to go tubeless, not much phone reception where I ride. Oh, the Interceptor rim Is made for tubeless tyres and the Pirelli tyres can run with or without a tube.  Just getting that in before someone tells me the rim is for tubes tyres only!


Jack Straw

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Reply #9 on: June 21, 2021, 02:14:08 pm
Pete,

The tubeless conversion has been used by several forum member before I got around to it. I used Dap sealer on  the nipples overlaid with a 3M closed cell sealing tape.  It works very nicely but is a tedious job.

There is a Japanese product, Outex, which is available on EBay in a kit form with a different sealer tape.  I decided to use the "home brew" method  but the Outex products seem to work very well.  One of our members had the Outex process done by Woodys Wheel Works in Denver.  They do great work but it can run up towards $600 if you ship your wheels to them.

An online search will bring up several informative videos on the subject.

As I mentioned it is a pain in the butt job. Not really hard, just fussy, but I think the peace of mind when your far from home is totally worthwhile.   Indeed, our rims work fine with a tubeless set up.
 
Know-it-alls and blowhards will please go elsewhere.


Hoiho

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Reply #10 on: June 21, 2021, 09:52:17 pm
Thank you for the detailed replies everyone. I think I'll cross my fingers and hope nothing happens then, maybe a tubeless conversion one day... Thank you!

Or take a couple of small items that will get you home or at least somewhere you can more easily repair the tube...







zimmemr

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Reply #11 on: June 21, 2021, 10:00:22 pm
Or take a couple of small items that will get you home or at least somewhere you can more easily repair the tube...





I always thought a "pocket pump" was something else  ;) Kidding aside those are two handy items.  8)


Karl Fenn

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Reply #12 on: June 21, 2021, 11:00:39 pm
I have to agree after owing my 650 for just one week l took a screw, the wheel can be a right pain in the ass to install you need a chock to raise it up, if it was tubeless could be plugged, l don't know what these liquid tire repair cans are like l have never used them but some say for tubeless only does anyone have any experience with them to confirm they work.


ioukaa

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Reply #13 on: June 22, 2021, 09:48:26 am
I would also love to know if this kind of product works with the stock wheels!


Hoiho

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Reply #14 on: June 22, 2021, 10:33:02 am
I would also love to know if this kind of product works with the stock wheels!

Of course - https://motul.co.nz/product/mc-care-p3-tyre-repair/

Here's an Indian gentleman puncturing a 650 wheel for your viewing pleasure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nzVzOej8n5E
« Last Edit: June 22, 2021, 10:38:07 am by Hoiho »