Author Topic: New tyres question  (Read 256 times)

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Mark1971

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on: June 19, 2021, 07:16:49 pm
Has anyone purchased the Ensign trials tyres that Hitchcocks sell for the classic 500? My back tyre is almost shot after 4000 miles and I fancy putting something that looks a bit chunkier on it. They seem great value for money, but not sure what their wear rate will be with them being a block tread pattern. I would be swapping out both tyres.
Mark from Durham, UK
Classic 500 - military, 2020
Aprilia Shiver 2010


AzCal Retred

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Reply #1 on: June 19, 2021, 09:51:36 pm
The Duro HF-307 "trials tires" are worth a look. The HF-308 is the "street universal"(K70 like) and has held up well for me. Both are very affordable.
A trifecta of Bullets: a Red Deluxe 500, a Green Standard 500, and a Black ES 350.


Nitrowing

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Reply #2 on: June 19, 2021, 11:01:23 pm
This is at least the 3rd time I've read about rear tyres wearing out in around 4000 miles!
My 140bhp CBR1000 would get 4000 miles out of a rear tyre, what's eating them on Enfields?!  :o
No wonder we no longer have a motor industry


Gian4

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Reply #3 on: June 19, 2021, 11:28:11 pm
I wounder if the low tire pressures Enfield recommends we run is partially responsible for the poor tire mileage. 
Gian4


Richard230

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Reply #4 on: June 19, 2021, 11:41:27 pm
This is at least the 3rd time I've read about rear tyres wearing out in around 4000 miles!
My 140bhp CBR1000 would get 4000 miles out of a rear tyre, what's eating them on Enfields?!  :o

On my BMW R1200RS I typically get between 8 and 9,000 miles out of a set of sport-touring radial tires. My Bullet's original Avon Slipmaster II tires lasted about 5K miles.  :( I run 24psi in the front and 32psi in the rear and only ride solo. 

My BMW weighs about 120 pounds heavier than the Bullet and I run the recommended 36psi front and 42psi rear, but radial tires typically require higher pressures as their sidewalls are not as stiff as bias-ply tires like the RE uses. Anyway, I agree that the Royal Enfield should not be all that hard on tires. Perhaps the manufacturers are using a soft rubber compound to provide a comfortable ride or maybe to stick better off-road?  ???
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Mark1971

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Reply #5 on: June 19, 2021, 11:42:50 pm
I run 32 psi in the rear tyre and it's almost at the wear indicators now. I'm going on a 1000 miles trip in just over a weeks time, so reckon it will be finished when I get home. I don't think the tyre started life with a very deep tread from new which could explain the poor mileage from it. If I'm looking at old school tyre sizes am I correct in thinking 19x3.25 front and 18x4.00 rear for my C5?
Mark from Durham, UK
Classic 500 - military, 2020
Aprilia Shiver 2010


Keef Sparrow

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Reply #6 on: June 20, 2021, 01:32:52 pm
I wounder if the low tire pressures Enfield recommends we run is partially responsible for the poor tire mileage. 
Gian4
That wouldn't surprise me at all. The tyre pressures on the sticker on the swinging arm might be OK for low speeds on poor quality or unsurfaced Indian roads but seem way too low for UK road use.  :-\
Past: CB125-T2, T500, GT500, Speed Triple, 955i Daytona. Now: Royal Enfield Bullet Trials 500


Keef Sparrow

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Reply #7 on: June 20, 2021, 01:43:31 pm
This is at least the 3rd time I've read about rear tyres wearing out in around 4000 miles!
My 140bhp CBR1000 would get 4000 miles out of a rear tyre, what's eating them on Enfields?!  :o
Good question. Maybe it's the shock/vibration from the big 500 engine with no balancer shaft - maybe in conjunction with the high torque at low revs putting a lot of strain on the skinny tyres when pulling away smartly? Also, is there a cush drive fitted to the rear wheel hub to absorb shock? Was there a cush drive on older models that was maybe deleted on the change over to the new hub for the disc rear brake?
Past: CB125-T2, T500, GT500, Speed Triple, 955i Daytona. Now: Royal Enfield Bullet Trials 500


AzCal Retred

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Reply #8 on: June 20, 2021, 07:10:15 pm
I think R230's right on point. " Perhaps the manufacturers are using a soft rubber compound "
It's my opinion that the major players have deliberately put soft rubber into these tires because the 3.50 x 19, 4.00 x 19, 4.00 x 18 sizes are generally installed on "classic" machinery that doesn't normally have a lot of miles applied, mostly they rot off, not wear off. K70's wore like iron in the 1970's, but the machines using these were often used for daily transport. As the market changed, there was opportunity to cheapen the product and bump up per unit profits. There certainly wasn't any "brain fade" about how to build tires between 1971 and 2021, that petrochemical data didn't get lost. Tires are WAY better today - imagine a Hayabusa shod with brand new 1971 Dunlop K70 4.00 x 18's; would YOU ride it? But the 25-40 HP 350 Hondas, 500 Hondas  & Triumph Twins of that time managed to regularly run 8,000 - 12,000 on K70's.
The Duro seems to be on par with an 1970's era K70, so apparently they aren't gaming the market and are using traditional work-a-day 1970's formula rubber compounds. Maybe they are still establishing market presence. Anyway, I recommend them for durability and normal usage.
If you decide want to push some limits, then buy an actual high dollar performance tire with state-of-the-art rubber compound and tread pattern. It won't look "traditional" but you'll fall off less, all the while outlasting the "new" K70 copies.
A trifecta of Bullets: a Red Deluxe 500, a Green Standard 500, and a Black ES 350.


Richard230

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Reply #9 on: June 21, 2021, 01:48:50 am
I was thumbing through my huge Clymer BMW airhead service manual today and in the front of the book it lists the BMW recommended air pressures for various model years for speeds up to 100 mph. 1970-1973 rider only: 30 psi front/33 psi rear, when carrying a passenger: 33 psi front/38psi rear.  1974-1976 rider only: 30 psi front/31 psi rear, when carrying a passenger: 31 psi front/35 psi rear.  1977-1987 rider only 27 psi front/29 psi rear, when carrying a passenger 30 psi front/32 psi rear. 1988-on (up to the speed limit - no speed mentioned) rider only: 31 psi front/36 psi rear, when carrying a passenger: 34 psi front/41 psi rear.

It is interesting how the recommended tire pressures varied over the various model years. I can't recall if the 1988-on models used tubeless tires, but I am pretty sure that the previous years used tube-type bias-ply tires, although the later models may have dispensed with the tubes. I know that my daughter's 1981 R65LS has cast wheels but tubes were required in that model.
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM Duke 390, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


suitcasejefferson

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Reply #10 on: June 22, 2021, 07:03:53 am
I have pretty much the same tires that came on my 2013. The originals lasted over 10K miles. I keep the pressure at 34 psi. I'm on the heavy side at 240. I got new tires from Hitchcocks. I bought them for the looks more than anything else. The Enfield is not a daily rider, it is strictly a recreational bike, so I am not that concerned about the traction or life of the tires. I want it to look right, and never had any issues with the oem tires. I ride about 55 mph and don't try to lean the bike way over in curves. If it's a really sharp curve, I just slow down. For high performance riding there are much more suitable bikes with modern tires.
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