Author Topic: Carb conversion mess  (Read 1029 times)

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jobinjv

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on: June 04, 2021, 05:53:21 pm
Hi

I started on the project of converting my C5 EFI to Carburetor. But sort has got stuck as it’s about to be over.

It’s a product from indiMotard.

https://indimotard.com/product/efi-to-carb-conversion-kit/
I did try to reach out to them but may be cos of the restrictions in places here in India, I unfortunately didn’t get a reply yet.

I am left with these inlets on the carb and I’m not sure what goes into what

A, B, C, D are inlets on the carb. E was on the bike and F is the new map sensor valve.




















Beside I have attached another image just to know why there is an inlet on the top of the engine.




Haggis

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Reply #1 on: June 04, 2021, 07:52:16 pm
Off route, recalculate?


jobinjv

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Reply #2 on: June 05, 2021, 04:11:27 am
Yeah, I’m familiar with this video. But it never says about the inlet connection.

He has mentioned about covering the map sensor but in my case they supplied something that will use the old O ring and snap on the carb with the plate removed from the EFI.

But it too has an outlet. Being a map sensor should it be left open ?
« Last Edit: June 05, 2021, 04:22:18 am by jobinjv »


Haggis

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Reply #3 on: June 05, 2021, 09:47:48 am
Map sensor needs to measure air pressure/vacuum in the inlet manifold.
I would guess that it goes to the pipe in photo A.
Off route, recalculate?


jobinjv

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Reply #4 on: June 05, 2021, 11:26:27 am
I guess Photo D is fuel line then. Does B or C goes into E. Does that mean one will be open ?


viczena

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Reply #5 on: June 05, 2021, 02:34:38 pm
Totally useless conversion.
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jobinjv

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Reply #6 on: June 05, 2021, 04:52:26 pm
I wouldn’t totally say so. This bike is been with me since 2010, of the initial batch of C5 here in India.

The standard of the parts and production are way different on the export models and the one you get here.

Definitely they might have upped the game, but having got this I can’t sell it as such or spend a lot on a new EFI. They are pretty expensive.

The sensors are different and if u let it sit for few days or months as the quality of fuel deteriorate it needs a few kicks to start, sometimes a cleaning of the EFI itself. If I leave it with low fuel it’s the same story.

These batches really don’t like a low battery and a few days away really let’s it’s go low.

I usually am away for a few months before I ride again and every time I have those set of procedures which take days of my leave.

This time though it’s after 2 years I’m back to the bike.

So yeah I want a carefree bike that I can just start and ride of when I want.


Haggis

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Reply #7 on: June 05, 2021, 05:07:14 pm
B looks to be your float chamber drain.
You can drain the float chamber by opening the screw which is 90° from the drain pipe.

D will be your fuel supply.?

C looks like the float chamber breather pipe and would be left open.?

No idea,  where did  E come from or went to on the old system.?
Off route, recalculate?


viczena

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Reply #8 on: June 05, 2021, 05:12:16 pm
If you want a "carefree" bike, do something against the rusty tank. Either with a filter for the fuel pump, or by cleaning and preserving the inner part of the tank.

A shitty carb is not the right answer for shitty fuel. If you want to leave the bike for months, it would be advisable to empty the tank and disconnect the battery. Easy as it sounds.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2021, 05:17:42 pm by viczena »
www.enfieldtech.de
Harley CVO EGlide, Boss Hoss 502, BMW 1200 RT, Harley Panhead , Harley Davidson &Marlboro Man Bike BD2, Royal Enfield Trials, KTM EXC 500. And some more.


jobinjv

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Reply #9 on: June 05, 2021, 05:29:30 pm
I wouldn’t say my tank is rusty, as I haven’t seen any. And filter for the fuel pump, I’m not too sure it’s possible. Anyways it already has a filter in it.

Empty the tank Everytime is not such an easy solution.

Anyways the post was about the inlet. Shitty no shitty I think I’ll live with it for a while. As far as the conversion has gone so far it’s clearly not a undo able work if it ever needs to.

Thank you for the suggestions.


suitcasejefferson

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Reply #10 on: June 15, 2021, 06:05:39 pm
I did an EFI to carb conversion on my 2013 B5. It is anything but worthless. I did that conversion about 3 months after buying the bike new, and it has been on there ever since. The bike immediately ran several times better with the carb. It idles better, has much better throttle response, the midrange is much stronger, and it pulls much harder overall. With the EFI it was hesitating and wheezing like crazy. Obviously WAY too lean. Not only does it run perfectly now with just shy of 14K miles, but I have never had even the slightest problem with it. I installed the carb conversion in conjunction with an aftermarket exhaust. The carb turned out to be jetted perfectly for the exhaust. Plus I got rid of a bunch of failure prone electronic parts. I had no idea how accurate the fuel warning light was, and running out of gas will often destroy the super expensive fuel pump.

It has been my experience (and I have a lot of it, I have been a mechanic for 36 years) that a carbureted engine will always run better than an EFI engine, when both are working as they were designed to. Plus you have a simple mechanical device replacing a bunch of electronics. I just have serious issues with putting electronics on an internal combustion engine. It's supposed to be a MACHINE, not a computer.

It sounds like your issues may be with the conversion kit you used. I got mine from Hitchcocks in the UK, and it came with an Amal carburetor. It is a non CV carb, and is as simple as it gets. The carb went on without any problems. I did run into a problem attaching the throttle cable that came with the kit to the throttle on the bike. But since I have been working on bikes for 45 years, I had several boxes of parts from many different bikes, and I was able to dig through those and put together something that worked perfectly.

Had I not been able to convert the bike to a carb (that was my intention even before I bought it) and been stuck with that awful EFI, I would have sold the bike a long time ago.
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Ove

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Reply #11 on: June 15, 2021, 11:11:33 pm
Danger of going off topic... I'm also not a fan of EFI on bikes. Everything we complain of can be fixed, I'm fairly sure, but requires using more technology I wouldn't be able to repair.

I have a mk2 Amal on a Norton Commando. The fuelling is just exquisite.  No notchiness or binary on/off sensations. A feeling of being totally connected with the bike, brain to wrist to engine. To me, Efi set ups seem to have gotten worse as we go up the Euro numbers.

If I understood what I needed to disconnect and what I could take off and shove in a box, I'd be sorely tempted to switch out my EFI for an Amal. But, I'm not sure about all the sensors and what else the EFI and ECU interact with, including the impact of throwing codes on the ECU and lighting up the dash. So, I put up with a degree of notchiness on and off the throttle. But it's a shame new bikes are like this. That said, it's only caused me to get rid of one bike; a Kawasaki Z900RS. The fuelling on that was worse than irritating, at high revs on bends, rolling on the throttle felt a bit of a lottery, it was dangerous.


gizzo

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Reply #12 on: June 15, 2021, 11:27:29 pm
Staying off topic for another moment: Something I haven't seen, is there any standalone electronic ignition kits available for the UCE? If you're going to the trouble of changing to a carburettor,  it'd be nice to dump that computer as well, and eliminate it's sensors and wiring.
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stefano_musica

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Reply #13 on: June 16, 2021, 07:46:31 am
I thought I had initially seen a full kit that replaced the stator rotor and such. But I haven't seen one in a while.

Wouldn't it be great to have a kit where you rip out all the electronics and just have a set of points, a coil, a carby, and a spark plug. I still run points on my Beetle, and the engine is the most reliable part of the entire car. I have no issues regularly maintaining points with adjustment, lubrication and all.
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Ove

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Reply #14 on: June 16, 2021, 08:05:16 am
Steady on! I'm happy to have electronic ignition, provided the auto-advance curve has been built for the engine it's being used in.

On removing the ECU: Were the first UCE models EFI?