Author Topic: 1959 Indian Trailblazer  (Read 19828 times)

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oilypuddlefield

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Reply #105 on: January 10, 2023, 09:52:14 pm
According to a copy of an AMAL  ID reference, your carb...389/234 was actually outfitted for a US market 1966 BSA Thunderbolt 650.
The correct carb number for your Trail Blazer is- 389/16
Interestingly, they show as having the same bore size (1-1/8) just different jets and throttle slide cutaways
                                                                                                           Needle
                                                                          Bore Pilot Cutaway Main Jet  Position

389/234 BSA 650cc 1966; A65 Thunderbolt (USA) 1 1/8" 25     3.5     310 0.106   3
389/16 Indian 692cc 1958-60; Trailblazer Twin      1 1/8" 30     3.5     270 0.106   2

Theoretically, you could rebuild your carb with new parts to suit and take a chance. OR buy a new one from Burlen and save the gamble.


TonyVanda

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Reply #106 on: January 11, 2023, 04:46:12 am
Thanks for the info opf. I'll have a closer look at mine. Where is the best place to get parts from?
Regards
Tv
Aarrrgh, an oil drip!


oilypuddlefield

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Reply #107 on: January 11, 2023, 01:09:30 pm
Probably the best option for parts...
https://amalcarb.co.uk/monobloc-series.htm
Hitchcocks should have the correct bits as well.
Or prowl around on eBay.
One thing with old Amals, which you might already be aware of is, the mating flanges warp and can allow air to get past the O-ring.
I've always filed and sanded them flat.
Some brave souls have rigged up a contraption to draw them back flat by way of a T bolt affair run through the bore.
Try at your own risk !


TonyVanda

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Reply #108 on: January 21, 2023, 11:02:40 am
Dropped the crank at the crank grinders. Turns out we worked together 40 years ago (furniture retail business) so most of our conversation was about that. He reassured me my crank was in the right hands. He's still doing it after 40 years and reckons it's hard to retire because no-one does this stuff any more and none of the young blokes are interested. His mate does rebores so he's got the barrels and pistons so hopefully, wont be too long before I might be able to fit the short motor.

Got a long way to go yet. Learning something new every time I get something done.

Aarrrgh, an oil drip!


Adrian II

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Reply #109 on: January 21, 2023, 01:24:23 pm
Unfortunately these guys won't be around for ever, and it does need younger blood to carry this stuff on. Does your crank grinder want you as a mature apprentice? Assuming you're not already the same age as he is?

A.
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TonyVanda

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Reply #110 on: January 21, 2023, 09:05:14 pm
Naah Adrian, we are the same age. I wouldn't be looking to do an apprenticeship in that field anyway. I already get too much oil under my fingernails. Besides, for what he is charging, I'd just as sooner get him to do it.

The resto process is great fun and I learn stuff every day. I'd like to learn how to use a metal lathe one of these days. They look like a handy bit of kit.
Aarrrgh, an oil drip!


oilypuddlefield

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Reply #111 on: January 27, 2023, 01:10:30 pm
Stay away from metal lathes !They're only the beginning. Once you have learned that, then comes the milling machine.
Then you start collecting tools and gadgets so you can  make "stuff". And the smell of cutting oil will permeate your clothes.
After awhile, your shop will be the only place that makes sense !
Speaking from 40+ years as a self employed metal cutter.


Adrian II

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Reply #112 on: January 27, 2023, 01:18:28 pm
The clever thing for most of us to do is actually become good friends with a man in your position! (Says the man with no machinist buddies...)

A.
Grumpy Brit still seeking 500 AVL Bullet perfection! Will let you know if I get anywhere near...


TonyVanda

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Reply #113 on: February 16, 2023, 08:14:21 am
Ooo aah! The barrels have been bored and finished. Cant wait to pick them up. The crank grinder found one of the conrods was knackered so I've sourced another and will be taking that up next week. If he can make a good pair I can save a few bob.

Slowly coming together. The tinware has been on hold while I mess around with my Bullet 350 but it's well on the way too. I've scrounged a chain guard and a left side U-Shaped foot peg and a centre stand. Oh, and scored an adapter ring for the alternator too. Lucky they are a simple bike or I'd be doing it forever...

« Last Edit: February 16, 2023, 08:21:17 am by TonyVanda »
Aarrrgh, an oil drip!


TonyVanda

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Reply #114 on: March 21, 2023, 07:55:50 am
G'day All, my Magneto is done and on it's way down today. I've almost got everything ready to start reassemble but I've got some work to do on the cases. Before I start the process, I'm after some opinions.

I've got an article written on modifying the 700 twin to solve some oil pressure and breathing issues to eliminate oil leaks. It recommends 4 mods
1) make a hole in the roof of the oil tank on the timing chest side.
2) include an atmospheric breather (like the 250 Conti or the later Interceptors) on the top of the drive side case
3) modify where the oilway crosses the crank case joint to feed oil to the rockers (few options here)
4) block the oilway found in the cylinder face on the right hand crankcase.

These mods are somewhat summarized compared to the article. I'm interested to know if anyone has done this and if youse think it's worthwhile?

Regards
Tv
Aarrrgh, an oil drip!


Sandgroper

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Reply #115 on: March 28, 2023, 08:19:57 pm
G'day Tony,

I'll presume the article you are referring to is that published in the RE Owners Club magazine The Gun, No. 89, in November 1990. The mods described therein are all well-proven, but as is pointed out in the article, it is worth remembering that if originality is important, only some leave no external evidence. Some I've done, some not, but intend to as and when.

The oilway across the crankcase joint and the drillway in the cylinder base face are the cause of all sorts of strife - definitely sort those.

The big breather is worth doing, but obvious. If this matters, less visual would be to fit additional breathers in a pair of the rocker covers (Webco in the US actually made some like this back in the day) and also vent the oil tank into the timing case as per the article. I've also seen an additional small-bore breather taken from the oil filler neck.

If originality is not an issue, another mod I have seen is to fit a modern spin-on oil filter in the return circuit. As well as improving filtration, this increases capacity and cooling capability. Pipework for this can be plumbed via mods to the oil filler neck, or by rerouting the return pipe via compression fittings out of and returning to the oil tank top.

If your bike has got that awful 'tuning fork' head steady from the top rear of the heads to the fuel tank mount, it will be time well spent fabricating a replacement one-piece plate bolted to the top of the heads, tying the two heads together, and with a vertical extension fixed to a lug on the under-tank frame tube - think inverted T shape. Later bikes had a similar arrangement in the form of two L-shaped plates, but the one-piece mod stiffens the whole thing up and helps prevent crankcase joint chafing.

There's a bloke in NZ who has done pretty much all there is to do on RE's - he may be along in due course to impart a little Kiwi wisdom - he knows his stuff.


TonyVanda

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Reply #116 on: April 02, 2023, 11:09:53 am
Thanks for the heads up Sandgroper. Any info before I start assembling is much appreciated. I'm not that fussed on originality as the bike is a bitzer but any mods would be tastefully done if possible. At this stage I'm interested in getting a reliable engine together.

This week, I'm laying out the all the motor bits for contemplation...
REgards
Tv
Aarrrgh, an oil drip!


TonyVanda

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Reply #117 on: April 17, 2023, 07:32:07 am
1. Cleaning the yellow paint out of the inside of the engine cases. 
2. Cases boiled for an hour or so (on the BBQ) in a water/baking soda solution
3. High pressure washed and got most of the paint off. It was pretty soft
4. the cases were a bit stained because of the solution but still come up ok after a wire brush, some steel wool and some Autosol aluminium polish.
Aarrrgh, an oil drip!


TonyVanda

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Reply #118 on: April 17, 2023, 07:33:24 am
Here are more attachments.
Aarrrgh, an oil drip!


Adrian II

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Reply #119 on: April 17, 2023, 09:32:19 am
The yellow paint was there as a precaution against porous castings, will you be painting the inside of the cases with its modern equivalent, or leaving them bare? H's are out of stock but you might have a local equivalent.

https://accessories.hitchcocksmotorcycles.com/11922

A.

Grumpy Brit still seeking 500 AVL Bullet perfection! Will let you know if I get anywhere near...