Author Topic: 2019 Bullet B5 Rear Brake?  (Read 555 times)

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Narada

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Reply #15 on: September 10, 2019, 02:37:45 PM
The rear drum brake on my 2015 C5 works great... for a drum brake, it is what it is... It does not require much pressure to engage and will skid anytime, if that's what you want to do.  That being said, I test rode a 2019 last spring just so I could stand on the brakes and see what happened... As one would expect, the 2019 ABS bike with front and rear disc brakes, stopped noticeably quicker than my 2015 non-ABS with the stock disc / drum set-up.

It was also interesting to let go of a lifetime of knowing I had to manage rear brake pressure to avoid skidding, and just stomp the brake. It works well, but seems very unnatural, and to be quit honest, I don't like letting go of my own judgement and just becoming a mindless idiot stomping on the brakes. The ABS with rear disc stops better, it just creeps me out...  ???
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ROVERMAN

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Reply #16 on: September 10, 2019, 03:37:08 PM
 The rear drums on my 03' IB and my 2013 B5 always worked perfectly. Whereas the front calipers on the B5 required stripping, freeing up, and flushing after 2 seasons.
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AK Mike

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Reply #17 on: September 10, 2019, 09:30:27 PM
Thank you all for the replies.  Think I'm leaning more towards the disc, but I also see the advantages of the drum.  As always, there are compromises and nothing is perfect.  You all really helped to highlight those for me.

Of course, just when I was decided on getting a B5, just a couple days ago a lightly used Moto Guzzi V7 Special reared its pretty little head and now I'm torn.  I know they are two completely different beasts.  I'm going to check out the Guzzi tomorrow, but my heart is still with the Bullet.  Those Italian gals sure are head-turners though  ::)


Carlsberg Wordsworth

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Reply #18 on: September 10, 2019, 09:33:42 PM
It's that lower piston that I always find sticks the most (understandably as it's closest to the road) but at least it means regular maintenance to something that usually gets left alone.

Rear drum? Well it's ok I guess. I've never tried locking it. Also had a go at that centralising mod as well if memory serves.

I do like the Guzzi, shaft drive etc. It felt real comfy in the showroom. Never rode one though. Maybe one day lol


GlennF

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Reply #19 on: September 11, 2019, 12:01:13 AM
Thank you all for the replies.  Think I'm leaning more towards the disc, but I also see the advantages of the drum.  As always, there are compromises and nothing is perfect.  You all really helped to highlight those for me.

Of course, just when I was decided on getting a B5, just a couple days ago a lightly used Moto Guzzi V7 Special reared its pretty little head and now I'm torn.  I know they are two completely different beasts.  I'm going to check out the Guzzi tomorrow, but my heart is still with the Bullet.  Those Italian gals sure are head-turners though  ::)

The guzzi has a shaft. Back in the 80's I lived on the edge of what could loosely be termed the Australian "outback" near a major national park and a lot of my riding was on dirt and the roads regularly flooded.  I had two shaft drive bikes over that period a Kawasiaki GT550 and a bit later an XJ900. At that time a shaft drive was an absolute boon, I could cross flooded creeks and ride about on dirt all day and never have to worry about cleaning and lubricating the chain.  These days I basically ride to work across town when the weather is nice so a shaft drive is no longer essential for me.

The XJ900 was probably the most reliable bike I ever owned, it was still going fine 25 years later when I let it go because the tank had rusted out.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 12:04:41 AM by GlennF »


AK Mike

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Reply #20 on: September 13, 2019, 06:03:48 AM
I also just found out that the new 2019 B5 has an 18 inch rear wheel like the C5.  So I wonder... is this a good or bad thing?  For those with the older 19 inch rear wheel, do you think it has advantages over an 18 inch rear?

Thanks again


Richard230

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Reply #21 on: September 13, 2019, 01:59:02 PM
I also just found out that the new 2019 B5 has an 18 inch rear wheel like the C5.  So I wonder... is this a good or bad thing?  For those with the older 19 inch rear wheel, do you think it has advantages over an 18 inch rear?

Thanks again

I have no idea what difference that makes with the bike's handling.  ???  (I assume that there has been no change in the B5's chassis.)  However, I will comment that a larger wheel will roll over bumps a little smoother and will possibly make changing directions slightly less agile due to its larger size.  On the other hand (and perhaps the reason for the change), 18" diameter rear tires are a lot easier to source than 19" rear tires and therefore likely less expensive to purchase in bulk than one for a 19" wheel, especially when you are looking for a "low bidder" to "nickel and dime" your build costs.   ;)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


mike_bike_kite

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Reply #22 on: September 16, 2019, 09:40:55 AM
Well a disc brake is easier to maintain and will stop better, in my opinion. But a drum brake looks better, does not need its hydraulic fluid changed and is likely more resistant to sliding in the rain.  ???  Like everything, pros and cons, depending upon what floats your boat.   :)
The disk brakes definitely stop better, I took a newish C5 with a rear drum brakes out for a ride and I found the brakes a bit of a liability in busy city traffic. The same bike with disks at both ends actually had quite decent braking. The ABS found on the newer disk brakes should also stop the bike sliding in the rain as that's what ABS is designed for. The older drum brakes probably didn't slide simply because they didn't have enough braking power in the first place. I'd of thought maintenance on disk brakes is far easier than on drum - most folk don't do anything more than wash them every now and then. Looks wise - I guess that's up to the individual.
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AK Mike

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Reply #23 on: September 16, 2019, 06:38:58 PM
As always, I really appreciate everyone's input and the wealth of knowledge to be found here.

I'll be headed to Seattle in about a month, and think I'll take that opportunity to check out a B5 and probably a Himalayan at the dealer down there.  So I'm just trying to square in my mind now the things to look out for and consider.  I've also been tempted by Moto Guzzis lately, so I might take a closer look at them as well.

Thanks again.


GlennF

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Reply #24 on: September 17, 2019, 12:20:19 AM
As always, I really appreciate everyone's input and the wealth of knowledge to be found here.

I'll be headed to Seattle in about a month, and think I'll take that opportunity to check out a B5 and probably a Himalayan at the dealer down there.  So I'm just trying to square in my mind now the things to look out for and consider.  I've also been tempted by Moto Guzzis lately, so I might take a closer look at them as well.

Thanks again.

Generally speaking the Guzzi will be a better overall build quality but expect to pay a  50% premium.

Also the single cylinder B5 and Himalayan are a different class of bike altogether to the various 2019 Guzzi models.  In some ways the Interceptor is closer overall to the Guzzi range but currently lacks an adventure bike model equivalent to the V7 Rough/V85  TT or Himalayan.  There are rumours of an Adventure Interceptor being in the works but there is no sign of it appearing, even as a prototype, before 2020 at the earliest.

TBH ... if I was looking to replace my B5 with something bigger the Interceptor 650 and the Guzzi V7 rough would both be near the top of my short list.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2019, 12:29:49 AM by GlennF »


AK Mike

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Reply #25 on: September 17, 2019, 12:38:38 AM
Generally speaking the Guzzi will be a better overall build quality but expect to pay a  50% premium.

Also the single cylinder B5 and Himalayan are a different class of bike altogether to the various 2019 Guzzi models.  In some ways the Interceptor is closer overall to the Guzzi range but currently lacks an adventure bike model equivalent to the V7 Rough/V85  TT or Himalayan.  There are rumours of an Adventure Interceptor being in the works but there is no sign of it appearing, even as a prototype, before 2020 at the earliest.

TBH ... if I was looking to replace my B5 with something bigger the Interceptor 650 and the Guzzi V7 rough would both be near the top of my short list.
Thank you Glenn.  I know the RE 500s and the MGs are very different beasts, and I just need to decide what I'm really looking for.  I recently rode a used V7 so I have an idea of what they're all about, and I just have to decide what I want... I like both experiences, but don't think my budget can accommodate both.  So it'll be a tough decision.