Author Topic: 2019 Himalayan stalls whenever throttle is released completely, post mishap  (Read 133 times)

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linearB

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I have a 2019 Himalayan with about 400 and some odd miles on it. At 300 I replaced the filter and oil. I will admit I've been lazy and haven't yanked the tank and adjusted the valves yet.

Right from the get go, this bike seemed a little funny about stalling, but I mostly only noticed it when it was first on and I was trying to accelerate into first, and it was not frequent enough for me to think about too much.

Shortly after the 300 mile change, I got hung up in some mud in my woods, and ultimately had to set the bike at an angle in mud. It did not go over hard, in fact, the engine was still running and I had to shut it off. I had made an attempt to "when in doubt, throttle it out" but it was clear that was not going to be effective so I did not push the engine really hard.

Some friends came over quickly, we lifted the bike out, it fired up fine. I blasted all the mud off with a hose, using tools to knock out any that had caked anywhere, and then cleaned and re-lubed the chain. Everything was fine, and I believe I rode about 60 miles without noticing anything amiss.

Yesterday, I rode 30 miles and twice noticed that I stalled out coming into intersections.

Today, I rode 20 miles, and noticed that I stall out completely any time I completely let off the throttle. It doesn't matter if the clutch is down or not, or if the bike is in gear or neutral -- no throttle, instant stall. If this was a carbed bike, it would be behaving exactly like it needs to have the idle screw turned slightly.

I've been on the phone with Enfield, but my "local" dealer is ~200 miles away. I sent them these pictures and they are hopeful they might be able to talk me through this, their belief is that I've got a vacuum leak somewhere.

here are pictures that I sent them:
https://imgur.com/a/TYPBVvv

Any advice would be greatly appreciated; I can take pictures of whatever easily. I don't have much experience doing this kind of work, so ELI5 applies. If anyone can get me running smoothly again before the dealer straightens me out, I'll send you a pint of home made maple syrup from up here in the mountains :-P
« Last Edit: July 11, 2019, 02:09:39 pm by linearB »


mike_bike_kite

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I'll just start by saying I don't own a Himalayan. I suspect the EVAP canister got filled with fuel when you tipped the bike. This can lead to stalling due to a vacuum building up in the tank. Next time it stalls try opening the fuel cap to release the vacuum. Does it idle fine with the cap off? if so then you've found the issue. Personally though, I'd think about taking the bike in for it's first service and letting the garage sort it out.
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Dalmatian man

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I'll just start by saying I don't own a Himalayan. I suspect the EVAP canister got filled with fuel when you tipped the bike. This can lead to stalling due to a vacuum building up in the tank. Next time it stalls try opening the fuel cap to release the vacuum. Does it idle fine with the cap off? if so then you've found the issue. Personally though, I'd think about taking the bike in for it's first service and letting the garage sort it out.

Failing that their is a idle adjustment screw on top of the throttle body, large brass colour  screw,  a slight turn anti clockwise will increase the tick over speed.
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linearB

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Thanks for the information! Some looking at the service manual, and videos, got me out there tracing tubes and stuff, and the bike seems to be running normally again after doing the following:
* disconnecting and reconnecting the electrical plugs in the vicinity of the throttle body
* opening and closing the gas tank
* tracing the gas tank vent line and re-running it to make sure it was free of any kinks

I would like the garage to see the bike soon, but they are a few hour haul for me, and since I'll be going through there in a month anyway I'm going to try to get up to 1200 miles to get to the second service point and get that done.
I'm most suspicious of the third thing; when the bike went down in the mud, I did a real thorough job cleaning it all out with a hose before I re-lubed the chain, and I wasn't aware that the tank vent to atmosphere was dangling there; I "found" it right in the mix of everything I'd blasted clean, so it seems possible I had it pinched or wrapped in the frame.

In any case, after doing all that, I had it running at idle in N, 1 & 2 no problem up on its stand, and then I went and rode a half mile doing all the things that were provoking hard stalls 100% of the time yesterday, and was unable to get it to die. I will go for a longer ride tonight or tomorrow.


linearB

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Well, I am still diagnosing this. Since I rerouted the evap hose, problem is not as bad, but still happens. When it does, if I crack the tank and futz with the hose, then it will be fine again for a while.

I guess I need to take the tank off to make sure there's no hidden crimp there (unlikely, I can suck gas-smelling air through it), and then also take the EVAP system on the lower panel under the engine apart and clean it out per some videos I've seen?


Arizoni

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If taking the filler cap off and then putting it back on fixes the problem like you say it does then there is a problem with your filler cap.
It's vent isn't working like it should.

If your filler cap is one of the non-vented kinds like the one on my California version of the G5 and it uses a charcoal canister on it to control the emissions, the canister is plugged up with something.
The only way air can get into the fuel tank to replace the fuel as the engine burns it is thru the cap vent or thru the charcoal canister.
If no air gets into the tank to replace the burned fuel it forms a vacuum in the tank.  That vacuum will keep the fuel pump (or gravity drain on a bike with a carburetor) from supplying fuel to the engine.
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Richard230

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One of the first things that I did with my 2011 B5 was to remove the entire charcoal canister system and vent the tank to the atmosphere with a small K&N filter on the end of the vent tube to keep the bugs out of the tank.  :)
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