Author Topic: Prototypes  (Read 147 times)

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vintage keith

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on: May 27, 2019, 02:51:52 pm
Just been trawling this section, and noticed a couple of entries entitled 'Prototypes'.
Thought folks might like to see this prototype (which is still a project, albeit progressing slowly).
It was constructed in 1912, one of a very small batch (possibly only 2), and contained Enfield's FIRST engine of their own manufacture.
Bert Colver rode a similar machine at Brooklands, and appears on the inside front cover of Peter Hartley's 1980s book, The Story of Royal Enfield Motorcycles. Unfortunately, my machine is not Bert's (note the different steering head angle), but carries engine no. 2, so maybe Bert's was no. 1? The bike has an overhead inlet, side exhaust valve layout, with aluminium pistons, roller bearings throughout, high mounted magneto, and lead loaded flywheels for extra torque. Enfield 2 speed gear, and what I believe to be a prototype rear hub cush drive with screw on cush drum.
If old stuff like this interests you, try a visit to http://vinvetmotorcycle.simplesite.com/432420583 where I'm recording the rebuild process, along with other Enfield stuff (1912 model 160, 1937 KX and 1957 500 Bullet - last one owned for 43 years). Warning: non Enfield content on there also!


Dantheman

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Reply #1 on: June 10, 2019, 10:27:59 am
Nice project! Its interesting to see how the tanks are separated in that way instead of a one piece unit. Its funny you post the photo with the reg "AB1483" on a 1911 bike in your blog, I have another photo showing this same reg fitted to an early 3hp machine from 1913!


vintage keith

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Reply #2 on: June 11, 2019, 01:30:30 pm
Hi Dan
I think Enfield, like many other manufacturers at the time worked fast and loose with the taxation system!
I have seen photos of at least 4 different Enfields with that registration number.
I have yet to decide what to do with the magneto drive chain, once the bike goes back together - it seems a bit close to the family jewels!
Maybe a clear acrylic cover would be an idea - the chain would still be visible thrashing around, as long as I don't over lube things.


Adrian II

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Reply #3 on: June 11, 2019, 01:54:07 pm
Something period-looking in cast alloy would suit better than acrylic. An alloy fuel tank maker could perhaps weld something up out of 16 gauge/1.5mm alumin(i)um sheet, all with nicely rounded corners of course.

A.
Grumpy Brit still seeking 500 AVL Bullet perfection! Will let you know if I get anywhere near...