Author Topic: Liqui Moly engine oil  (Read 219 times)

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Roshiba777

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on: May 16, 2019, 10:03:15 pm
Hey guys come to know about liqui moly engine oil planning to give it a try on my interceptor 650 as it has already run 2200 kms after 1st service at 500 kms earlier using the Royal enfields genuine liquid gun fully synthetic oil.

So please suggest should I give try to liqui moly 10W-50 fully synthetic or go with the Motul 300V double ester fully synthetic really very confused will be changing engine oil at every 5000.kms opposite to 10000 kms oil change interval as suggested by RE.

Any pros and cons of both liqui moly and motul 300V please suggest  have used motul 300v in my chrome 500 but didnt feel much change in smoothness or refinement
Royal Enfield CI 500 (2000)
Royal Enfield STD UCE 500 (2010)
Royal Enfield Classic 500 (2011)
Royal Enfield Classic Chrome 500 (2011)
Yamaha RD350 (1988)
Royal Enfield Interceptor 650 (2019)


Richard230

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Reply #1 on: May 17, 2019, 08:13:51 am
Personally, after owning 45 motorcycles, I have come to the conclusion that pretty much any oil that is rated to conform to the vehicle manufacturer's specifications will be just fine for our motorcycles. The oil blenders are full of it when it comes to their claims, especially when someone changes their oil twice as often as recommended by the vehicle manufacturer. It is all "snake oil" that attempts to get you to pay a lot for what they likely sell to car buyers for 1/3 as much.

A good example is fully-synthetic BMW-brand 5W-40 oil in the U.S. It is made by Shell from natural gas and is sold by BMW for around $17 a liter. But you can buy the same oil, with the same specifications, by buying Shell Rotella T6 on sale for $20 a 4-liter jug.  I have been using Shell Rotella 15W-40 "conventional" oil for many years in my 2002 125hp Yamaha FZ1. It still runs like a clock and has never even needed a single adjustment of its 20 valves since it left the factory - thank god.

If anyone can prove that one oil is better for their motorcycle than any other oil, except when exposed to extreme high or low temperatures or extended drain intervals, I would like to hear about it. I doubt that any owner can tell the difference between one oil or another, except in their own mind, which has been convinced by advertising claims. 

Here in the U.S. many people swear that synthetic Amsoil is better than any other oil and are willing to pay a premium for the privilege for using it.   ::)

Anyway, to answer your question, Liqui Moly is a fine (but expensive) oil and I am sure that you and your Interceptor will be happy using it.

2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Dr Mayhem

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Reply #2 on: May 17, 2019, 08:25:01 am
I'm under the impression that all dedicated motorcycle oils are different from non-motorcycle oils in that they have friction modifiers to prevent/help prevent clutch slippage.

This will be the first motorcycle I've ever owned where the clutch, transmission and engine are all lubed from the same oil supply so I can't give you anything from experience

Isn't moly's claim to fame is that it's extra slippery?
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Guaire

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Reply #3 on: May 17, 2019, 08:42:30 am
Whatever you use must be JASO rated (for motorcycle clutches), read the info on the oil can/container.

Liqui Moly has been in use as an additive, used mostly by BMW riders. I drained the Liqui Moly out of my 1994 BMW K75. It was absolutely gooey. The product took hold years ago on BMW R series, Airheads, as an additive to use with conventional oil. My K bike had a high pitch whine to the motor. The heavy, black moly was also in use in the transmission and rear drive.

My K bike is running Shell motorcycle oil, 10w40, full synthetic. It is running much quieter now.

On both my C5 and my Continental GT, I run Shell full synthetic motorcycle oil, 15w50. This oil is what Ducati recommends for their bikes.

The Liqui Moly came out of a time when BMW riders wanted to help add lubricative properties to conventional oil. For my bikes, I don't see the point of using it.
  Every time I have switched from conventional oil, with or without moly, the engine is noticeably quieter. With my BMW, I also put in new spark plugs at the same time as the switch to full synth. The were not bad, but I switched from Bosch to NGK. Quieter motor, slightly improved mileage.
  I don't see the point of using an additive to the oil I'm running in my Royal Enfields.
Bill
ACE Motors - sales & administration


Richard230

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Reply #4 on: May 17, 2019, 08:44:50 am
If the oil is rated MA or MA2 by JASO then it doesn't contain friction modifiers that might cause clutch slippage. At least that was the excuse for their clutches slipping around the turn of the century by some Japanese motorcycle manufacturers.  However I never had that problem with any of my motorcycles that used an oil bath clutch when using car oil in the past. (In those days there was no such thing as motorcycle-specific oil. Most of us used 20W-50 Castrol GTX oil.)  Not even on my 1977 Honda CB550K, in which I used ARCO Graphite oil - until it was removed from the market due to poor sales as the stuff was completely black when new due to all of the graphite dumped into the oil. The public just couldn't deal with a new oil that looked like very old oil when poured out of the can. So that ended that oil experiment.  :(
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Richard230

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Reply #5 on: May 17, 2019, 08:47:15 am
Whatever you use must be JASO rated (for motorcycle clutches), read the info on the oil can/container.

Liqui Moly has been in use as an additive, used mostly by BMW riders. I drained the Liqui Moly out of my 1994 BMW K75. It was absolutely gooey. The product took hold years ago on BMW R series, Airheads, as an additive to use with conventional oil. My K bike had a high pitch whine to the motor. The heavy, black moly was also in use in the transmission and rear drive.

My K bike is running Shell motorcycle oil, 10w40, full synthetic. It is running much quieter now.

On both my C5 and my Continental GT, I run Shell full synthetic motorcycle oil, 15w50. This oil is what Ducati recommends for their bikes.

The Liqui Moly came out of a time when BMW riders wanted to help add lubricative properties to conventional oil. For my bikes, I don't see the point of using it.
  Every time I have switched from conventional oil, with or without moly, the engine is noticeably quieter. With my BMW, I also put in new spark plugs at the same time as the switch to full synth. The were not bad, but I switched from Bosch to NGK. Quieter motor, slightly improved mileage.
  I don't see the point of using an additive to the oil I'm running in my Royal Enfields.
Bill

My understanding that Liqui Moly is now just another high-priced brand that sells all sorts of oils and lubricants.  It is no longer just the name of an gooey anti-friction additive.
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Dr Mayhem

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Reply #6 on: May 17, 2019, 08:59:04 am
I've been a Mobil1 user for long as I can remember in my bikes, so when they came out with their new motorcycle oil I called them. It was a engineer there who explained to me about the friction modifiers in the new motorcycle oil for clutches.

Long story short, I asked him what he used in his Harley and he said the 15W-50 car stuff
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Dr Mayhem

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Dr Mayhem

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Reply #8 on: May 17, 2019, 10:47:45 am
I hadn't previously given this subject any deep thought because it wasn't relevant to anything I owned.

But, after some reading now I've decided that it will be the same Mobil1 full synthetic 15w-50 oil in my bike that I've always used. I'll deal with whatever

clutch issues that may or may not arise in a totally different manner  ;D
« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 12:11:32 pm by Dr Mayhem »
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chuychacon

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Reply #9 on: May 17, 2019, 07:23:09 pm
I have been using Mobil 1 15-50 red top  for 10 years in motorcycles, just used last of cases and switched to Mobil 1 v twin
but in a  RE you could use almost anything ,right!

wow oil talk so rare !
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Dr Mayhem

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Reply #10 on: May 17, 2019, 09:36:48 pm
I have been using Mobil 1 15-50 red top  for 10 years in motorcycles, just used last of cases and switched to Mobil 1 v twin
but in a  RE you could use almost anything ,right!

wow oil talk so rare !

man, wasn't it over a decade ago since an that was replaced by the gold top?

IIRC the gold top wasn't to have as much zinc in it so I hoarded a bunch of the red top for the Brit bikes  ;)
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