Author Topic: Nail in back tyre :(  (Read 240 times)

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mike_bike_kite

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on: March 03, 2019, 11:47:22 am
I'm fairly used to fixing tyres punctures on other bikes but wondered how it's done on the Enfield with it's tubed tyres?
Also, was I OK to ride the bike a few miles home?
Is there a heavy duty inner tube I can get? cost?

Mike
2018 Pegasus + NC750X + Vespa GT & GTS


johno

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Reply #1 on: March 03, 2019, 02:41:15 pm
It's best to get a new inner tube and closely inspect the tyre, the tyre would normally be ok to continue using
 You can patch the inner tube like you do with a bicycle tyre.
check nothing sharp is left inside the tyre.
if the hole is large in the tyre you can put a patch inside, but no real need.
riding may have ripped the inner-tube more than the nail did!
2012 B5 Bullet
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mike_bike_kite

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Reply #2 on: March 03, 2019, 03:06:37 pm
Thanks. Will do.
2018 Pegasus + NC750X + Vespa GT & GTS


9fingers

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Reply #3 on: March 03, 2019, 03:45:57 pm
I had the same thing happen when I had only 300 miles on the bike. I rode in 1st gear at less than 5mph and every few minutes stopped to let the tire cool, as I was afraid to damage it. I was about 5 miles from home. Just in case I had a friend pick me up with his trailer. The place that repaired the flat told me I had not done any damage to the tire. Cool having spokes but a real PIA to fix a flat. But a Classic would look pretty stupid with tubeless, modern rims. The things we put up with...............
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Mad4Bullets

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Reply #4 on: March 03, 2019, 04:36:28 pm
Getting the front or back tire off your RE isn't really that difficult and it's a good skill to know. Unless you're skilled at fixing punctures, it's probably in your best interest to invest in a pair of long handled tire spoons for increased leverage.  The short spoons in the tool kit can be challenging.  There is an alternative though.  Remove the rear wheel and take it to your RE dealer or a bike shop to fit a new tube and reinstall the tire.  It will cost you a bit more but you'll be back on the road faster if you're somewhat inexperienced.  If you go this route be sure to check the tire pressure before riding.  The dealer may have over-inflated to seat the tube. Lots of good videos on YouTube showing how the get the rear wheel off.  I've attached a link for you. It's a video for inspecting your rear brake drums but it clearly shows you how to remove the rear wheel.  It's not all that difficult and it's a great opportunity for you to learn about the unique RE design where the drive sprocket and brake assembly stay attached to the swingarm when you remove the wheel.  Give it a try.  You can do it, and if you get lost we're all here to help you.

https://youtu.be/PFiRQ7fcSYQ


hpwaco

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Reply #5 on: March 03, 2019, 05:17:44 pm
Picked up 2 nails in the rear tire of my 01 Bonneville ( tube type spoke wheel ) within the first 1000 miles.   Made it home with stops for air and riding slow.   Without a center stand, removing the rear wheel was a hassle.  A couple of pieces of 4 x 4's, long handle tire irons, a bead "stop" clamp and valve stem "puller" tool made the job easier, but not fun!
 


Bilgemaster

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Reply #6 on: March 03, 2019, 07:20:22 pm
I recently changed the tires on my Iron Belly. It's never a lot of fun, but at least the rear wheel came off nicely without having to fuss around with the brake hub and such, as one must often do with other bikes. It can just stay in place. You just remove the outermost crown nut. Mine had a sort of retaining cotter pin. The larger inner crown nut just stays in place. You can patch the tube or just get a new one from Bike Bandit. They're not expensive. You normally needn't worry about patching or plugging the tire for most small punctures.
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.