Author Topic: Smiths Digital Chronometric Speedometer Installation Help?  (Read 2306 times)

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Dave1

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Hi Everybody

I have a Smiths Chronometric Digital Speedometer, which I'm trying to figure out the best way to install on my 2004 Royal Enfield 500 ES with ES removed.

I have the Smiths instructions, but when I look at it, I wonder if there must be a better way for us Royal Enfield riders..The reason I say this is because the standard speedometer that came with the bike has a bunch of wires that comes from the speedometer to a block connector that connects to another block connector that is connected the main wiring loom. There must be a way of retaining the use of the block connector that connects into the wiring loom?


If anybody else has wired this Speedometer into a Iron Barrelled bullet, I'm all ears as to how you did it?

Here are the  instructions and wiring diagrams from Smiths. I've also included the correct wiring diagram from Pete Snidals manual for a 2004 500cc Bullet ES.


solg

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Reply #1 on: February 21, 2019, 03:09:18 PM
I have a 2008 Iron Barrel. I swapped the original speedo with a Smiths digital. Its a very nice instrument, top notch! As I recall the original only had 2 wires going to it for the instrument light. I didn't use the original connector. I found it easie,r and cleaner' to work with bullet connectors. I also have a ground wire running directly from the battery to inside the headlight housing. (I use this for a few things) The Smiths brown wire (the grounding wire used for programing, and toggling from trip meter to odometer is now hooked up to a momentary switch drilled into the side of the casque. (For convenience) I also ordered the speedo with a flanged trim ring and an under mount bracket. It fits like the original.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2019, 03:49:15 PM by solg »
The computer can't tell you the emotional story. It can give you the exact mathematical design, but what's missing is the eyebrows. FZ


solg

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Reply #2 on: February 21, 2019, 03:48:06 PM
another view
The computer can't tell you the emotional story. It can give you the exact mathematical design, but what's missing is the eyebrows. FZ


Stanley

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Reply #3 on: February 21, 2019, 04:41:46 PM
That looks perfect!  Those panel lights look original as useful.


Carlsberg Wordsworth

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Reply #4 on: February 21, 2019, 09:50:56 PM
Loving that mini tach Solg. Is that the German made one? The name escapes me atm.


solg

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Reply #5 on: February 21, 2019, 11:45:53 PM
Thanks.yes thats the german tach. MMB is the company name. I could have gone with an 8k rpm tach but the 6k suits me better.
The computer can't tell you the emotional story. It can give you the exact mathematical design, but what's missing is the eyebrows. FZ


Dave1

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Reply #6 on: June 30, 2019, 04:58:32 PM
Hi, thanks for the help. It was fitted to my bike, but for some reason it developed this weird problem of when I used the indicators it would switch the speedometer back on and off. I checked and double checked the wiring, all was fine there. So I reverted the bike back to an analogue speedometer, all is fine now.