Author Topic: New twin engine capacity  (Read 867 times)

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Oldie but Goldie

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on: October 09, 2018, 11:56:20 am
I was wondering if RE will increase the  CC size of their new engine as Triumph 795-》865 or Kawasaki 676-》773 did...

What do you think guys?
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Richard230

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Reply #1 on: October 09, 2018, 04:33:33 pm
I think they need to actually manufacture production models and start selling them first, before they start thinking about plans for another new model.  ::)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


9fingers

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Reply #2 on: October 26, 2018, 12:47:10 pm
I think they are plenty busy selling Himalayans, 500 Bullits, and expect them to be buys making 650s. Not sure they actually WANT to compete with Triumph and other companies.
Of course, with BSA coming back with some serious engineering and money behind them, RE might be forced to do things it would rather not.
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Kevin Mahoney

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Reply #3 on: February 17, 2019, 12:29:09 pm
RE is playing catch up when it comes to new models. I stood in front of a new color and proclaimed it a new model for well over a decade. The Twin was promised to me directly by the then CEO in 1999. The original UCE engine was designed to grow sideways into a Twin. First saw it in about 2000. I do suspect that the 500 will disappear in the US due to lack of sales once the twin arrives - I am prepared to be wrong.

RE has invested a staggering amount of money into new model development and I think it will payoff. Until a company has a full model line a dealer cannot make a living on just RE at least in the US. They are marching toward that rapidly. As long as their growth continues they will have unlimited cash to fund research. Beyond that Siddartha was born with a silver spoon in his mouth and is a serious multi millionaire and his family are billionaires. . He has money to invest if the cash flow of RE ever weakens, The company is very secure
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Richard230

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Reply #4 on: February 17, 2019, 04:37:07 pm
Almost every time that I park my B5 somewhere, I get accosted by someone who says that it is one of the nicest bikes they have ever seen and then they ask how old is it.  That just happened today during a visit to my local hardware store.  :)

So I still think there is some life left in the classic singles, RE just needs to advertise them more, in addition to the twins, of course.   ;)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Kevin Mahoney

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Reply #5 on: February 17, 2019, 05:48:29 pm
I agree about the B5. I NEVER had a frame break or crack on a B5 or any of the iron barrels. Beautiful bike
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GlennF

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Reply #6 on: February 17, 2019, 08:18:41 pm
The only issue I have with my B5 (now it has real tires and shocks) is the very ordinary rear drum brake.

However that issue is now fixed as it seems the newer UCEs are getting rear disks these days.