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Author Topic: Power Commander V fuel map questions  (Read 451 times)

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KD5ITM

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on: September 29, 2018, 05:46:25 pm
To my understanding, when looking at the stock fuel map that comes with the Power Commander 5, across the top you have your throttle positions and going down the side is your RPM range. To my understanding, each number is the percentage amount of fuel that is being added to the stock fuel settings that come from the Royal Enfield Factory when the bike is being programmed.

Is this a correct way of looking at the map? For example if I wanted to add 10% fuel at idle then at a thousand RPMs at 0% throttle I would at a 10 in place of the zero which would be 10% fuel added?

The film app that comes with Power Commander V, the way it's set up, is that a decent setup or does it require modifications? In other words, with the added free flow Muffler, is that stock Power Commander fuel map adequate enough or does it require adding more fuel to compensate for the free flow Muffler?

On a cold idle my bike frijole stalls several times before fully warmed up. And when cracking the throttle from at 0% when taking off from a stop light, the bike has a tendency quite often do you want to stumble if not to completely stall. Or if I'm downshifting and have the clutch pulled in and the throttle back at 0%, once I start to roll back on the throttle and let out the clutch, my GT sometimes I and either try to stop or will completely stall.

I'm at the point where I'm wondering if the bike is just too lean. Sometimes on a long ride maybe once or twice when you let off the throttle and let the engine compression slow the bike down before pulling the clutch in, it will backfire. A backfire is a classic sign that you're running lean.

My next thing to do is pull the spark plug and see what it looks like.

Any thoughts?
2014 Continental GT - red
1979 Hurst/Olds W-30 - whit and gold
1964 Volvo PV544 - desert sand
1961 Willys Jeep Utility Wagon - saturn yellow
2014 Trek Madone 5.9
2013 Specialized Carve Pro


gizzo

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Reply #1 on: September 30, 2018, 01:44:10 am
Mine hasn't ever stalled once since I fitted the PC V. I have fooled around with the tune a bit to suit my bike though. Can't remember exactly what, whether I've added fuel or removed it from various places, and slightly changed some timing settings. It runs well. Happy to post a screenshot of my setup if you're interested. I've retarded the inlet cam and skimmed the barrel so my settings might not quite suit yours.
simon from south Australia
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Pantah
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Good Vibes

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Reply #2 on: November 06, 2018, 07:41:49 pm
Hello KD5ITM
I read somewhere that your bike is a 2014 model.  I bought my red Conti GT new in 2014 and experienced the problems you describe. these are the things I have done to make my bike run perfectly and never stall either on opening throttle or when at idle. 

1. check fuel line between fuel tank for a kink.  It is almost certain to be kinked if an original 2014 bike. I removed kink be feeding existing hose through a close fitting coil spring. Now fuel supply is un-restricted.

2.  My New Zealand dealer sent my ECU back to Royal Enfield in India who re-mapped it - I think to run richer because as factory set to comply with strict emission standards, they are too lean.

That's all.  Today, 4 years later, with same original ECU, it still runs perfectly with powerful acceleration, no idle stalling or throttle opening issues of any kind.  Just pure good fun.

Good luck.
   
Ralph from New Zealand

GT Continental 535
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Type H

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Reply #3 on: November 07, 2018, 05:54:02 pm
This is the problem with the supplied maps...they're not for your bike, they're for the "average" or "ideal" bike of that type.

Do yourself a favour and take the bike down to your local tuner - you'll be surprised at the difference between just fiddling with the numbers yourself (as I had been), versus someone tuning on a dyno.


gashousegorilla

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Reply #4 on: November 07, 2018, 08:02:21 pm
To my understanding, when looking at the stock fuel map that comes with the Power Commander 5, across the top you have your throttle positions and going down the side is your RPM range. To my understanding, each number is the percentage amount of fuel that is being added to the stock fuel settings that come from the Royal Enfield Factory when the bike is being programmed.

Is this a correct way of looking at the map? For example if I wanted to add 10% fuel at idle then at a thousand RPMs at 0% throttle I would at a 10 in place of the zero which would be 10% fuel added?

Any thoughts?

   Yes , that is how it works.   When you put in a "10"  that would be ten percent more rich.  If you put in a "-10" , THAT  would be ten percent LESS rich.   The numbers you see on the fuel table on your PC-V software on your computer.... the numbers in that pre-installed map you have ,  are a percentage  AIR FUEL RATIO change  from when it was stock.   So if you see a "10" in one of those little boxes, that means that they made the  AIR FUEL RATIO ten percent more rich ...... 

For example :

  The person tuning the bike holds the throttle  at a given throttle position and a given RPM.....  lets just say for example at the box the intersects at 40 % throttle and 4000 rpms.... and that person tuning the bike is looking to get the air fuel ratio from 14.7:1  to 13.4:1.  Then they wind up adding around 10 percent .

 If you see a "0" anywhere in those boxes  , that means no change from stock.    Either the air fuel ratio was OK there ... or was OK as far as the tuner was concerned and within what he was looking for.     OR... he didn't tune in that box where the throttle position and rpm intersect  at all.    At zero percent throttle , from 500 rpm's up to 1750 rpms it's not very common to see changes there.  Unless there is more radical changes to the motor.   But they normally leave that area alone and left to the factory settings....That area is start up and idle.  If that area is tuned wrong ?   You will have problems with start up and idle or returning to idle , particularly before the motor is warmed up.  Or if it is really bad ?... even after it's warmed up.

 
« Last Edit: November 07, 2018, 08:24:13 pm by gashousegorilla »
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KD5ITM

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Reply #5 on: November 18, 2018, 09:44:26 pm
From a cold idle all the way up to a warm idle I bumped it from 0 to 12% fuel. It has made a difference with the bike stalling on a cold idle or after the bike has been sitting for a couple of hours and the engine has cooled down a bit. I may end up bumping that down to 10% and see what that does.
2014 Continental GT - red
1979 Hurst/Olds W-30 - whit and gold
1964 Volvo PV544 - desert sand
1961 Willys Jeep Utility Wagon - saturn yellow
2014 Trek Madone 5.9
2013 Specialized Carve Pro