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Author Topic: Himalayan Comparison Test  (Read 1684 times)

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Merrill

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Reply #15 on: August 13, 2018, 08:34:32 pm
Richard ,  I enjoyed the review,  but saying the Himalayan can run 80-85 , is not realistic .  At 700 miles I began riding my machine in a manner that would keep pace with traffic.  Seed limits ranged from 50 to 65 .   A good head wind will hold the bike between 60 - 65 at near full throttle.  If capable of 85 ( which I doubt) it would take a long time to reach that speed and letting off the throttle would require a long stretch to regain such speed.   Realistically the bikes are 70 to 75 top speed .  And that is what people should be told .   I enjoyed the article, but reading that the Himmy could cruise at 80/85   Tainted All that was said....
Keep it real.


Richard230

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Reply #16 on: August 14, 2018, 08:31:02 am
Richard ,  I enjoyed the review,  but saying the Himalayan can run 80-85 , is not realistic .  At 700 miles I began riding my machine in a manner that would keep pace with traffic.  Seed limits ranged from 50 to 65 .   A good head wind will hold the bike between 60 - 65 at near full throttle.  If capable of 85 ( which I doubt) it would take a long time to reach that speed and letting off the throttle would require a long stretch to regain such speed.   Realistically the bikes are 70 to 75 top speed .  And that is what people should be told .   I enjoyed the article, but reading that the Himmy could cruise at 80/85   Tainted All that was said....
Keep it real.

And here we go again:  The September/October issue of Motorcyclist magazine has an 8-page article, starting on page 56, about someone riding a Royal Enfield Himalayan off-road in the desert, to and into a mine located in southeastern California. Frankly, the article doesn't provide a lot of text, mostly large photos, although it does include the usual general description of the Himalayan. This includes a comment that the bike produces 24 hp and that the rider was able to ride the bike on Highway 395 "at its top speed of 85 mph for hours". So what can I say?  Now we have that claim from two professional motorcycle reviewers about the bike being able to run at 85 mph for hours.  Kind of makes you wonder if the SoCa magazine reviewers of the Himalayan are either lying or have been given a "ringer" by RE?   :o 

If you want to read this article, I recommend checking it out at a book store or large magazine stand. Reading it and looking at the pretty pictures should only take you about 5 minutes. Frankly, if you are looking for information about a motorcycle, this is not the magazine for you.  It is all "fluff". I am getting this publication because I had a subscription that extends to 2020 when they converted from my favorite monthly magazine into a tabletop version that is only distributed every couple of months. Motorcyclist magazine now contains a lot of large-format photos, but little informative text. Plus, the newsstand per-issue price has been doubled to something like $12 an issue. :(
« Last Edit: August 14, 2018, 08:46:41 am by Richard230 »
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Morgan60

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Reply #17 on: August 14, 2018, 10:44:27 am
Morgan I purchased one from big twin in Boise around the 1st of this month.  At 750 miles the EMS light came on.  Took it back to Boise.  It’s been there 3 weeks now.   I like the dealer . I like the bike. Just hope things work out okay.   I’m in the center of wa. St. Moses Lake,  six hours to Boise one way.  For me it’s a day down , and a day back.... the bike is  terrific  To ride.    I’m choosing to stay positive  through this ordeal  ...
Also the bike won’t idle for any length of time

Sorry to hear of the three weeks no bike. I have a new 500 Pegasus Edition on order from them only because I was told each dealer only got one bike and my buddy beat me to the punch here in Portland. I think I’d be calling the toll free number to RENA to ask if they can give your dealer some technical help to get you back on the road as these are new bikes to the US and still is in the leaning curve.

I feel you pain.🤕 Moto Guzzi used to be my main ride and I had take it to the north side of Seattle for service. Hang in their the Himmy is a awesome bike.
2008 Bullet Electra Gray
2010 Bullet G5 Deluxe Black
2018 Himalayan White
2018 Pegasus Brown on order


ace.cafe

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Reply #18 on: August 14, 2018, 03:23:20 pm
I suspect that the reviewers are reporting the INDICATED speeds that they see on the speedo.

Regardless, riding at top speed for a large percentage of a bikes life, just because it didn't die the first time on the road test, is folly.

Not recommended.


Richard230

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Reply #19 on: August 14, 2018, 04:40:32 pm
I suspect that the reviewers are reporting the INDICATED speeds that they see on the speedo.

Regardless, riding at top speed for a large percentage of a bikes life, just because it didn't die the first time on the road test, is folly.

Not recommended.

But something that motorcycle reviewers like to do. After all they didn't pay for the vehicle and feel that their job is to see if it will last a month under rent-a-car conditions.  ::)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


voodoochild

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Reply #20 on: August 14, 2018, 08:27:58 pm
And here we go again:  The September/October issue of Motorcyclist magazine has an 8-page article, starting on page 56, about someone riding a Royal Enfield Himalayan off-road in the desert, to and into a mine located in southeastern California. Frankly, the article doesn't provide a lot of text, mostly large photos, although it does include the usual general description of the Himalayan. This includes a comment that the bike produces 24 hp and that the rider was able to ride the bike on Highway 395 "at its top speed of 85 mph for hours". So what can I say?  Now we have that claim from two professional motorcycle reviewers about the bike being able to run at 85 mph for hours.  Kind of makes you wonder if the SoCa magazine reviewers of the Himalayan are either lying or have been given a "ringer" by RE?   :o 

If you want to read this article, I recommend checking it out at a book store or large magazine stand. Reading it and looking at the pretty pictures should only take you about 5 minutes. Frankly, if you are looking for information about a motorcycle, this is not the magazine for you.  It is all "fluff". I am getting this publication because I had a subscription that extends to 2020 when they converted from my favorite monthly magazine into a tabletop version that is only distributed every couple of months. Motorcyclist magazine now contains a lot of large-format photos, but little informative text. Plus, the newsstand per-issue price has been doubled to something like $12 an issue. :(

I believe the specific article you're referring to is by Abhi Eswarappa of Bike-Urious. He has now released it on his website here: https://www.bike-urious.com/bike-review-2018-royal-enfield-himalayan/

"...Leaving Los Angeles with the goal of achieving solitude typically requires a few hours of droning on the highway, and this trip will be no different. Reward Mine is 225 miles away from my front door, and all but 8 of those miles will be on pavement, usually with a speed limit above 65. This is going to be the tedious part of the journey, but I have to suffer through it to get to the good stuff. At sea level on flat ground, the Himalayan is content to cruise at 75 miles per hour, and I don’t have anything to complain about.
...It may not be a huge difference, and it’s definitely not a RE-specific problem, but as I’m trying to ride uphill fighting a headwind at elevation, I can no longer maintain 75 miles per hour. In fact, I can’t keep the speedometer needle pegged at 65. I have to downshift to 4th gear (the transmission has 5 speeds) just to be able to hold steady at 55. Now things are starting to feel tedious."


I thought it was a fair review of the motorcycle. Given that the top speed doesn't work for the author's geographical region (or his preference) doesn't mean that it won't work for others in the United States and he clearly states this at least a couple of times while diving into other aspects of the motorcycle that might make it appealing (price, style etc.) or not so appealing (quality reputation, power etc.) to the North American market. No big revelations here compared to other past reviewers but some pretty pictures and a neat trip to a rad mining spot. 
2007 500 Military 5spd


Merrill

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Reply #21 on: August 14, 2018, 11:51:12 pm
Voodoo,,  this artical is  indicative of what the Himalayan actually is and reflects well the bikes  prowess .   Thanks for posting the link.  I enjoyed reading it. .........
In Eastern Washington there is still lots of great areas to ride none of which require interstate miles to access.   Like the artical mentions ,  the bike is a good fit for our  region  .   


Richard230

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Reply #22 on: August 15, 2018, 08:13:14 am
I believe the specific article you're referring to is by Abhi Eswarappa of Bike-Urious. He has now released it on his website here: https://www.bike-urious.com/bike-review-2018-royal-enfield-himalayan/

"...Leaving Los Angeles with the goal of achieving solitude typically requires a few hours of droning on the highway, and this trip will be no different. Reward Mine is 225 miles away from my front door, and all but 8 of those miles will be on pavement, usually with a speed limit above 65. This is going to be the tedious part of the journey, but I have to suffer through it to get to the good stuff. At sea level on flat ground, the Himalayan is content to cruise at 75 miles per hour, and I don’t have anything to complain about.
...It may not be a huge difference, and it’s definitely not a RE-specific problem, but as I’m trying to ride uphill fighting a headwind at elevation, I can no longer maintain 75 miles per hour. In fact, I can’t keep the speedometer needle pegged at 65. I have to downshift to 4th gear (the transmission has 5 speeds) just to be able to hold steady at 55. Now things are starting to feel tedious."


I thought it was a fair review of the motorcycle. Given that the top speed doesn't work for the author's geographical region (or his preference) doesn't mean that it won't work for others in the United States and he clearly states this at least a couple of times while diving into other aspects of the motorcycle that might make it appealing (price, style etc.) or not so appealing (quality reputation, power etc.) to the North American market. No big revelations here compared to other past reviewers but some pretty pictures and a neat trip to a rad mining spot.

That is a much more informative and interesting article than the version printed in Motorcyclist.  The version published in the magazine had all negative comments about the Himalayan removed, along with any comparisons with similar Japanese motorcycles in it price range. However, they did use some of the photos in the story written by Abhi Eswarappa.  So there you go. Some creative editing and the hook is out for an RE ad or two.   ::)

I bet the previous version of Motorcyclist magazine that I have subscribing to since the Peterson Quarterly days in the early 1970's, would have published the entire article without neutering it.  >:(
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1