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Author Topic: First AVL ownership/build... tech questions...  (Read 3696 times)

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ringoism

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Reply #45 on: April 22, 2018, 10:34:01 am
....a recovering Himalaya Basher.

Recovering, not quite recovered, but on the road... to fuller improvements and inevitably, additional abuses. 

For your viewing pleasure, a few pics taken here locally today, attached down below:

Looks better, turns better, stops better, runs better, and is more comfy besides.  Still a raw, rude, crude old thing of course, but pretty tolerable. 

Got lightly rear-ended a few days back by a car... smashing the std. Bullet taillight (which I always loathed) and bending the heavy number plate - fortunately not the mudguard.  So put in a new aftermarket light that probably weighs a hundred grams vs. maybe a kilo for the original (every bit helps).

Caught up in other work so just riding it for now.  200km's done thus far.  Rings must be seating, because leakdown is minimal and getting the engine to where I need to for kicking is becoming tougher.  Looking for a couple of missing decompressor parts...

Otherwise hoping above all that the crank will hold up.  If all's well, I could probably be riding this for a long time. 

-Eric


tooseevee

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Reply #46 on: April 22, 2018, 03:36:55 pm
   Interesting. So your dip stick was completely smooth? Must be an Indian thing.
   My Electra X dip stick is flattened on one side with cross hatching. Still a bit hard to read with fresh oil, but workable.
   

            Rub some chalk into the cross-hatching. Instant readableness :) ;)
2008 AVL Classic.Extensive head work by Ace.Ace canister/TM32/Ace manifold.Small open bottle/hot tube removed.Pertronix Coil.Bobber seat.Fed mandates removed.Battery in right side case.Decomp&all doodads removed.'30s Lucas taillight/7" headlight.


DanB

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Reply #47 on: April 22, 2018, 07:13:32 pm
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For your viewing pleasure, a few pics taken here locally today, attached down below

Looks good to me!! Nice job and enjoy the ride.
Suppose I were an idiot, and suppose I were a member of Congress; but I repeat myself. ... Mark Twain
2006 AVL Electra


Adrian II

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Reply #48 on: April 23, 2018, 04:19:18 am
The decompressor on the AVL is a joke.

With a bit of work to the cylinder head you can fit the old-style decompressor off the iron barrel models. Works just fine.

https://forum.classicmotorworks.com/index.php/topic,25254.0.html

A.
Grumpy Brit still seeking 500 AVL Bullet perfection! Will let you know if I get anywhere near...


ringoism

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Reply #49 on: May 12, 2018, 02:09:05 pm
Re: the original AVL decompressor, I've actually seen a couple that work - at least they work as well as I'd need them to, just something to get me over the compression "hump" before kicking so it's rotated to where it needs to be...  That said I know the CI decomps work better and have seen one AVL here thus converted, but I just don't feel like cutting into my head or especially removing fins. 

Two questions:

1.  Was wondering what can be done about headlight aim on the original style (I guess 7") models without adjustments (I understood from another thread that the DOT mandated adjustability, forcing RE to switch to smaller reflector in the U.S. to allow space for the screws?).  Anyway, I'm continually blinding oncoming traffic on low-beam, and high beam does me no good, being pointed pretty much up in the trees (this is not related to my tyre-size change btw).  Seems a common issue here, but as a great many Indians don't mind blinding one another, and actually seeing where one is going is generally optional, not many complain and thus solutions are not exactly highly sought after / developed on this end. 

2.  Photos below show two different front shock types.  The second one is used on pretty much every Bullet model from long ago till the present.  The first is (curiously) utilized on the domestic-market "Desert Storm" (military-colored) 500CL (UCE) Classic, and so far as I can tell, on nothing else.  All the other 350/500CL models, as well Std. UCE Bullet, CI's, AVL, etc, etc, have the axle mounted forward for an inch or so of rake/offset.  Why the zero rake geometry was used on the D-S only is seriously mysterious, I don't remember the bike being marketed as having a revised suspension or unique intended use or anything.  Can anyone fill me in on what the export models are using, and what the observed / expected effects would be?  I'm assuming quicker turning (which I wouldn't mind actually)? 

thanks again in advance. 



Arizoni

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Reply #50 on: May 12, 2018, 04:58:06 pm
The "in line" style of front fork with the axle in line with the center of the tubes is not unusual here in the US. 

Several years ago, Royal Enfield addressed the handling problem we found with the C5 motorcycles by redesigning the front fork.  They also quit supplying the C5 with the smaller, 17 inch (I think) rear rim and changed it to a 19 inch size.

The older C5's handling problem was at high speeds above 60 mph the motorcycle became totally unstable, twitching and moving in unexpected directions.
Needless to say, that was dangerous.
The new "in line" front fork and rear wheel change (and possibly other frame changes that weren't noticeable.) seems to have fixed the problem.

This instability problem was never present on the Electra's which have a different frame than the C5 and the Desert Storm (which is mainly just a different paint job on a C5).
As I recall, the B5 also has a different frame and it never had a problem.

I guess the bottom line is the AVL's don't have a frame like the C5 (and Indian Bullet) so they don't have the instability problem.

By the way, that offset front axle design goes all the way back to 1946, when Royal Enfield first introduced its tubular front fork.
It is one of the characteristics of Royal Enfields that distinguishes them from the BSA, Triumph, and other British middle-weight motorcycles who used the "in line" designs.
Ah!  Traditions !!!
« Last Edit: May 12, 2018, 05:03:41 pm by Arizoni »
Jim
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mattsz

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Reply #51 on: May 12, 2018, 05:09:10 pm
The older C5's handling problem was at high speeds above 60 mph the motorcycle became totally unstable, twitching and moving in unexpected directions.
Needless to say, that was dangerous.
The new "in line" front fork and rear wheel change (and possibly other frame changes that weren't noticeable.) seems to have fixed the problem.

Interestingly: as I recall, not all of those early C5's demonstrated those stability issues... some never showed any signs of trouble.  Others were very problematic.  No surprise there, I guess...


ringoism

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Reply #52 on: May 13, 2018, 11:49:17 am
Photo caption: "Why I never have high speed stability issues"... or, "What roads were like when the Bullet was originally conceived / built"; or "My current daily commute"

Well, they're working on "double-laning" the highway that leads up here but still not many straight stretches where 60mph is safe.  Indian consensus is that Bullets are best in every way around 50mph so handling complaints of the nature described would be rare. 

Wider/lower 18" rear and lower-profile 19" front tyres began with the C5 (I guess CL "Classic" here) around 2011, and all domestic RE models (exc. CGT maybe) use them now, partly for looks and partly maybe because it lightens the front wheel a bit and gives a bit better braking traction out back. 

I'd have thought the zero-offset fork would actually lead to quicker response/turning/"twitchiness?" (which I'd prefer up here) rather than being a solution for higher-speed issues.  Because it'd create a shorter wheelbase and something akin to a lesser castor angle I suppose?  Anyone ridden the two types side-by-side who'd be able to comment? 

And what of that headlight???


Adrian II

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Reply #53 on: May 13, 2018, 11:57:30 am
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And what of that headlight???

For purely cosmetic/personal preference reasons I replaced the casquette headlamp on my old Electra-X with an alloy top yoke and 50's style headlamp brackets from Hitchcocks's here in the UK. This also allowed for full headlamp adjustment, as an added bonus.

I think the answer in your situation would be to use the front end parts off a 2004(?) 350 AVL Thunderbird with the separate headlamp, brackets and top yoke for the screw-in fork stanchions, not the later plain type, plus whatever instrument bracket takes your fancy, as you only have a speedometer and no rev-counter to worry about. The instrument bracket off the old Superstar Bullet would do it.

This is the Electra-XS, only seen in the UK, but with a Thunderbird type front end.



A.
Grumpy Brit still seeking 500 AVL Bullet perfection! Will let you know if I get anywhere near...


heloego

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Reply #54 on: May 14, 2018, 07:40:19 am
Buried somwhere in this forum is a post or 2 or 3 about headlights.IIRC the 7" lamp is available bias toward the left or right, depending on its intended country of destination. IOW which lane is correct for your country, so it aims a bit toward the side of the road, rather than the oncoming traffic.
Is it possible you have an incorrect lamp installed?
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Adrian II

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Reply #55 on: May 14, 2018, 09:05:02 am
If I remember correctly India drives on the left, the same as the UK. If it's a home market bike it should have the correct low or dipped beam which should deflect to the left, but if there's insufficient vertical adjustment to adjust the beam for height, i.e. lower it, it will STILL be a nuisance and possible danger to oncoming road users at night, whether or not it's the correct part.

A.

A.
Grumpy Brit still seeking 500 AVL Bullet perfection! Will let you know if I get anywhere near...