Author Topic: Mistake?  (Read 6793 times)

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suitcasejefferson

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on: March 28, 2018, 04:16:43 pm
I may be about to make an expensive mistake. I am seriously considering selling my new 2016 Honda Rebel and buying a Himalayan. And this is after having owned a 2013 B5 since new. I hear both good and bad things about the Himalayan. I have been a long distance rider all my life, racking up more than 800,000 miles. Due to medical issues and age, that has slowed down considerably. I have never had an adventure bike, and nothing out there pushes the right buttons for me, especially BMWs and KTMs. I love the old fashioned look of the Himalayan, and think it would look great with some panniers and a taller windshield. I probably would never leave the state with it, but it looks like a super fun bike, and it's definitely different from all those other "adventure" bikes out there.
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Reply #1 on: March 28, 2018, 05:19:10 pm
You've got my permission. ;)
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Kevin Mahoney

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Reply #2 on: March 28, 2018, 06:28:09 pm
I have ridden the Hymilayan 2.0 ( the version we will get that is the vastly improved model over the first ones introduced in India). As someone that has been with RE since before the turn of the century I was really surprised. It looked good, quality was excellent, you could ride on the freeway and it was great in the dirt. The track was really muddy and some of us put the bikes down without a lick of damage.

My advice is to buy one. It is really a homerun by RE
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Bilgemaster

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Reply #3 on: March 28, 2018, 06:51:29 pm
Rebel's a pretty good street bike, but if I were still out there in Arizona, New Mexico or West Texas, that new "sorted" Himalayan would be what I'd want too. Hell, they're such a bargain it might even be a wash for you financially speaking. Anyhow, why not give a holler to Double-D's Performance in Scottsdale, and see about a little test ride and take it from there?
« Last Edit: March 28, 2018, 07:32:12 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.


Morgan60

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Reply #4 on: March 29, 2018, 02:44:59 am
Mistake? No Mistake. I signed up for The Western States 1000 just for a shakedown cruise in June. No worries! I just got a email from a friend he to put a deposit on a Himalayan and he also is going to join me on the run.  What a site it’ll be with two RE Himalayas putting along with all the beg touring bikes. :-)
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tooseevee

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Reply #5 on: March 29, 2018, 07:02:32 am
    I like that damn Himalayan more and more the more I see and read about it. I think they somehow hit the nail on the head - wonder of wonders  :o :) :)

     It's got a hint of of Mad Max, dirt bike, scrambler, "Long Way Home", street fighter, urban assault vehicle, survival tool, fun runs to the hardware store. It pushes a lot of buttons.

     
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Kevin Mahoney

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Reply #6 on: March 29, 2018, 11:15:47 am
One ride on the Himalayan will convince you that it is a great bike and a "must have" motorcycle. I don't have a dog in this fight anymore and it is immaterial to me how sales go. Given that I stand by my assessment.
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voodoochild

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Reply #7 on: March 29, 2018, 12:46:30 pm
At the beginning of last year, I planned to test ride the KTM Duke390, the BMW 310GS, The Honda Rebel and the Himalayan. More than a year and test rides on the BMW 310R and the Himalayan BS4 (in India last month) later, I put my deposit down on the Himalayan last month.
Plus it will match the 2007 iron barrel Bullet in the garage so nicely!   8)
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ROVERMAN

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Reply #8 on: March 29, 2018, 04:27:02 pm
Sounds like the Himi is made for you SCJ, oh wait, it is fuel injected! ;D ;D ;D
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Reply #9 on: March 31, 2018, 06:10:34 am
Isn’t the Rebel? It would be here in the U.K. The elephant in the room isn’t how nice the Himalayan feels to ride, its how reliable it turns out to be. The pioneers haven’t returned yet....
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Rattlebattle

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Reply #10 on: April 06, 2018, 04:43:38 pm
Just read a road test of the Himalayan in Old Bike Mart, a monthly sold in the UK that covers old bikes, oddly enough. Seems pretty positive. One thing it did mention was the delay of a year in bringing it to the UK. Apparently there were 36 modifications made between the initial ones and the final Euro IV ones that reached here in January. Why anyone would buy a first edition of anything beats me. The C5 is now what it should have been in 2009, well nearly. At least RE seems to have speeded up the development process with the Himalayan, which is likely to be a really good bike if that’s what you want.
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Reply #11 on: April 12, 2018, 03:04:59 pm
Wasn't too sure where to post this so I think this one might help you SCJ.

today I was ambling around 60mph down the motorway (freeway) on my way to the airport. Before I know it, I get overtaken by a Himalayan and it wasn't struggling at all as I reckon it was doing 70-75 and seemed to hold it well. I sped up to 70 to try and follow it before it turned off but due to traffic etc I'd have to had put a good spurt on to catch it up. It might have been going quicker than that. 80 perhaps.

So who ever in the UK that was on the M40 this afternoon on a white one and turned off at Banbury, I did toot as I went by if you heard it :)
« Last Edit: April 12, 2018, 03:09:49 pm by Carlsberg Wordsworth »


gavinfdavies

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Reply #12 on: April 12, 2018, 05:55:30 pm
I'm friendly with an independent RE dealer in the UK. Unlike most, he isn't owned by the imported. I'll ask if he's had any issues with them. He was the first in the UK to get them, and keeps selling out. GV Bikes in Taunton.


no bs

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Reply #13 on: April 12, 2018, 07:54:48 pm
anyone know the tank range on these? i got a klr to ride while doing the top end the second time on the frankenbullet, and i can get damn near 275 miles on a tank when riding fire trails in northern kalifornia.
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ace.cafe

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Reply #14 on: April 13, 2018, 07:38:54 am
My feelings are that "adventure " bikes end up being road bikes for 99.999% of the time. If I  had some notions of an occasional off-road excursion,  I would get a used cheap enduro bike and trailer it to the trails, and have a real road bike for the road.

Just my opinion.


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Reply #15 on: April 13, 2018, 10:02:58 am
I for one, do plan on getting into the mountains and forest as much as I can this summer, as well as enjoying paved roads.

Being still fairly new with motorcycles, there are yet a few mysteries for me to resolve and one of those is if you really need a "dirt bike" at all. 

I lost track long ago of how many you tube videos I've watched depicting Royal Enfields, generally in India, and usually riding through the Himalayas.

I'm sure a good dirt bike would be easier, apparently due to better shocks and more ground clearance, but the Indian Bullets of all descriptions have been one of the predominant himalaya vehicles of choice for around 60 years now.

If I ever make it there, I plan on riding a C5 just like my own at home.  In the mean time I will continue my Himalaya training this summer in the Cascades, on my C5 and see how that works for me.

I got K-70's, a skid plate, and am presently building a small adventure rack for hauling my gear. On my last forest service road excursion, I noticed my natural pace was from 5 - 20 mph. That will be fine for me.

I've noticed recently while watching non-RE off-road adventure videos that most of the guys you see are moving pretty fast like it's a race through the forest. Sometimes you can see their speedometers surging frantically from 0 - 50 mph. This often seems to be the reason for their crashes as well...

So, I'm taking it slow, and intend to see how much exploring can be done with my humble little Bullet. Soon enough I should know.

I never was one to prefer "the easy way", or to do what everyone else is doing, at least not until I do things the hard way first.

If and when I do decide that I need an adventure bike it will be the Himalayan. But first things first, one step at a time.
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devon john

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Reply #16 on: April 15, 2018, 03:56:20 am
sat on a himalaya last week ,,, me being 6'4" found it much more suited to me than my bullet ,,,

i liked the bike  it was better than i thought it might be ,

i will be watching with interest   to see what problems and mods  will happen in the next couple of years

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Bilgemaster

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Reply #17 on: April 15, 2018, 02:31:55 pm
My feelings are that "adventure " bikes end up being road bikes for 99.999% of the time. If I had some notions of an occasional off-road excursion,  I would get a used cheap enduro bike and trailer it to the trails, and have a real road bike for the road.

Just my opinion.

I already mentioned them in another Himalayan thread, but for those who might actually plan on taking their Himalayans a little off the beaten, or at least paved path, they might do well to check out that line of Butler Motorcycle Maps.

I thought I'd try out their Mid-Atlantic Backcountry Discovery Route Map. At $15 it seemed a tad pricey just to sate my mild curiosity, but it is indeed well made, tough and waterproof, and looks like it offers all the makings for a fine adventurey vacation. It's also directly associated with the BDR (Backcountry Discovery Routes) organization, which is a non-profit. So I guess you're getting your money's worth and supporting a good cause while your at it.  For the youngsters, for whom printed maps generally seem as timely and useful as buggy whip oil, or even spoiled eldsters like me, whose main "discovery riding" nowadays often consists of discovering they now require their GPS to make it to the damned supermarket on the first try, the printed maps feature GPS waypoints tied in with BDR's online offerings and even films. In the case of my specific Mid-Atlantic map, these digital augments and other tie-ins are described here.

Since my fat ass is being hauled around by a humble old Bullet 500 "Iron Belly," I'm not likely to be soon taking on some of those more "challenging" optional mapped routes, where you're plodding along some muddy creek bed waving a machete or hoisting your ride from some scum pit with a block and tackle. That said, you might find me soon on some of those remote paved route options out there in Western Virginia or West Virginia.

As for "adventure bikes" mostly never seeing any more challenging rides than down to the corner shop for a pack of Marlboros, the weirdest place I ever saw for this sort of thing was Paris. Maybe it's different now, but I recall being struck by the fact that it seemed like every other two-wheeler that wasn't some Mobylette-style moped looked like it was ready to set off on the Paris-Dakar rally. I remember thinking, "What the hell?," 'cause there were just so many too-tall scramblers teetering about. But I guess it was just like Hummers in the CostCo parking lot. I'm pretty sure that housewife didn't just swing by and take up four parking spots to grab some supplies before the big assault on Kandahar.

Lastly, as an old Bullet owner too set in my ways to probably ever buy a new vehicle of any kind, Himalayan or otherwise, I feel obliged to point out that a well-found Bullet can get up to and through all sorts of adventuresome hijinx.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 03:38:29 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.


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Reply #18 on: April 15, 2018, 06:31:57 pm
True. Even the "Fat Little Pig" KLR-650 was really too heavy off road other than maybe a double track or very easy single track. It got to the point I was having a hard time handling it and then I got to the point I couldn't pick it up without help. My doctors have help me out a lot BUT no way I'd try a 1200GSA offroad. I'm hoping the Himalayan will be both light enough and have a low enough center of gravity to be usable on some of the easier trail to drag my sorry hide up to fly-fish. All I want is a humble little bike that can get the job done without having to pay big buck only to find I have a coffee shop ride.
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Fragman

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Reply #19 on: April 22, 2018, 11:45:11 pm
Me dealer mentioned to me yesterday, that some new Himalayans are on the way so I'll be a testing one out in the near future. The only real piss-off fer me is that the Himalayan is over 400cc, which puts it in the 400-750cc insurance bracket here in BC. I wish the Himalayan was 399cc to reduce the gouge forced on us by the insurance monopoly creeps.  >:(

I'd have to like the Himi a bunch to consider changing from me C5. ::)
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Z1300

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Reply #20 on: May 08, 2018, 03:30:55 am
We have had these in Australia for a while. I ride one regularly Buy one. Biasd RE Dealer 


Blairio

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Reply #21 on: May 08, 2018, 09:35:55 pm
sat on a himalaya last week ,,, me being 6'4" found it much more suited to me than my bullet ,,,

i liked the bike  it was better than i thought it might be ,

i will be watching with interest   to see what problems and mods  will happen in the next couple of years

john

I used to ride scramblers in my youth (Suzuki TS185 for instance), not because I did much off-roading, but because with my lanky legs I couldn't get comfy on available road bikes.  Fast forward 40 years and perhaps one reason for the growth in popularity in 'adventure' bikes is just this - they are a more comfy ride for taller folk (men & women).  Yes people will buy them for pose value, and a few will even ride them as they were intended (all terrain adventures), but I reckon some Himalyan sales will be down to inside leg measurement.


Morgan60

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Reply #22 on: May 09, 2018, 05:22:07 am
anyone know the tank range on these? i got a klr to ride while doing the top end the second time on the frankenbullet, and i can get damn near 275 miles on a tank when riding fire trails in northern kalifornia.

My very first tank of fuel I got 74.24 mpg. At a four gal tank that’s 296 miles. That’s brake in miles doing under 40 mph.
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Merrill

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Reply #23 on: May 10, 2018, 10:13:50 am
Morgan60,, do they recommend premium fuel,  or can a fellow get by with regular. ?  Great mileage by the way.  The more I hear about this bike the better I like it !


Morgan60

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Reply #24 on: May 15, 2018, 08:42:38 pm
I as a rule have always used premium and alcohol free when available in all my bikes.
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suitcasejefferson

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Reply #25 on: July 12, 2018, 09:21:56 am
They STILL don't have one at my local dealer,  Double-D's Performance. They do have a beautiful red C-GT for $5K. I sure wish I could handle that riding position.

I put premium fuel in both the RE and my Sportster 1200, but there is no such thing as ethanol free in AZ. I have 4 bikes stored in my living room, I removed the tanks, poured out all the gas, made real sure they were empty, then got some ethanol free small engine fuel at Walmart. It's called SEF, and it costs $20 a gallon. I put a gallon in each bike. It is supposed to last 2 years. Now I can start the bikes up once in a while so they don't deteriorate. $20 a gallon is peanuts compared to what ethanol gas can do to your bike, but way to expensive to use for riding.

Of the 2 bikes I have regular ethanol gas in, if I haven't used it up in 6 weeks, I drain it out and pour it into a car, and refill with fresh gas. I won't leave ethanol in a bike for more than 6 weeks.
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khoihoangminh92

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Reply #26 on: September 04, 2018, 02:10:57 am
For me personally, I do love the Himalayan riding style and the possibilities when it come to the dirt track. Really fun to ride, you should buy one :)


Norm

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Reply #27 on: September 20, 2018, 01:46:41 pm
Having been thoroughly burned on the new 2010 RE C5, and more than happy to have anyone buy it, I'd say wait and learn more about how the company is addressing QC issues on the Himi. 


A 2016 Rebel is bullet-proof, so to speak, and is likely more potent than the new RE. 


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suitcasejefferson

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Reply #28 on: October 03, 2018, 02:32:06 pm
I finally got to sit on the new Himalayan, and was seriously disappointed. Not with the bike. It actually looks good, better than in pictures, and I would be willing to take a chance considering the price. But sadly, I was barely able to get on and off it. Once on it, the seat felt fine, and I could easily flat foot it. But I have severe arthritis, bad hip joints and bad knee joints. I don't think it will be long until I would not be able to get on and off it at all. The same thing may eventually be true of my 2013 Bullet. At least I can still ride my Rebel and my Sportster 1200 LOW, as in low seat height. Eventually I will be stuck with scooters, like my 2006 Vespa GT200.
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Bilgemaster

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Reply #29 on: October 03, 2018, 10:00:38 pm
[...snip!]
I put premium fuel in both the RE and my Sportster 1200, but there is no such thing as ethanol free in AZ.
[snip!...]

Actually, unlike your neighboring state of California, where untainted ethanol-free fuel is REAL hard to come by, and the available state-mandated spew is its own specially-blended ultra-oxygenated brew that'll cause your whole fuel system to reenact that scene from Raiders of the Lost Ark  where they open the thing, according to the Pure-gas.org state-by-state directory of Ethanol-free gas sources, there seem to plenty of places to get the good stuff in The Grand Canyon State.

Like the other engines I most care about, my old "iron belly" Bullet is generally on a steady diet of ethanol-free 89 octane available about 20 miles from home, with a dash of Marvel Mystery Oil. In colder months, when I ride less, I'll also use some StaBil 360 Marine. Pretty much the only time I'll use whatever local ethanol spew's on tap is when I'm touring far from home and have no choice. Ethanol is Evil. Write your Congressman and tell them so.


« Last Edit: October 03, 2018, 10:33:05 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.


suitcasejefferson

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Reply #30 on: October 04, 2018, 06:39:28 am
I can't find any place in AZ that sells ethanol free gas. I have 4 bikes stored in what used to be my living room, and I put a gallon of SEF in each one. I got it at Walmart. It is $20 a gallon and claims to have a 2 year life. That way I can start and warm up the engines once in a while to prevent deterioration. And not have to worry about messing up the carburetors.
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Richard230

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Reply #31 on: October 04, 2018, 08:00:23 am
You can write your Congressperson all you want complaining about your fuel containing mashed corn drippings, but unless you send along a few million dollars in your letter, all you will be receiving in more corn squeezings. (Now the big dash is to increase the percentage of included ethanol in your fuel to 15%, that no motorcycles or off-road vehicles can stomach.) Meanwhile, the price of corn and corn tortillas goes up in Mexico.  >:(
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Reply #32 on: October 04, 2018, 06:14:19 pm
The times I checked out the stations listed on some of the web sites that show filling stations that sell alcohol free gasoline in Arizona I found that they didn't have any.

I have found several places that do sell alcohol free gasoline but they all are in the business of selling racing fuel and they want an arm, a leg and part of your rectum as payment for it.
They also want you to sign a form that swears you will only use the fuel off road in a racing environment and lying about it is punishable by the law.
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Richard230

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Reply #33 on: October 04, 2018, 07:15:31 pm
The times I checked out the stations listed on some of the web sites that show filling stations that sell alcohol free gasoline in Arizona I found that they didn't have any.

I have found several places that do sell alcohol free gasoline but they all are in the business of selling racing fuel and they want an arm, a leg and part of your rectum as payment for it.
They also want you to sign a form that swears you will only use the fuel off road in a racing environment and lying about it is punishable by the law.

Sounds like California is moving east.  ::)
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suitcasejefferson

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Reply #34 on: October 29, 2018, 11:25:27 pm
I am taking a trip up to Portland OR next week to visit relatives (in a car) I found a dealer called Triumph of Seattle that sells RE. They have Himalayans in stock, and allow test rides. I'm going to take a run up there and check one out again. My only issue has been getting on it. The riders seat is fine, but I found it difficult to swing my leg over the passenger seat getting on. But I really like this bike, and have a couple of other bikes I don't really want anymore that I can sell to pay for most of it, and make room for it.
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Bilgemaster

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Reply #35 on: December 02, 2018, 04:37:31 pm
Sounds like a plan. I hear and see only good things about the Himis. Affordable off-road competence. As for me,  I spent the afternoon looking over a forlorn '95 1200 Sportster in blue. Pictures and commentary to follow as a separate topic soon if I wind up adopting this rescue scoot...
« Last Edit: December 03, 2018, 05:35:19 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.


9fingers

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Reply #36 on: December 03, 2018, 06:08:22 am
Suitcasejefferson, I am a little late to this thread but wanted to comment. I went to the NYC bike show Saturday to check out the new 650s and  I have to say, while I was there, I checked out the Himalayan and was very impressed. It looks and feels right and was just super comfortable. I watched all the YouTube videos I could find and this thing is pretty cool! I could see myself getting one. After riding bikes between 154lbs and 204lbs most of my life....see list below......I can't quite get my head around riding a 400lb bike off road, but I watched people do it successfully on the videos and it was clear the bike was pretty good even if some of the riders were not that good. As for getting a leg up over the back? Yes, it is a bit of a stretch. Maybe try the method used by hotshot cowboys in the old westerns and jump off something high and land in the saddle..........then again, maybe not. Please let us know after your test ride.
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Beardo

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Reply #37 on: February 07, 2019, 07:00:37 pm
I'm 5'9. Short of leg and too many injuries.

How I get on the Himalayan?

Bike on side stand. Left boot on the peg. Lift myself up. And over goes my right leg, with much less lifting height involved.

As for this 421 pound dual sport motorcycle offroad?

Way better than it ever has a right to be, according to paper specs. The center of gravity, and suspension that is over achieving, it is one set of narley 10/90 tires to allow it to climb the side of a mountain.

You won't be going fast. You'll just be going...

2000 Bullet 500


9fingers

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Reply #38 on: February 09, 2019, 10:50:39 am
And supposedly adding an EJK or maybe a Powertronic, does wonders for the power and responsiveness.
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Beardo

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Reply #39 on: February 11, 2019, 06:36:32 am
Of those two systems, from what information there is by actual users of the products, seems the PowerTronic is heads and shoulders above the EJK. And for good reason, it covers tha gamut, whereas the EJK, is simply as the name implies, Electronic Jet Kit.

Nothing 'wrong' with the EJK, mind you. I've used them on other motorcycles. I had never heard of PowerTronic until I got the 2013 Bullet, a month ago.
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suitcasejefferson

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Reply #40 on: February 12, 2019, 01:19:01 pm
Well, I have sold two of my 6 bikes, the 2016 Rebel, and my 2001 Yamaha XT225 (which is harder to get on and off of than the Himalayan) I have been to the local dealer and sat on the Himalayan 3 times. I have watched a lot of YouTube videos about it. I was able to get on the seat ok with nothing on the rear portion. However, I would likely have an issue getting on it with something strapped to the rear part of the seat. I am waiting on my tax refund. Right now I'm planning to spend it on a new Himalayan.

Despite the fact that I love the looks of the Interceptor twin, I'll pass on that. From all the videos I've seen on it it just seems too smooth and quiet. I love the sound and feel of my 2013 Bullet, but not the reliability. I've had to have it hauled home 3 times since buying it new. But I have a 2006 H-D Sportster 1200 which satisfies my desire for a bike with character. And it has yet to break down. I will still keep the Bullet and ride it once in a while. It is not worth trying to sell. A 6 year old RE converted to an Amal carb has almost no resale value.
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9fingers

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Reply #41 on: March 05, 2019, 07:38:41 am
SuitcaseJefferson, what were the issues that led to your breakdowns on the C5? I am guessing at least one of them was the small negative lead at the battery? Mine broke at around 1,000 miles, if I recall correctly. But no issues in the next 1200 miles.......well the sidestand did cut out once on me, but I figured that out quickly. I am riding the full length of the Blue Ridge Parkway, both directions thru Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, in August, and I will have my fingers crossed......all 9 of them.
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suitcasejefferson

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Reply #42 on: May 25, 2019, 01:45:43 pm
https://phoenix.craigslist.org/nph/mcd/d/peoria-2018-royal-enfield-himalayan/6886414333.html

This bike is sitting at my local dealer only a few miles away. I have looked at it and sat on it twice. I am literally bouncing off the walls trying to decide whether to buy it or not.
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suitcasejefferson

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Reply #43 on: May 25, 2019, 02:23:44 pm
SuitcaseJefferson, what were the issues that led to your breakdowns on the C5? I am guessing at least one of them was the small negative lead at the battery? Mine broke at around 1,000 miles, if I recall correctly. But no issues in the next 1200 miles.......well the sidestand did cut out once on me, but I figured that out quickly. I am riding the full length of the Blue Ridge Parkway, both directions thru Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, in August, and I will have my fingers crossed......all 9 of them.
9fingers

Actually it is a B5. Only one problem was serious, the rest were just aggravating. It started with less than 10 miles on the bike. I noticed the turn signals were not working. I also discovered the tail light. license plate light, and brake light were not working either. The rear tire had cut through the harness to the rear lights. I repaired the harness and rerouted it above the fender under the seat. Then the exhaust header studs and nuts kept coming loose. I started carrying extra studs and nuts with me. I finally replaced the studs and nuts with bolts, had the heads drilled, and safety wire them. Been good since. Then the battery failed, and while installing a new one, the battery cable broke. I fabricated some better cables and made them long enough that the battery could be turned around with the terminals facing outward. 5 years later that battery is still working, and the cables are still holding up fine. Then the fuel gauge quit working. I found the same thing many others have found. The float melted. The head stay broke. I fabricated a new one that should be about 10 times stronger. Then I decided to replace the EFI with a carb. I got a kit from Hitchcock's and installed an Amal carb. I also installed the premium EFI exhaust from CMW, with the baffle removed. Now it ran MUCH better, and sounded the way a RE should. My guess is that while I did not rejet the carb, it is a lot richer overall than it was with the EFI. It sounded very 'wheezy" with the EFI, now it has excellent throttle response and doesn't hesitate on full throttle like it did. While working on it, I had the tank off, and discovered the rear mounting was not designed right, or something was missing. The mounting tab that the rear mounting bolt goes through were bent inward, and still not touching the frame tube that the bolt goes through. I gently bent the mounting tabs out straight, got a longer bolt, and used washers as spacers between the frame tube and mounting tabs. I also put washers on the outside of the tabs. The holes in the tab are much larger than they needed to be for the bolt, and the bolt head almost pulled right through them. I'm assuming that since pretty much nothing lines up properly on the Bullet, they used oversized holes so the parts could be moved around a bit to make them fit.

The last failure was more serious. The rear wheel locked up just as I was pulling into a parking lot. Fortunately I didn't crash. I loosened the adjustment up all the way, and the wheel would turn again. When I took it apart, I found that the radius of the brake shoes was not the same as the drum by quite a bit. The shoes had a much larger radius, and only the ends of the shoes were touching the drum, and eventually the lining material broke off, and allowed metal to metal contact between the shoes and drum. I rode it for some time with no rear brake (the rear brake never did work right anyway) and finally got some new shoes from Hitchcock's that fit much better. When the wheel locked up, it also stretched the chain, which was already worn, so I also had to replace that. Shipping from the UK to the U.S. is crazy expensive. I have made 3 orders from the UK. Anyway, the bike is running ok now, and has just over 11,000 miles on it. Riding season is about over in the Phoenix, AZ area due to extreme heat. This summer I will put new tires on it and do all the recommended maintenance.

I am hoping the Himalayan is built better than the 2013 Bullet. I plan to buy one. I have been to the dealer twice to look at them. I'm the impulsive type. I'm likely to wake up some morning, and decide to just go get it.
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mattsz

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Reply #44 on: May 25, 2019, 05:05:01 pm
I am hoping the Himalayan is built better than the 2013 Bullet. I plan to buy one. I have been to the dealer twice to look at them. I'm the impulsive type. I'm likely to wake up some morning, and decide to just go get it.

That Himalayan is fair game, so don't wait too long...  ;)


Richard230

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Reply #45 on: May 26, 2019, 04:02:58 pm
I don't understand why Bullet and Classic owners are still having problems with the design and assembly of their bikes.  ??? After all, RE has been making these things forever and you would think that by now they would have them completely sorted so that they are very reliable right out of the box.  RE somehow managed to fix just about everything on the Himalayan after that first disastrous model year and now they seem to be quite reliable, as Itchy Boots has proved.  So what is it about the 500s?  Do they believe that their customers will just not be happy if they don't have to fix lots of stuff on the bikes so that they can get to know them better?   ::)
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


ace.cafe

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Reply #46 on: May 27, 2019, 07:02:54 am
I don't understand why Bullet and Classic owners are still having problems with the design and assembly of their bikes.  ??? After all, RE has been making these things forever and you would think that by now they would have them completely sorted so that they are very reliable right out of the box.  RE somehow managed to fix just about everything on the Himalayan after that first disastrous model year and now they seem to be quite reliable, as Itchy Boots has proved.  So what is it about the 500s?  Do they believe that their customers will just not be happy if they don't have to fix lots of stuff on the bikes so that they can get to know them better?   ::)
Well, it's a few things...

First, the 500s have been around as a displacement model for a long time, but the current models are pretty much completely different than previous Bullets. So, while it may seem like they have been around forever, it has only been 10 years.

Second, some 500 Bullet owners also get reliable bikes with decent longevity, while others do not. I cannot consider a single production example as characteristic of an entire production run of a  model, such as the Itchyboots bike representing all Himalayans.

The factory has basic typical production concepts/strategies which reflect the management's abilities. It is entirely possible/likely that Himalayan and 650 models will soon have equal production shortcomings as the other models produced by RE.

RE has always had cheap price with high profit as their top goals. I have never seen a quote from Sid Lal that he ever wanted to make the best motorcycle, but plenty of quotes about how RE made the most profit of any motorcycle company. Think about that for a minute, and you should have your answer.


Richard230

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Reply #47 on: May 27, 2019, 07:58:59 am
Well, it's a few things...

First, the 500s have been around as a displacement model for a long time, but the current models are pretty much completely different than previous Bullets. So, while it may seem like they have been around forever, it has only been 10 years.

Second, some 500 Bullet owners also get reliable bikes with decent longevity, while others do not. I cannot consider a single production example as characteristic of an entire production run of a  model, such as the Itchyboots bike representing all Himalayans.

The factory has basic typical production concepts/strategies which reflect the management's abilities. It is entirely possible/likely that Himalayan and 650 models will soon have equal production shortcomings as the other models produced by RE.

RE has always had cheap price with high profit as their top goals. I have never seen a quote from Sid Lal that he ever wanted to make the best motorcycle, but plenty of quotes about how RE made the most profit of any motorcycle company. Think about that for a minute, and you should have your answer.

That makes sense, but still, fixing simple chassis things like battery cables, metal head stays, improving the side stand safety switch, installing better batteries and other minor, but irritating, things like that would cost very little yet go along way toward causing less grief for the owner and RE's franchised dealers.  True, it might cut the profit margin of each bike by $10 or so, but it might be worth it to improve the new owner experience and RE's reputation.  ???
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


ace.cafe

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Reply #48 on: May 27, 2019, 12:30:52 pm
That makes sense, but still, fixing simple chassis things like battery cables, metal head stays, improving the side stand safety switch, installing better batteries and other minor, but irritating, things like that would cost very little yet go along way toward causing less grief for the owner and RE's franchised dealers.  True, it might cut the profit margin of each bike by $10 or so, but it might be worth it to improve the new owner experience and RE's reputation.  ???

I agree completely.
 But have they ever done it? No.

If you had ever seen the innards of as many RE engines as I have, you would be appalled at what kind of junk they try to get away with. The inside of the Iron Barrel 500 engines would make you gasp with horror, and for just a few dollars more they could have solved it all and had good bikes on the showroom floor.

I will say that they are trying to make a better effort as time goes by, but it is the mind set of manufacturing management to use the cheapest junk possible, especially inside the engines where the buyer won't see it until after warranty.

I suppose that I shouldn't complain because I made some money fixing their flaws.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 12:33:32 pm by ace.cafe »


suitcasejefferson

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Reply #49 on: May 31, 2019, 02:42:04 am
The 500s are very poorly made and very poorly designed. Fit and finish is terrible. When you have to make all the bolt holes oversized just so things will fit together that is not a good sign. The frame on the Bullet is a joke. The original Continental GT has a good frame, and it looks like the new twins and the Himalayan does as well. That long stroke single makes a lot of vibration (which is good for me, I love low frequency vibration) but the frame is not designed to handle it. A number of Bullet owners have had their frames break. I have never heard of the frame breaking on a Japanese bike, unless it was crashed hard. I have destroyed just about every part on Japanese dirt bikes, I have turned wheels into pretzels. But I have never broke a frame. I have been watching a lot of long distance rides on the Himalayan on YouTube, and it seems to be holding up very well. I want one. But I'm also 60 years old, and as you get older you start to think more rationally. I couldn't get on and off the XT anymore, and it was ridiculously uncomfortable and would not hold highway speeds. The Rebel was an impulse buy, I bought it fairly cheap because the dealer was trying to clear them out to make room for the 2017 models, which to me are about the most disgusting bikes I've ever seen. So, having had 3 other Rebels, first one bought new back in 1985, I've had a thing for them ever since. They are too small for me, and get uncomfortable real quick. They also have tube type tires and no centerstand. But now I am faced with the rational decision to put the money in the bank, or buy another motorcycle with it. When I was young, I would have been willing (and did several times) to take out a high interest loan to buy one.

Right now I have to take a car trip up to Portland OR to spend a couple of weeks with my sister and brother in law. My sister has been in a wheelchair for a couple of years, due to cancer of the spine. When I get back I will go to the dealer and talk numbers. My 2013 B5 cost me about $1000 over MSRP OTD. But half that was our 10% sales tax. With title and registration, I think I got a pretty good deal. If I can get the Himalayan for a deal like that I will almost certainly buy it. I go to bed at night thinking about it. That must mean I want it really bad. But I have been scammed by so many dealers, both car and motorcycle, that I'm going to be careful. They have a tendency to say "we can only guarantee you this deal if you buy today" I usually walk out when I hear that. I don't like high pressure sales tactics. It's also the beginning of summer right now, riding season won't be back for several months. All that time I'd just have to sit there and look at it.
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suitcasejefferson

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Reply #50 on: June 15, 2019, 08:26:26 pm
Numbers didn't even come close. GOAZ motorcycles has a $390 doc fee. When I bought my 2013 B5, MSRP was $4999, and I got it OTD for $6000, including nearly $500 in sales tax, title and registration, and delivery to my house 100 miles from the dealer. Looks like RE has joined the Japanese brand dealers with their ridiculously high bogus fees.
"I am a motorcyclist, NOT a biker"
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wildbill

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Reply #51 on: June 26, 2019, 11:05:26 pm
even I have done a complete turnaround and decided NOT to buy a new interceptor. just purchased and actual paid for a brand new triumph street scrambler which I think will be a far better bike in all areas. saying that though its a huge jump in price above an interceptor. if judging by my older 013 scrambler 865 model is anything to go on.
I think the c5 have improved over the past years but could be a lot better just the same. its not as if they give them away. that is price wise.
the Himalayan still has me interested in the idea of buying a unit to try it out. I think that idea will happen pretty soon.
2011 C5 black/chrome
2012 C5 maroon/chrome 
2013 B5 black
2014  gt
2014 C5 tan
2015 black/chrome
2015 dispatch
2016 lagoon blue 500
2016  ash white 350
2017 graphite/chrome 500
2018 gun metal grey 500
2018 C5 Pegasus 500
2017 C5 Redditch 50
2018 C5 gun metal grey
2019 650 interceptor


GlennF

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Reply #52 on: June 27, 2019, 12:00:40 am
even I have done a complete turnaround and decided NOT to buy a new interceptor. just purchased and actual paid for a brand new triumph street scrambler which I think will be a far better bike in all areas. saying that though its a huge jump in price above an interceptor. if judging by my older 013 scrambler 865 model is anything to go on.
I think the c5 have improved over the past years but could be a lot better just the same. its not as if they give them away. that is price wise.
the Himalayan still has me interested in the idea of buying a unit to try it out. I think that idea will happen pretty soon.

When I bought my 2011 Bullet, the three finalists for a new bike at the time were the Triumph Scrambler, the Guzzi V7 and the Bullet. I was originally tempted to buy the Guzzi as my previous two bikes, an 80's GT550 and an XJ900 had both been shaft drive and I like the convenience of the shafts, especially if you ride on dirt and through flooded creeks a lot.

However given that I now live in town and actually use the Bullet to potter about and ride to work if the weather is nice, I do not regret my choice.


wildbill

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Reply #53 on: June 27, 2019, 06:34:33 am
yeah ive watched dozens of videos and the old version scrambler i bought the 013 model is a far cry from the new version i bought which arrives next week. i was suppose to collect it in Sydney today but decided they could deliver it for roughly $500-drop off the new and take mine away.
to keep on track i might order the Himalayan in sleet next week and see how long that takes to get. don't want white or black!i think the sleet is an interesting colour. this purchase is a bit of a gamble as both times ive look at a Himalayan in the showrooms ive thought-heap of crap and never sat on them. but it may look better in the sleet so i will get one try it out and if no good some-one will buy one cheap...lol
now if your into 2 strokes ive just lined up and purchased a Yamaha DT175 in mint condition. ready to go out and purchase it tomorrow so that should be interesting. have not had a 2 stoker since i bought a Suzuki 750gt new back in '73
so there are deals flying in the land of oz in all directions
2011 C5 black/chrome
2012 C5 maroon/chrome 
2013 B5 black
2014  gt
2014 C5 tan
2015 black/chrome
2015 dispatch
2016 lagoon blue 500
2016  ash white 350
2017 graphite/chrome 500
2018 gun metal grey 500
2018 C5 Pegasus 500
2017 C5 Redditch 50
2018 C5 gun metal grey
2019 650 interceptor