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Author Topic: Tires' Mileage + Age + Style x Habits =  (Read 1413 times)

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Jellyroll

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on: March 14, 2018, 05:14:00 pm
Howdy fellas, y'know lately I've been pondering the GTs' tire situation. I want something different. We'll use my tires(stock Pirellis) and their age plus my riding style/habits, and if you would cite your own concerns considering your own tires, style and general environment and conditions.
The scooter is a'14, first model with all the problems, etc. I have about 4600 miles on the clock. It was my weekend funbike/hit the backroads if I have a couple hours kind of bike, shift points at about 4 grand... So far it has seen three Texas summers with no problems tire-wise; no dry rot, cracking, graining. I keep a bleary eye on the air pressures at 32psi generally. However, the rear tire seems greasy if underinflated by even a couple pounds, or until hot, and I cannot tell when I'm actually locking up until I feel it wash out and reduce braking pressure. The tire gives no warnings,makes NO noise at all.
Some fellas say they only got three grand out of the back, some say five. Although I usually ride a smidge on the 'spirited' side in the countryside while in town I stay as friendly as possible. And I still have a huge amount of meat, especially noticeable in the back. The front tends to dive too much, forcing the tire to tuck when cold, usually during quick maneuvering at low speed. However, both operate nicely when hot and anywhere above 25mph.
Eventually these skins are going to crap out, and when they do I don't want another set; I guess they're just too sporty for my style of riding. I want sticky from the first revolution. I've had Michelin dual compound tires, Carlisle tires, Continentals, Goodyears, old school crappy Bridgestones, great Bridgestones. But never Dunlops. When young they were way out of my pay grade. Or unavailable in 'that' size. Now with the GT I want Dunlops, K70/81s. They have it all and at a decent pricing.
Coker has some nice Firestones, but the tread pattern doesn't look as aggressive or efficient at sipe-ing away water.
For those who have done a tire swap, I'd love to hear your personal opinions on the tires you chose for your GT from new rubber til now.
BTW our local airshow website is up and updated as new acts are added through the end of April.  www.centraltexasairshow.com
Cheerio!
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Bilgemaster

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Reply #1 on: March 14, 2018, 06:24:42 pm
Sounds like you've already had more experience with real riding on a wider variety of rubber than at least 3½ of me.  Whatever the bike, I have always tended towards that sedate sort of mostly vertical just-plodding-along riding style, often with way too much luggage, characterized by pronounced "chicken stripes" in my rear rubber that made them look almost like squared-off sidecar tires by the time I'd swap them. You know: worn to the cords in the middle, plenty of tread left at the edges.

With that said, I am a bit surprised you haven't mentioned Avons. Avon Speedmaster Mark IIs are what came on my still fairly new-to-me 2005 Bullet 500ES Military.  I recently revived/bookmarked an old tire thread in these forums found here just for later ready reference for when it comes time to get new rubber on mine. Several others there recommended  Avon AM26 Roadriders. My only issue with my own Avons so far has been that they get very poor traction that last hundred feet or so of each trip--across my wet lawn and through the back yard. When the time comes, I expect I'll be getting some familiar Dunlop K70s just for mixed surfaces traction's sake. Still, those Avon AM26 might be just what you need for that peg-scraping Conti of yours on Texas blacktop.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2018, 06:28:50 pm by Bilgemaster »
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gizzo

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Reply #2 on: March 15, 2018, 02:36:21 am
Jellyroll, my tyres seem to last about 8000-9000km (5500 miles). The front is about ready to change at the same time as the rear. That's unusual for me, most bikes I get 2 fronts to a rear. Never mind. I've used the stock Pirelli Sport Demons, Dunlop Arrowmax front and rear and now have a Bridgestone Battlaxe BT45 rear, Sport Demon front. I tried the Dunlops for something different and bought the BT45 because there was no Pirelli in stock.
The Dunlops are a good all rounder and stick well enough mostly. I did have a few slides on them though. I thought they might last a bit longer than the Pirellis but not so. I wouldn't buy them again if I had other options. The BT45 I haven't ridden on much yet so can't really comment.
Next tyre swap I'll plan ahead and make sure a pair of Sport Demons are available and I think I'll stick with them. My riding is a mix of commuting, hills scratching, touring at sensible speeds and the odd track day. The rear tyre develops a flat spot around the centre but the fronts usually have tread on the middle when the edges are gone.
I can't see retro tyres suiting my riding style and I'm more than happy with the Sport Demons.
If Michelin made their Pilot Road 4 or 5 in our size, I'd be on them like stink on shit.
I'm getting a set of Dunlop Alpha 14's for my motard. The Dunlop Sportmax is really disappointing on that bike. They slide too easily.

You might like to look at the Metzeler Lasertec. They're available in the sizes for a CGT. They have an old school (ish) tread pattern that's a mile deep and the price is right. I'm using them on my classic Ducati. They seem to work fine for the 6/10ths riding that bike is used for. I'll probably never take it to the track but for road riding the Lasertecs work fine.

I saw Bilgemaster mentioned Cheng Shin: Years ago when I was a bit skint I put a set of Cheng Slime Barracudas on the old Duc. They were bloody brilliant. But not fashionable and can't find them for sale anymore.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2018, 03:43:08 am by gizzo »
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
TRX850
DRZ400SM


Richard230

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Reply #3 on: March 15, 2018, 08:21:14 am
My 2014 Zero came with IRC Road Winners (Road Whiners).  They last a long time, are expensive for what you get and were really slippery on damp roads.  So I don't recommend those tires.  I replaced them with Michelin Street Radial tires, which seem OK and come at a reasonable price.  I think my favorite bias-ply tire is the Metzeler Me33 (now Lasertecs) on the front and whatever it is that they are now selling for the rear. The BT45 works well, but is a little pricey for an older-designed tire and they tend to wear out faster than some other brands.
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


KD5ITM

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Reply #4 on: March 17, 2018, 04:51:33 pm
I'm pretty much like you jelly roll, my bikes got just to take over 6,500 miles. 2014 GT. Shift around 4000. My bike does see the freeway at around 60 miles plus or-, but not for prolonged stents. I used to work 4 hours on a Sunday morning each week so I would use my GT when the weather was good. 25 mile ride on the highway one way. Again speeds around 60. Mostly it's my go to the coffee shop or kill a couple of hours or hit the back roads once I get away from the freeways. My tires look fine. Still have the factory check marks with a grease pen. No weather checks. Tread hasn't hit the wear marks yet. Always run about 32 psi in both tires. Have to air it up about once every two weeks orrell drop 2 to 3 lb. Roads around Houston and the suburbs to the north or mostly concrete. The back roads are usually pretty decent asphalt. I would like a more classy looking Tire when it's time to change but I asked this question about a year-and-a-half ago and everybody told me keep the tires that came on it, don't put clown shoes on it. I would kind of like a classier alternative without losing much of the performance.
2014 Continental GT - red
1979 Hurst/Olds W-30 - whit and gold
1964 Volvo PV544 - desert sand
1961 Willys Jeep Utility Wagon - saturn yellow
2014 Trek Madone 5.9
2013 Specialized Carve Pro


Bilgemaster

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Reply #5 on: March 17, 2018, 06:09:58 pm
Your bike. Your choice. If it makes you happy, go for the damned clown tires!



You can teach the hottie the right direction to sit on the bike all in good time...
« Last Edit: March 17, 2018, 06:17:28 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.


gizzo

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Reply #6 on: March 18, 2018, 04:17:35 am
True that.  And if you're just gently popping around,  the classic  treads and clown shoes will work fine. 
simon from south Australia
Continental GT
Pantah
Monster
DR250
TRX850
DRZ400SM


Jellyroll

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Reply #7 on: March 18, 2018, 03:43:06 pm
oh good one ;D...nice rack for them tires... :o KD, sounds like we could ride the hills n curves and stay in the mirrors; surprised at the Pirellis' keeping up on the major concrete H has.                                                                                  I have the Michelin ME 55 Metronic on the rear of my Virago(restoration/upgrade project) and it is freakin' wonderful. Dual compounds are the way to go imho, for the V twin. Outstanding long range performance and "over your head but here anyway" cornering. A very confidence-inspiring tire for extended runs over endless roads.
But, for the GT I spend more time on errands that will fit into my ALICE. My peg scraping is done on the one road around here you can call 'entertaining' and I know it very well(outcornered a Hayabusa last Saturday, chicken strip is now at the second row of mold nipples from the shoulder). Mostly for real riding enjoyment I cruise at 55-65 with absolutely no miles on the Interstate.
Bilgemaster, the Avons are a nogo for that very reason. Grass. Leaves. Branches. Crap blown out of pickup trucks. Diapers tossed out of car windows. Add the word Wet. But also really good dry weather tires as well. Here in Tejas shitty weather just appears out of thin air, and (damn you Murphy) usually when you're on the road.
I still have time on these skins, but hey Xmas is only who cares days away....Cheerio, Yall! 8)
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KD5ITM

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Reply #8 on: June 10, 2018, 11:46:27 am
Jellyroll... yeah, I'm not an aggressive writer nor do I ride in the rain. The Pirelli tires seem to do just perfect for my style of riding. I hit the freeway normally for no more than 10 to 15 miles around 62 to 65 miles an hour. Once in a very great while I'll hit the interstate for 30 or 40 miles again, keeping it under 65 miles an hour. But even on the back roads out in the countryside north of Houston, I'm not aggressive through the curves. I'd love to put a set of modern retro-looking tires on the bike but everybody seems to have an issue with the amount of grip. I'm sure for my non aggressive writing style the grip wouldn't be much of an issue but I would hate to find out the hard way. Right now, I've got just a tick over 7,300 miles and still some tread left on my stock 2014 Pirelli tires. Not down-to-the-wire marks just yet. I started a couple months ago running the front and rear tire around 26 PSI. The rear tire develops a flat spot around the center of the tire which is to be expected. I weigh 155, not a heavy Rider by any means but still, when you're not carving up the curves, you will get that bit of a flat spot in the tire. When I get ready to change these tires, the Pirelli sport demon will be at the top of my list but I wouldn't mind entertaining a couple other different style of tires as long as the price is right and they seem to have pretty decent reviews on the grip and wear.
2014 Continental GT - red
1979 Hurst/Olds W-30 - whit and gold
1964 Volvo PV544 - desert sand
1961 Willys Jeep Utility Wagon - saturn yellow
2014 Trek Madone 5.9
2013 Specialized Carve Pro


Aus.GT

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Reply #9 on: June 10, 2018, 02:50:26 pm
I use and Like Continental Tyres. 
See this thread for reasons. https://forum.classicmotorworks.com/index.php/topic,24471.0.html
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Paul_42

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Reply #10 on: July 24, 2018, 03:21:25 am
Hi jellyroll, im running Bridgestone BT45's. gone up a profile front and rear. 110/80/18 at 30psi front and 130/80/18 at 32psi on the back. Bike tips into corners faster, bit of a pain balance wise in heavy traffic at a walking pace but you get used to it. A hell of a lot of twisty roads and Nasho runs several times a week during the warmer nights where i can see anything up to 160km a trip. Tyres grip well and let you know when your pushing it too hard. the bum wiggles  ;D .Front grip is good, i dont think i have lost traction at the front yet. Wet weather riding is good and confident. Being almost 100kg with gear on the bike gets a good working out. Freeways are fun and speedo needle vibrates at legal speed and sometimes bounces to 140-150k's per hour. Must be a gliche. 8) turned over 12 and a bit thousand kilometers out of these and now due for new rubber.BT45's again.
Cheers all
Paul


Bilgemaster

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Reply #11 on: August 09, 2018, 01:40:26 pm
Maybe it's just my ultra-sedate riding style, but just shy of 4,000 personal miles since getting her in December, and I'm still quite a ways from really wearing out what I imagine must be that stock rear Avon Speedmaster II on my old "iron belly". I kinda doubt it's the original, but it could be. Still plan on getting a pair of Dunlop K70s when the time comes, but I now have to admit those so-called  "Skidmasters" are some kind of long-wearing rubber for the truly cheap at heart. Might not be the most suitable shodding for you sporty peg-scraping Conti types, but for tortoises like me astride oil lamps they seem just fine.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2018, 02:08:00 pm by Bilgemaster »
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.


Richard230

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Reply #12 on: August 09, 2018, 04:01:16 pm
Maybe it's just my ultra-sedate riding style, but just shy of 4,000 personal miles since getting her in December, and I'm still quite a ways from really wearing out what I imagine must be that stock rear Avon Speedmaster II on my old "iron belly". I kinda doubt it's the original, but it could be. Still plan on getting a pair of Dunlop K70s when the time comes, but I now have to admit those so-called  "Skidmasters" are some kind of long-wearing rubber for the truly cheap at heart. Might not be the most suitable shodding for you sporty peg-scraping Conti types, but for tortoises like me astride oil lamps they seem just fine.

I have 6K miles on mine and they are looking less than half worn. But since they were manufactured about 8 years ago, I plan to replace them soon with a set of K70s that I have in my tire closet.  I just hope that the K70's don't follow rain grooves like the original tires did which came on my 1971 Triumph.  That was kind of scary.  :o
2011 Royal Enfield B5 500, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2005 Triumph Bonneville T-100, 2002 Yamaha FZ1


Arizoni

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Reply #13 on: August 09, 2018, 04:07:19 pm

Bilgemaster

Those Avon Speedmaster rear tires do last a long time and it wouldn't surprise me a bit if the one on your iron barrel is an original.

I finally changed my Avon Speedmaster rear tire when it reached 17450 miles and quite honestly, it could have gone another 2-3 thousand miles before the tread was really worn out.

The ribbed Avon Speedmaster on the front of my 2011 G5 wasn't nearly as long lasting.  It needed changing after 7500 miles.

Needless to say, I probably ride like you do.  My days of corner carving went away a long time ago.
Jim
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Bilgemaster

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Reply #14 on: August 09, 2018, 08:36:50 pm
I have 6K miles on mine and they are looking less than half worn. But since they were manufactured about 8 years ago, I plan to replace them soon with a set of K70s that I have in my tire closet.  I just hope that the K70's don't follow rain grooves like the original tires did which came on my 1971 Triumph.  That was kind of scary.  :o

Fortunately, in Virginia and hereabouts we are mostly spared the dreaded rain groovies, though one sees them from time to time in nearby Pennsylvania...albeit not much on the secondary or tertiary roads I tend to travel. I've gotta guess that those Dunlop K70s would have to be a less alarming ride on such grooves than the "ribbed for your pleasure" Avon front I currently have. All the same, some of the Triumph forums do mention the Dunlops as being more prone to the dreaded groove-wobbles than other brands.
So badass my Enfield's actually illegal  in India.