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Author Topic: What would you like to see as accessories on the new twins?  (Read 6719 times)

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Happy Hopper

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I would like to see Tank Kneepads, Fork rubber covers (Gaiters), Rear Carrier (Luggage Rack), Stainless Parts, and Braided Brake lines. What would you like to see as accessories on the new twins?


Narada

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Reply #1 on: November 21, 2017, 09:15:19 am
Saree guard! ;D

Crash bars.

Skid plate.

Bar end mirrors.

Looks like they have center stand, could've sworn I read they didn't?  ???
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2014BulletC5

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Reply #2 on: November 21, 2017, 05:20:21 pm
I see luggage rack mentioned.

I'd like to see saddle bag mounts.
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dginfw

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Reply #3 on: November 21, 2017, 11:07:24 pm
performance exhaust and Power Commander
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Fragman

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Reply #4 on: November 22, 2017, 12:08:20 am
I would go for stainless header pipes(No fookin' cat or O2 sensors!), Norton peashooter mufflers(No baffles.) and chrome mudguards, with the front one being of a more encompassing of the wheel radius to keep goop off of the motor.

An EJK fuel controller would be on the list as well. As fer the rest, I'd just tiddle some stuff like adding flanged alloy wheels & bar end mirrors and black coat the signal housings. Oh, the fun of it. 8)
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Chuck D

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Reply #5 on: November 24, 2017, 07:06:00 am
Kickstarter ::).
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johno

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Reply #6 on: November 24, 2017, 10:43:16 am
shaft drive.......just to be differant
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krusty

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Reply #7 on: November 24, 2017, 12:18:18 pm
A Rickman Metisse variant would be interesting, complete with chromed or nickel plated frame.
Maybe even a full fairing.
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Rattlebattle

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Reply #8 on: November 25, 2017, 01:07:49 pm
Early release of a full power one with bigger inlets and valves, hotter cams, Twin front discs and fully adjustable suspension front and rear ie a crack at emulating a real cafe racer. :) Seriously, a pokey motor in the small frame of the 650 would produce a great bike - never mind newbie riders, let’s have a proper rip snorter I say. :)
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ace.cafe

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Reply #9 on: November 25, 2017, 04:27:56 pm
Early release of a full power one with bigger inlets and valves, hotter cams, Twin front discs and fully adjustable suspension front and rear ie a crack at emulating a real cafe racer. :) Seriously, a pokey motor in the small frame of the 650 would produce a great bike - never mind newbie riders, let’s have a proper rip snorter I say. :)
Unfortunately,  RE hasn't the slightest idea how to do such a thing, and they never have.


Richard230

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Reply #10 on: November 25, 2017, 04:53:43 pm
Unfortunately,  RE hasn't the slightest idea how to do such a thing, and they never have.

I agree and if they did all that, there goes the price - right into Triumph's backyard.  ::)
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ace.cafe

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Reply #11 on: November 25, 2017, 05:07:07 pm
I agree and if they did all that, there goes the price - right into Triumph's backyard.  ::)
The sad thing is that if RE had a clue, they could have made something like the Ace head, cast it in high volume, and it wouldn't have cost any more than their standard head, and it fits all the existing standard ancillaries without mods. They could have produced the Ace cam profile at no higher cost than std factory cams. They could have produced the Ace/Derottone airbox kit at no extra cost over what they put in the bike as standard, if they had made them in mass quantity.

In short, they could have produced a 43hp  535 CGT that is as fast as the upcoming 650 twin and narrower and more nimble. At no higher production cost than what they actually produced.

But, they can't make something that they don't know how to make, and that is the long and short of it. The proof is in the pudding. Just look at what they produced, if you need proof.

« Last Edit: November 25, 2017, 05:14:12 pm by ace.cafe »


Arizoni

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Reply #12 on: November 25, 2017, 11:18:01 pm
IMO, Royal Enfield is not interested in making fast motorcycles.

They want to build moderately powered machines that get people from point A to point B on a classic looking machine.

In a country like India, where most of their sales are, most of the people ride 50-125cc motorcycles.
The traffic is shitty and the roads are even shittier so building a super-bike is not seen as a big priority by RE.

Besides.  If RE did offer super heads, cams, rods and bearings for their singles and the new twin, Ace would be out of business. :(
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ace.cafe

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Reply #13 on: November 26, 2017, 06:28:44 am
IMO, Royal Enfield is not interested in making fast motorcycles.

They want to build moderately powered machines that get people from point A to point B on a classic looking machine.

In a country like India, where most of their sales are, most of the people ride 50-125cc motorcycles.
The traffic is shitty and the roads are even shittier so building a super-bike is not seen as a big priority by RE.

Besides.  If RE did offer super heads, cams, rods and bearings for their singles and the new twin, Ace would be out of business. :(

I understand that notion about RE not "wanting" to make fast motorcycles, but I don't find it believable. I believe it's a marketing cover story for inadequacy.

After spending the kind of time inside these bikes that I have over the years,  it really becomes clear that what we have here is a company that spent 53 years assembling somebody else's design made on somebody else's tooling. The things they were compelled to add, such as the left shift and electric start were pathetic. Although, I will give them credit for getting that 5-speed box design from McGuigan. That was a good purchase, but it wasn't RE design.
AVL and others did the newer engines and chassis designs, and all RE did was try to make it as cheap as possible with very little regard for quality or reliability. They are an assembly factory, not an engineering firm.

So now, we come to the newest product, which admittedly has nice styling and the spec sheet has the buzzwords that the detractors have been deriding RE about for years.  People have cynically asked about why no multi-cylinder, why no OHC, or why no 4-valves per cylinder, or why no 6-speed gearbox, short stroke, etc. The reason is that modern bike enthusiasts equate these things with power and speed, and all the other makers have them, so "what's wrong with RE, and why are they so behind?"

So, they put all that stuff in there with this new 650 twin, and ended up with 47hp at 7100 rpm, making practically no beneficial use from those designs, and ending up with what they could have made with a 535cc pushrod long stroke 2-valve single. It's like they thought that just having that stuff in there would cover the bases, but they didn't do anything with it. All of it didn't give any more result than the old technology of the old Bullet. It's basically just a bigger displacement engine.

Who needs short stroke, OHC, and 4-valve per cylinder for 7100 rpm?  Those things are for high-revvers.
Who needs 6-speed gearbox for a wide powerband engine? That's for a peaky narrow power band performance engine.
It seems very apparent that these attributes were intended to "tick all the boxes" for marketing purposes.

Look, all I'm saying is the if they go to the extent of putting these things in the engine, it is silly to not use them, and instead produce power output that is associated with a much lower tech powerplant. It strikes me as "cosmetic design" for the purposes of marketing, but forgetting to make anything out of the parts that they put in there . They are making the heads and cams and ports and valves and all that anyway,  so what's the big reason for not getting anything out of it? That they "don't want power"?
I'm just not buying that reason. My assessment from being up to my eyeballs in RE engines for more than 10 years, and seeing how they make things, is telling me that they actually do not know, and they don't want to pay for an outsource to design it.

I have read all the same articles that everyone else has read over the last few years, with Sid Lal's statements quoted in them. And those statements were always about how much more profit RE made than anyone else, and how they wanted to take over the middle displacement market. But I never saw one statement that he wanted to build the best motorcycle.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 06:36:09 am by ace.cafe »


Richard230

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Reply #14 on: November 26, 2017, 08:31:33 am
I don't know about RE, but any other motorcycle manufacturer, such as BMW (which I am familiar with), typically will come out with a lower-spec model to suck up the beta testers and gotta-have-it-now crowd and then a couple of years later entice them and any others that didn't bite the first bullet with a better performing, higher-spec, improved (and likely heavier) new model to sweep up any customers that they missed the first time. (Or in the case of BMW the new model will fix all of the deficiencies of the first version.  ::)  )
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Rattlebattle

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Reply #15 on: November 26, 2017, 09:15:50 am
There has been a fair amount of English input to the development of the 650. Also, the bikes are to be assembled on a new production line, not hand assembled (which RE actually use to use as a positive attribute...). I don’t believe that RE does not have access to design know how (though I doubt it has in-house knowledge- but neither does Thailand where Triumphs are made). What remains to be seen is the extent to which RE is really influenced (or needs to be) by external markets, given that adequate profits are being made from the 90+% sales they make in India. It makes sense for bikes designed in the first world to be made in third world countries - all the established manufacturers do this.
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Narada

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Reply #16 on: November 26, 2017, 11:22:18 am
Weren't "they" a bunch of ex-Triumph engineers? ???
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ace.cafe

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Reply #17 on: November 26, 2017, 11:53:18 am
Weren't "they" a bunch of ex-Triumph engineers? ???
I don't know who remains. I know Terblanche quit, and I don't know who else. A couple years ago they had a headhunter company looking for people in the UK facility.

However,  I do remember the "snorkel bike" and that other custom thing they made.


« Last Edit: November 26, 2017, 11:55:41 am by ace.cafe »


Guaire

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Reply #18 on: November 26, 2017, 05:14:22 pm
  Storage. Easy way to take stuff on a ride. Throw a good looking, well integrated, saddle bag over the saddle. A wind busting wind screen. That's it.
  Customers shouldn't have to re design heads, combustion chambers, air intakes to get the engine's inherent capability to show up. Something is wrong. Stupid is a strong contender.
  Entitlement is a disease. The Brit industry had it bad. BSA named their motorcycles "consumer durables". Sounds like washing machines. In the real world, form follows function. If you want it run like a Lightning bolt, you might have some form, but it better function. Saying it looks like an Interceptor from the sixties isn't enough. The bike has to run, in today's market, as if Interceptor is a good descriptor of the machine's character, by today's customer. Entitlement means you believe you can release a machine that doesn't measure up, but you want people to dress up like it's 1965 and by the way, here's a motorcycle to go with your hip ensemble. They ought to be making clothes, not motorcycles.
  A passion for making a strong motorcycle is the essence. If you build the essence into the machine, you don't need marketing gimmicks. Buy one so you can pretend you're in London is a sick reason to sell and buy a motorcycle. Entitlement is just another mental disease.
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Rattlebattle

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Reply #19 on: November 27, 2017, 10:54:31 am
To me that sums up the CGT exactly; what a limp wristed contraption that turned out to be, though there's a really good bike in there waiting to be liberated. I wonder how long the hipster craze will continue to thrive? I just wish they'd go pick something else (scooters?) and leave bikes to people who are interested in riding them hard and maintaining them. That way we might just get full power versions of what would then be pretty good. Having looked at the cutaway engine it's pretty obvious that it was built as a low power unit; the inlet tracts are very narrow. Why not build one that has more power? The cost would be similar assuming the basic design can take more power - it looks like it could easily do so.
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hpwaco

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Reply #20 on: December 04, 2017, 04:42:24 pm
A gear indicator.


Narada

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Reply #21 on: December 06, 2017, 10:35:45 pm
Either the Interceptor or CGT twins would be gorgeous with a sidecar! 8)
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Grant Borden

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Reply #22 on: December 07, 2017, 07:01:12 am
Agreed!

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heloego

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Reply #23 on: December 07, 2017, 07:43:21 am
Oh Yeah!
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elysianforest

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Reply #24 on: December 07, 2017, 11:46:33 am
I totally want a kickstarter. I am really sad that it doesn't seem to be on offer for these bikes.

I know I'm a relative newb here so my opinion is possibly not generally held in very high regard, but I've just got to say that RE, and their modus operandi, is the main reason I am back on a bike after nearly 20 years of relative avoidance due to a crash that really wasn't much fun. If I was looking for an 80hp bike I'd be looking at a brand that does that - not Royal Enfield.  I feel like part of the fun of RE is that you have a chance to actually get to know the bike: I can meaningfully upgrade it, I can take a few hours out of a weekend and decoke the head if I haven't jetted the carb properly, etc. I don't actually have a lot of interest in a motorcycle that I can't make better or fix on my own. I enjoy taking my RE to its limit rather it taking me to my own. I like that these scoots get comparatively decent fuel economy which I can trade in for more horses if I chose to. I get to make choices about a bike that reminds me of the bikes my father loved and the reason I became interested in the first place. Does that all make me a hipster wuss? Maybe so... but I'm having too much fun with my motorcycle to care.

Speaking of hipsters - they really seem to get a good deal of vitriol around here and other places, which is admittedly perhaps well deserved. What I never seem to see much mention of though is that nearly ubiquitous (at least around here) middle ager getting out of his Escalade every first Sunday to don his $1300 set of leathers and ride to the local "roadhouse" on a shiny and pristine $20k Softail. Why do these guys get more respect? Personally, I think that whatever gets you actually riding and having a good time is just fine by me.


Blairio

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Reply #25 on: December 08, 2017, 09:50:36 pm
I would like to see Tank Kneepads, Fork rubber covers (Gaiters), Rear Carrier (Luggage Rack), Stainless Parts, and Braided Brake lines. What would you like to see as accessories on the new twins?

Actually, I would like to see all of these fitted as standard, rather than as options, although I guess that not everyone wants a rear carrier.


Blairio

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Reply #26 on: December 08, 2017, 10:13:08 pm
Speaking of hipsters - they really seem to get a good deal of vitriol around here and other places, which is admittedly perhaps well deserved. What I never seem to see much mention of though is that nearly ubiquitous (at least around here) middle ager getting out of his Escalade every first Sunday to don his $1300 set of leathers and ride to the local "roadhouse" on a shiny and pristine $20k Softail. Why do these guys get more respect? Personally, I think that whatever gets you actually riding and having a good time is just fine by me.

I wasn't really sure what a hipster is or whether they are any better or worse than other trendies, so I looked for a definition. The one I found was 'Hipsters are a subculture of men and women typically in their 20's and 30's that value independent thinking, counter-culture, progressive politics, an appreciation of art and indie-rock, creativity, intelligence, and witty banter.'  That doesn't sound like too bad a set of aspirations to me. I am way to old to be a hipster, but I think my son and his pals (boys and girls) probably fall into that category. Their preferred mode of transport is the bicycle, or occasionally a car from getting from A to B.

Defining yourself by the vehicle you sit on or in always struck me as odd, in the same way that arbitrarily asserting that someone who rides a motorbike is somehow superior to someone who rides a scooter (or vice versa). What genius came up with that one? I am old enough to remember groups of young men knocking 9 bells out of each other because one set turned up at a seaside town on scooters and the other motorbikes.  Madness. For most of my life I have had both scoots and motorbikes. There is a lot of fun and utility to be had from both.

On the middle aged owner and the $20k soft-tail .. we have our own version.  I call them 'Hell's Accountants'.


heloego

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Reply #27 on: December 10, 2017, 07:46:51 am
   Yep. A kicker would be nice.
   I suspect the lack of one is due to cost-effectiveness combined with current preferences by newer riders.
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Rattlebattle

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Reply #28 on: December 10, 2017, 10:53:47 am
I doubt that it's a cost issue; I feel that it's more likely that they want to move away from the inference that a kickstart is needed in case the electric start packs up. I would think that with the new EFI and the fact that the electric start will have an easier time turning over the crankshaft a kickstart would not be necessary. None of the other modern twins has one. By contrast the early C5 bikes didn't have one and that could be a problem. The absence of a kickstart on the 650 is a shame because it's handy for freeing the clutch plates and for servicing the engine.
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elysianforest

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Reply #29 on: December 10, 2017, 01:08:46 pm
It may just be a simplicity issue. Kickstarts used to be the norm and it was a novelty to have an electric start. Now electric starts are the norm and it's a novelty to have a kickstart. Having both does make for more parts than are strictly needed. I'd just rather have a kickstart (or both) on this size/style of bike.


Narada

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Reply #30 on: December 10, 2017, 03:24:14 pm
Maybe they don't want to confuse the Hipsters?  :o

My guess is that it is for lower production costs / higher profit margin.  ::)

I would definately pay the extra cost to have one, both for looks and practicality.  8)
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Richard230

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Reply #31 on: December 10, 2017, 04:10:02 pm
My daughter has a kick starter on her 1981 BMW R65LS and we have never used it to start the bike.  (I tried several times and couldn't get the bike to start. It just kicks it over too slow.)  However, the kick starter is useful for turning over the engine when setting the valve lash, instead of having to remove the front engine cover and rotate the engine using the nut on the end of the crankshaft.
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elysianforest

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Reply #32 on: December 10, 2017, 04:17:50 pm
They could've allowed for a kickstarter in the engine casting and then charged a pretty penny as an optional upgrade. Had they done that they would avoid any perceptional issues of it needing a kicker because of a crappy starter, and they could make a bit more profit on us not-hipsters.   8)


Blairio

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Reply #33 on: December 10, 2017, 09:00:16 pm
At least you will be able to bump-start it.  There's no bump-starting an electric motorbike...... I think.


Rattlebattle

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Reply #34 on: December 11, 2017, 07:29:00 am
Nothing to bump on an electric bike....If RE were to provide a kickstart on the Twin I hope it’s a better design than on the UCE, which in my view doesn’t look great and also feels flimsy. It should have s folding pedal, not fold at the shaft like an old Jap
two-stroke. I suspect that apart from Hipsters it’ll be old blokes who buy the 650. These days who wants to be bothered with kick starting an engine? Not me, though they’re useful for servicing.
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Richard230

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Reply #35 on: December 11, 2017, 08:21:01 am
At least you will be able to bump-start it.  There's no bump-starting an electric motorbike...... I think.

What is worse is that electric motorcycles are really hard to push when they run out of power.  Mine did once some years ago and I tried pushing it up the hill leading to my garage and I just couldn't do it. The drag of that electric motor (when off) felt like it added 200 pounds to the weight of the bike.  However, I discovered that if I allowed the batteries to recover for a minute, I could get them to push the bike about 100 feet at a time up the hill before they died again, so I was finally able to get home, bit by bit, without suffering a heart attack. 

Instead of a kick starter, perhaps bicycle pedals would be the best solution for an electric motorcycle, as was used during the early 1900's for "LPA", light pedal assistance - which had a reputation of giving some of their riders actual heart attacks when trying to assist the motorbikes up a steep hill.    :o
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Blairio

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Reply #36 on: December 11, 2017, 09:47:01 pm
Nothing to bump on an electric bike....If RE were to provide a kickstart on the Twin I hope it’s a better design than on the UCE, which in my view doesn’t look great and also feels flimsy. It should have s folding pedal, not fold at the shaft like an old Jap
two-stroke. I suspect that apart from Hipsters it’ll be old blokes who buy the 650. These days who wants to be bothered with kick starting an engine? Not me, though they’re useful for servicing.

I guess a kickstart might get you going again if your battery was flat, but if that were the case with these bikes the fuel injection wouldn't pressurise. Therefore why introduce the complexity of a kickstart (and the weight) for no good reason?


Blairio

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Reply #37 on: December 11, 2017, 09:57:21 pm

Instead of a kick starter, perhaps bicycle pedals would be the best solution for an electric motorcycle, as was used during the early 1900's for "LPA", light pedal assistance - which had a reputation of giving some of their riders actual heart attacks when trying to assist the motorbikes up a steep hill.    :o

In the 1970's 50cc mopeds were required by law to be pedal-able, even the sporty ones that could top 50mph! Actually, that's what I would like for Christmas: not a 650cc Enfield but a perfectly restored Yamaha FS1E..... or maybe  Suzuki AP50, or (the daddy of them all) a Fantic GT Super 6.


Richard230

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Reply #38 on: December 12, 2017, 08:09:40 am
In the 1970's 50cc mopeds were required by law to be pedal-able, even the sporty ones that could top 50mph! Actually, that's what I would like for Christmas: not a 650cc Enfield but a perfectly restored Yamaha FS1E..... or maybe  Suzuki AP50, or (the daddy of them all) a Fantic GT Super 6.

And as I recall on some of those hot mo-peds you had to be careful which pedal was down as you went around a corner. You didn't want a pedal to be down on the inside of the corner.  :o
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mevocgt

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Reply #39 on: December 12, 2017, 02:52:34 pm
I totally want a kickstarter. I am really sad that it doesn't seem to be on offer for these bikes.

I know I'm a relative newb here so my opinion is possibly not generally held in very high regard, but I've just got to say that RE, and their modus operandi, is the main reason I am back on a bike after nearly 20 years of relative avoidance due to a crash that really wasn't much fun. If I was looking for an 80hp bike I'd be looking at a brand that does that - not Royal Enfield.  I feel like part of the fun of RE is that you have a chance to actually get to know the bike: I can meaningfully upgrade it, I can take a few hours out of a weekend and decoke the head if I haven't jetted the carb properly, etc. I don't actually have a lot of interest in a motorcycle that I can't make better or fix on my own. I enjoy taking my RE to its limit rather it taking me to my own. I like that these scoots get comparatively decent fuel economy which I can trade in for more horses if I chose to. I get to make choices about a bike that reminds me of the bikes my father loved and the reason I became interested in the first place. Does that all make me a hipster wuss? Maybe so... but I'm having too much fun with my motorcycle to care.

Speaking of hipsters - they really seem to get a good deal of vitriol around here and other places, which is admittedly perhaps well deserved. What I never seem to see much mention of though is that nearly ubiquitous (at least around here) middle ager getting out of his Escalade every first Sunday to don his $1300 set of leathers and ride to the local "roadhouse" on a shiny and pristine $20k Softail. Why do these guys get more respect? Personally, I think that whatever gets you actually riding and having a good time is just fine by me.
Hay....I resemble that remark.....only without the $1300 leaders.......or the $20,000 HD......oh ya, I don't usually stop at the "roadhouse".

Usually too busy riding......


SSdriver

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Reply #40 on: December 12, 2017, 07:33:59 pm
In the 1970's 50cc mopeds were required by law to be pedal-able, even the sporty ones that could top 50mph! Actually, that's what I would like for Christmas: not a 650cc Enfield but a perfectly restored Yamaha FS1E..... or maybe  Suzuki AP50, or (the daddy of them all) a Fantic GT Super 6.

Since we're off topic anyway....These are two I had in the early 60's. Sears and Roebuck specials. The Moped would top out at about 30 and the Scoot managed 45.
Wish I still had em!

As far as the kick start on the 650...I think it would only be good for looks.
Cheers...Jim
« Last Edit: December 13, 2017, 09:54:36 am by SSdriver »
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Reply #41 on: December 13, 2017, 08:34:30 am
Since we're off topic anyway....These are two I had in the early 60's. Sears and Roebuck specials. The Moped would top out at about 30 and the Scoot managed 45.
Wish I still em!

As far as the kick start on the 650...I think it would only be good for looks.
Cheers...Jim

The Sears Roebuck catalog, which arrived at my parents' doorstep twice a year, was my introduction to motorcycles and scooters during the 1950's. Every time a new catalog would arrive, I would first check out the ladies' underwear section and then it was off to the motorcycle/scooter section to see what had changed since the last catalog (usually not much).  Eventually, the ads helped to convince me to buy a 1962 Vespa 125 scooter and a couple of years later, my cousins gave me a (really) clapped-out 1958 Allstate (Puch) 125cc motorcycle for free (since they couldn't sell it), which had a oval rear wheel, the cooling fan removed, the muffler insides removed and various other issues too horrible to mention.  But it did get me down the road, bouncing up and down, for a year before I finally gave up and did something unspeakable to the bike - which I can no longer recall.  ::)  After that, I bought a 1963 Yamaha YD3 touring smoke-bomb.  ::)
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Reply #42 on: December 13, 2017, 03:36:34 pm
Richard, you should've gone for the Scrambler - think of all the errors in judgement you could have avoided!


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Reply #43 on: December 13, 2017, 04:16:02 pm
Richard, you should've gone for the Scrambler - think of all the errors in judgement you could have avoided!

I know a fellow (even older than me) who used to race the Allstate Puch Scrambler.  He said it was very competitive, but was only sold for one year before it was withdrawn from the Sears lineup and no longer imported into the U.S. He didn't know why this was, but my guess is that getting after-sales support for a race bike from Puch was more than Sears wanted to deal with. 
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Reply #44 on: December 13, 2017, 06:28:39 pm
Umm,... a real dealer network and full parts support for the older models.


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Reply #45 on: December 13, 2017, 07:40:42 pm
Richard, back in the day, 1950s into the 1960s, Puch had a good dealer network with all the parts one  needed in Colorado.  The local dealer, Rocky Mountain Motorcycles in Boulder, raced Puchs in local Scrambles and were quite successful with them.  Always liked the Puch.

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Bill
« Last Edit: December 16, 2017, 11:09:34 pm by Bill Harris »


Richard230

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Reply #46 on: December 14, 2017, 08:30:15 am
Richard, back in the day, 1950s into the 1960s, Pugh had a good dealer network with all the parts one  needed in Colorado.  The local dealer, Rocky Mountain Motorcycles in Boulder, raced Pughs in local Scrambles and were quite successful with them.  Always liked the Pugh.

Cheers,
Bill
 

That is interesting.  If Pugh had any dealers in California, I never heard about them (which doesn't necessarily mean anything  ;) ).  But I know for sure that they didn't do any advertising in the motorcycle magazines, like Cycle World, that I read during the 1960's, because I read every word in those magazines.  ;D
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Bill Harris

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Reply #47 on: December 14, 2017, 11:36:50 pm
 

That is interesting.  If Puch had any dealers in California, I never heard about them (which doesn't necessarily mean anything  ;) ).  But I know for sure that they didn't do any advertising in the motorcycle magazines, like Cycle World, that I read during the 1960's, because I read every word in those magazines.  ;D

Now that you mention it, I never saw any advertising for Puch either, but in Colorado we had them and They were winning races.

Cheers,
Bill
« Last Edit: December 16, 2017, 11:08:05 pm by Bill Harris »


Jako

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Reply #48 on: December 15, 2017, 12:28:06 am
The Sears Roebuck catalog, which arrived at my parents' doorstep twice a year, was my introduction to motorcycles and scooters during the 1950's. Every time a new catalog would arrive, I would first check out the ladies' underwear section and then it was off to the motorcycle/scooter section to see what had changed since the last catalog (usually not much).  Eventually, the ads helped to convince me to buy a 1962 Vespa 125 scooter and a couple of years later, my cousins gave me a (really) clapped-out 1958 Allstate (Puch) 125cc motorcycle for free (since they couldn't sell it), which had a oval rear wheel, the cooling fan removed, the muffler insides removed and various other issues too horrible to mention.  But it did get me down the road, bouncing up and down, for a year before I finally gave up and did something unspeakable to the bike - which I can no longer recall.  ::)  After that, I bought a 1963 Yamaha YD3 touring smoke-bomb.  ::)

Did the ads eventually convince you to buy the ladies underwear  ?  ;D
« Last Edit: December 15, 2017, 02:55:14 pm by Jako »
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Richard230

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Reply #49 on: December 15, 2017, 08:14:30 am
Did the adds eventually convince you to buy the ladies underwear  ?  ;D

 ;D
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Reply #50 on: December 15, 2017, 11:25:25 am
Are you guys talking about Puch, an Austrian make available in the U.K. in the early seventies? I well remember one of their 125cc or maybe 175cc two-stroke singles in a dealer’s window. The cylinder head had a kind of starburst finning on it, a bit reminiscent of the Fanny B etc when they fitted the ill-fated AMC engine. IIRC they were made by Puch-Steyr-Daimler and went pretty well though were too pricey to compete with the Jap two-strokes. Or are you really talking about a Pugh, a make I’ve not come across?
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Richard230

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Reply #51 on: December 15, 2017, 04:36:53 pm
Are you guys talking about Puch, an Austrian make available in the U.K. in the early seventies? I well remember one of their 125cc or maybe 175cc two-stroke singles in a dealer’s window. The cylinder head had a kind of starburst finning on it, a bit reminiscent of the Fanny B etc when they fitted the ill-fated AMC engine. IIRC they were made by Puch-Steyr-Daimler and went pretty well though were too pricey to compete with the Jap two-strokes. Or are you really talking about a Pugh, a make I’ve not come across?

I was thinking of Puch, but since my memory isn't perfect, I thought I might have been mistaken about spelling as Bill seemed to know what he was talking about by spelling the brand Pugh (plus the forum spell checker didn't put a red line under that spelling of the name).  So Rattlebattle, it is nice to know that I might have been right in the first place.   :)

Puch was the inventor, and to my knowledge the only manufacturer, that used the "Twingle" combustion design in their 175 and 250cc two-stroke engines.  It had two linked combustion chambers, with two small, slightly off-set pistons, on the same connecting rod.  The rear combustion chamber was fed by a single carburetor and the front combustion chamber expelled the burnt gases through a single exhaust pipe.  A very interesting and fuel-efficient design that eliminated the deflector piston that was used in most other two stroke engines up until the 1940's.
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Reply #52 on: December 15, 2017, 04:43:10 pm
I think they are talking about the Puch.

The only thing I can find about a Pugh is the "Hurley-Pugh".
It was a British motorcycle made from the 1920's thru the end of WW II.

Needless to say, they weren't imported into the US in recent times.  8)
Jim
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Rattlebattle

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Reply #53 on: December 16, 2017, 05:33:01 am
Ah yes, I'd forgotten about the Puch split single as we called them. It was an attempt to separate the incoming mixture from the exhaust gasses IIRC. I have a line drawing of the engine in an ancient book on motorcycle maintenance I bought with school prize money. The headmaster wasn't too pleased as he expected me to buy a book relating to whatever subject it was.....Thinking about the manufacturer I think it was Steyr-Daimler-Puch, not as previously stated. Apologies. The single I was referring to had a conventional piston port engine. The bike seemed to be very well made but was too expensive for its capacity.
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Reply #54 on: December 16, 2017, 05:54:29 pm
I'd like the twin to have good locking-top panniers such as Bates used to make.
The Puch (pook) trail bikes were similar to the Zundapps, both framed by specialty firms like Rickman. I had a wretched Puch twingle, a 50s design intended to allow a 2-stroke to run on poor gas for speeds up to 50mph. I sold it and bought a faster Zundapp Super Sabre. IFRC, DKW and NSU made race twingles in the 60s. I'll shaddup now. ;)
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Reply #55 on: December 16, 2017, 11:46:46 pm
My bad, the G is too close to the H, TYPEO.😬 The spelling of the Austrian motorcycle cycle company is Puch.

Old people!

Cheers,
Old Bill
« Last Edit: December 16, 2017, 11:59:53 pm by Bill Harris »


Bill Harris

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Reply #56 on: December 17, 2017, 10:07:20 pm
I would like to see high pipes and aggressive dual sports tires as an option on the Interceptor, as well as a sump guard.  What do all of you think?

Royal Enfield people are good people

Cheers,
Bill


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Reply #57 on: December 18, 2017, 05:50:55 am
Oh, Yeah!  ;D
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Reply #58 on: December 31, 2017, 04:20:05 am
Well Blairio - you just took me back to my Grammar School Days...... Yes U.K born (now in Perth Western Australia) with your reminiscing on the mopeds, we were allowed them at 15yrs old, and yes had to be able to pedal them home if required  :) Mates had the "Yammie Fizzer" or the Suzuki, one had the Fantic "Chopper" whilst mine was an "A.J.S" - desperation by a dying btoish motorcycle company taking an Italian Engine (Moto-Minarelli ??) in a cradle frame, no battery, candle for headlight and a speedo that snapped cables  until I just gave up......but still quicker than the others in my "Barry Sheene" replica helmet .......o.h the days.......and the Kwaka H1 that tried to kill me with a frame as rigid as a pair of hinges welded together !


SSdriver

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Reply #59 on: January 01, 2018, 09:41:38 am
These should be available immediately! They would be my first Mod.
Sorry I did such a lousy editing job, but it's enough to get the idea.
Cheers...Jimmy
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Bill Harris

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Reply #60 on: January 01, 2018, 08:03:45 pm
These should be available immediately! They would be my first Mod.
Sorry I did such a lousy editing job, but it's enough to get the idea.
Cheers...Jimmy
Yes, that's what I'm talking about!  I like it a lot. 😁

Royal Enfield people are good people

Cheers,
Bill
« Last Edit: January 01, 2018, 08:15:05 pm by Bill Harris »


rtillery02

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Reply #61 on: January 18, 2018, 08:22:16 pm
some readily available extended front brake lines for taller bars would be convenient, of course some proper saddle bags & MOUNTS, a low sitting 'soft' solo seat with a stylish luggage rack, forward control option or forward pegs....geez, sounds like I want a whole different bike, oh well.
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elysianforest

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Reply #62 on: January 19, 2018, 09:47:13 am
Umm,... a real dealer network and full parts support for the older models.

True dat... Don't know why I missed this comment earlier.

The dealer network may be beginning though. I just looked at the RE website dealer locator and there's now one in my state where there wasn't a few months ago when I looked. It would seem I don't need to drive over 400 miles anymore to visit one. Yipee!

I don't have high hopes for the parts support however.  :-\


Guaire

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Reply #63 on: January 24, 2018, 07:46:00 am
How about an accessory deal when buying a new 650? Factory sourced add ons like: rear rack, saddle bags or pannier bags, windscreens, bark busters, GPS mount, phone mount, 12v socket. Sorry, no sari guards. Dealers could sweeten the deal with a accessory upgrade kit, for a too good to say no upgrade price for stuff you want to have anyway!
  Dealers have been doing this type of deal for years. What makes this one different is the economic leverage from the factory’s cost, made in India.
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Narada

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Reply #64 on: January 24, 2018, 10:52:15 am
One stop shopping would be nice... Including map upgrades if needed. ::)  As for saree gaurds, I know a guy...  8)
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gizzo

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Reply #65 on: April 06, 2018, 03:32:32 am
Looks like the new twins come with a centre stand with proper feet that makes it easy to roll the bike off the stand. Not like the Real CGT centre stand with those stupid bits of tube for feet that skid across the concrete.
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portisheadric

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Reply #66 on: April 06, 2018, 04:36:38 am
Some 'RE' embossed pipe wrap to cover those hideous tubular contraptions running to and from the radiator   ::)
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