Author Topic: 100 mph on the Speedometer !  (Read 9221 times)

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singhg5

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Reply #30 on: April 12, 2016, 09:11:59 pm
That worked great! You just need to put 40000 miles on it,again!

HA HA HA  :)

  Take it easy breaking that bike in. ;D

Yup ! I have to slowly slowly hurry up  ;).

I pulled the speedometer apart and below is what it REally looks like - It is pretty much non-serviceable. It is like a fine clock / watch with small, delicate and precise parts inside. The dial glass has a chrome ring around it which is crimped  and sealed like a soup can. A small change in its parts or misalignment or loose joint can mess it up. It can't be put back together.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2016, 11:50:35 pm by singhg5 »
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AussieDave

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Reply #31 on: April 13, 2016, 12:59:18 am
I put mine back together but there was some deformation of the chrome ring at the back . Still accurate 2 years later .... :)
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Ice

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Reply #32 on: April 13, 2016, 01:47:33 am
HA HA HA  :)

Yup ! I have to slowly slowly hurry up  ;).

I pulled the speedometer apart and below is what it REally looks like - It is pretty much non-serviceable. It is like a fine clock / watch with small, delicate and precise parts inside. The dial glass has a chrome ring around it which is crimped  and sealed like a soup can. A small change in its parts or misalignment or loose joint can mess it up. It can't be put back together.

 PM inbound !
I can break it better,,,,at night, in the rain, on the trail,, 20 miles from nowhere.

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Arizoni

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Reply #33 on: April 13, 2016, 06:59:07 pm


I pulled the speedometer apart and below is what it REally looks like - It is pretty much non-serviceable. It is like a fine clock / watch with small, delicate and precise parts inside...

From what I've read in this post, the main problem seemed to be after 40,000 miles the shaft bearing and face bearing on the shaft that the cable connects to wore out and allowed the upper rotating part(s) to cause the destruction.

Now that you've tore your speedometer apart, do you see any reason I couldn't remove the speedometer and apply some very light weight oil to the input shaft to lube the bearings?
Jim
2011 G5 Deluxe
1999 Miata 10th Anniversary


singhg5

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Reply #34 on: April 14, 2016, 12:16:53 pm
I put mine back together but there was some deformation of the chrome ring at the back . Still accurate 2 years later .... :)

Yes, I remember your thread for adjusting spring tension on speedometer - here is the link

https://forum.classicmotorworks.com/index.php/topic,17430.0/all.html

Fortunately that did not involve complete disassembly of individual parts, because then it is gone for ever.

Good for you.
1970's Jawa /  Yezdi
2006 Honda Nighthawk
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singhg5

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Reply #35 on: April 14, 2016, 12:54:37 pm
From what I've read in this post, the main problem seemed to be after 40,000 miles the shaft bearing and face bearing on the shaft that the cable connects to wore out and allowed the upper rotating part(s) to cause the destruction.

Now that you've tore your speedometer apart, do you see any reason I couldn't remove the speedometer and apply some very light weight oil to the input shaft to lube the bearings?

There a few things to keep in mind.

1.  Chrome ring un-crimping and re-crimping on the speedo case is going to show some nicks and cuts on its edges. They may be small or big cuts. This may affect the sealing.

2. The bottom end (tip) of spindle for the speedo cup sits inside a very small pot-hole in the shaft for magnetic bowl (pictures 2920C and 2907A). It cannot be lubricated from the bottom, where the speedo cable enters into speedometer. It is a blind hole for the tip of spindle to rest on.

This pot-hole is not accessible from the top in an intact unit, since it is completely surrounded by the round lip of upside-down speedo cup, which itself is enclosed inside the magnetic bowl. It is like a pearl inside a clam shell - can't reach it unless opened.

Cannot open it unless the RIGID frame around it is broken. 

3. The top end of spindle for the speedo cup can be accessed for lubing IF the dial needle is successfully pulled off the spindle (picture 2916C)

In my case, the two were glued. The broken end of spindle remained inside the dial needle.

4. There can be other reasons for malfunctioning of the speedometer - not necessarily the free rotation of spindles. One of them has been mentioned by GHG that the bottom threaded housing, for the shaft into which speedo cable is inserted, is also riveted to the frame. This rivet can become loose and whole bottom half of drive mechanism can start wobbling.

It MAY be possible to solder at that joint from the outside.

5. One can try and see how far one gets in fixing the speedo. But there is a good chance that it will need a new replacement.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2016, 04:37:47 pm by singhg5 »
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singhg5

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Reply #36 on: April 14, 2016, 12:56:43 pm
Top End of Spindle of Speedo Cup
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gashousegorilla

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Reply #37 on: April 14, 2016, 09:11:44 pm
PM inbound !

 You want my old one to ?   You know, mix and match ?
An thaibhsí atá rattling ag an doras agus tá sé an diabhal sa chathaoir.


singhg5

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Reply #38 on: April 15, 2016, 12:21:51 am
Here is the first video on this speedometer project -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQ3KFhdPRdA

The next one will be done in a few days.
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heloego

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Reply #39 on: April 15, 2016, 09:21:20 am
Again, a very well done video from the master.  ;D
Thanks, Singh Ji!
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singhg5

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Reply #40 on: April 17, 2016, 10:27:18 am
From what I've read in this post, the main problem seemed to be after 40,000 miles the shaft bearing and face bearing on the shaft that the cable connects to wore out and allowed the upper rotating part(s) to cause the destruction.

Now that you've tore your speedometer apart, do you see any reason I couldn't remove the speedometer and apply some very light weight oil to the input shaft to lube the bearings?

Jim:

I was very tired and had missed your point when I had quickly skimmed through your post earlier that day :-[. BUT the next morning, I realized it and now I get the chance to update it. Better late than never  ;).

YES - you have a good point.

One can carefully very lightly lube the shaft to which speedo cable is connected. Just take out the speedometer intact, put it upside down and place a tiny drop of light oil. Rotate shaft and let it seep down towards the other end of the magnet shaft (towards the dial). May be this can be done at 10K or 20K mile service. 

But if one takes the chrome ring off, then the shaft for magnet can be lubed at both ends (second picture). I hate to take off the crimped chrome ring, unless absolutely necessary.

Again, a very well done video from the master.  ;D
Thanks, Singh Ji!

Thanks  :). Enjoyed your post in the Tech Section. 
« Last Edit: April 17, 2016, 10:36:15 am by singhg5 »
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Arizoni

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Reply #41 on: April 17, 2016, 05:39:22 pm
I knew you would think about your answer and realize I was just suggesting that the rotating input shaft might be oiled to prevent its bearings from wearing out.

It would need a very thin, light weight oil and even then I'm not sure how much of it could be worked up to the upper end under the magnet.

Some day when I have nothing to do I might give it a try. :)
Jim
2011 G5 Deluxe
1999 Miata 10th Anniversary


singhg5

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Reply #42 on: April 19, 2016, 10:43:01 am
I knew you would think about your answer and realize I was just suggesting that the rotating input shaft might be oiled to prevent its bearings from wearing out.

It would need a very thin, light weight oil and even then I'm not sure how much of it could be worked up to the upper end under the magnet.

Some day when I have nothing to do I might give it a try. :)

To answer your question, I even went to a store and bought a food color to test if it will seep through the other end. To my surprise, even after several tries color drops put on one end did not come out from the other end. I tried other thinner liquids. Nothing travelled down. So your suspicion is correct !

Then I took off the small brass ring on the end of the shaft by cutting off the rivet-end of the shaft. As I tried to pull out the shaft, after it travelled a short distance of about 1/2 inch, it would not budge. It was a very tightly fitted shaft. The fit was exactly like an axle in the ball bearings of a wheel. 

Eventually the shaft was out. It has a small, 4 mm wide, groove near the bottom 1/3rd of its length.

Shaft rotates inside a 2-sized-bore housing. The upper 2/3rd of the bore is narrow and a lower small portion of the bore is wider. 

After I looked at these parts, I understood why the color would not come out. So the idea of lubing the shaft from the bottom is unlikely to lube the majority of the upper portion of the shaft. Even lubing from the top may have only minimal effect, if at all. 

Hope CURIOUS MINDS ARE SATISFIED :) !

PS - Perhaps the tip of the shaft may be very slightly (hair-width) flared and wider than the body of the shaft which made it harder to pass through the bore  :-\. The flare could be from a very small residue of the riveted portion, which was cut off to remove the ring on shaft. From the picture and actual piece it is practically invisible, but a micrometer could detect very small difference in the size (diameter) of the tip and the rest of the shaft.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2016, 01:51:49 pm by singhg5 »
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Arizoni

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Reply #43 on: April 19, 2016, 05:34:31 pm
Well, that is a definite harrumph.  :(

Thanks a lot for taking the time to find out how the drive is made.

Knowing this probably saved me some work.  :)
Jim
2011 G5 Deluxe
1999 Miata 10th Anniversary


mattsz

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Reply #44 on: April 19, 2016, 05:45:28 pm
But the real question now, Singh, is: what are you going to do with the rest of your food coloring?